painting firearms

Discussion in 'DIY Projects' started by jjfuller1, Mar 21, 2012.

  1. jjfuller1

    jjfuller1 New Member

    4,738
    2
    0
    i know you can paint ar's. what about other rifles? there is an older used .22 rifle at the LGS that i was thinking i might pick it up and paint it just to have as something different. ive heard people say krylon. are you refering to the spray paint? and also would it stick pretty well to a wood stock and blued barrel? what sort of prep work do i need to do? just hand sanding? or is it more intense?
     
  2. boboso

    boboso New Member

    5
    0
    0
    With anything prep work is key. I always bead blast or sand blast at 40-50 PSI. 1) to give paint a surface to adhere to on plastic/polymer 2) Remove old finish from firearms. Then I blow off dust, spray with brake cleaner to degrease. Finally once dry I spray with Brownell's armor kote or gun kote. I've never used Krylon, but will be in the next few days as I setup another 870 turkey gun. Good luck with the project... Use youtube there are many, many videos on the subject.
     

  3. THEAKDUDE

    THEAKDUDE New Member

    148
    0
    0
    Dura coat all the way
     
  4. 7point62

    7point62 Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

    2,188
    0
    0
    Whatever you do, go slow.
     
  5. Bear304inc

    Bear304inc New Member

    1,027
    0
    0
    I haven't used duracoat YET, but have a buddy did a couple of his guns with it and they look awesome. He says he didnt use the spray bottle that comes with it but a small hobby air brush kit he already had. Yet to see how it holds up to scratching, etc, but I'm going to use some on my 870 soon. I think OD green will look good.
     
  6. TheOldMan

    TheOldMan New Member

    1,014
    0
    0
    Don't ever use Krylon paint as a primary gun finish.. It will NOT hold up and will be a P.I.T.A. to clean up when it starts to flake off on ya. I use Duracoat ...
     
  7. lonewulff

    lonewulff New Member

    16
    0
    0
    It depends on what you do with it. I took a brand new remmy 700 sps varmint and krylon'd it end to end. Base coat was coyote tan ultra flat, then hit it random with some chocolate ultra flat, the used dog fennel, (local weeds to north florida) and used UF od green to make the camo pattern. True it chips and rubs off but the more it did, the better the camo pattern. FWIW just my take on it.
     
  8. TheOldMan

    TheOldMan New Member

    1,014
    0
    0
    There are several manufacturers out there making products designed specifically as firearms coatings.. Why even waste your money using an inferior product..? I used to use coat hangers as exhaust hangers years ago too before I realized that a smart quarter spent was better than a dime wasted ;)

    Point being, Duracoat and products like it are not cost prohibitive to the point of preventing you from doing the job right the first time.. A Duracoat camo kit is almost as cheap as the three or four cans of krylon and it will last "FOREVER"... !
     
    Last edited: Apr 12, 2012
  9. Axxe55

    Axxe55 The Apocalypse Is Coming.....

    7
    2
    0
    i actually have had pretty good results with the Krylon Camoflage paints, but only use them on the synthetic stocks. with many years with painting in the automotive business, the main factor is preparation not the material used. someone mentioned using a brake cleaner as a cleaner to use prior to painting, but rubbing alcohol works better, especially on plastics or synthetics, which you might not want to use brake cleaner on in the first place. also on synthetics and plastics, use a adhesion promoter before putting the paint on. these are my steps for painting, regardless of paint used.

    1. clean with warm soapy water and a course brush.

    2. completely dry.

    3. plastics or synthetics, use fine scuff pads to prep. metal, use mild abrasive in a blast cabinet if available, if not sandpaper or course steel wool.

    4. if plastic or synthetic, use rubbing alcohol to clean. if metal, use brake cleaner then alcohol to clean.

    5. if plastic or synthetic, use an adhesion promoter, i like the Bulldog brand usually carried at most automotive stores. then topcoat with whatever paint you choose. remember, more lighter coats are preferable to one heavy coat of paint.

    6. if metal. i like to preheat the metal. about 150-175 degrees. use an oven or a small torch, then when the metal has been warmed up apply very light coats until desired coverage is achieved.

    7. final note, let it cure. i use hangers made into hooks and holders for the items being painted if possible. move them if need be to where they can sit of hang for at least 24 hours before messing with them, more if you can.

    these are just my methods i have used for many years and have had good results with. i have several stocks with Krylon used on the stocks that are approaching a few years on them and are holding up very well. not peeling or flaking, but are getting some wear marks from handling, which if doing a camo paint finish, it actually gives it character.
     
  10. lonewulff

    lonewulff New Member

    16
    0
    0
    Like that old truck commercial said, scratches add character.
     
  11. orangello

    orangello New Member

    19,156
    0
    0
    I would love to see a photochop of Bob Ross hand-painting camo on a rifle... "happy little tree shape...". LOL!
     
  12. truggles

    truggles New Member

    43
    0
    0
    How rust preventive is painting a gun? Is this a good idea for a gun that will be outside a lot? What kind of barrel do you paint blues? Stainless? Nickel? Is it bad to paint any of these? Will the nickel and stainless be less likely to rust after paint than the blued, or will the paint make it not matter. How often do you "touch up" a painted gun? Sorry for all the questions just curious about the subject.
     
  13. TheOldMan

    TheOldMan New Member

    1,014
    0
    0
    LOL..Used to watch him on PBS all the time.. He's dead isn't he? Heard his son's carrying on the legacy though. But that guy had to have been smok'n some happy grass prior to filming those shows ( hehe ) just waaaay too laid back not to have been.
     
  14. TheOldMan

    TheOldMan New Member

    1,014
    0
    0
    No reason to paint a gun if you don't have to.. Most times you are doing it because you want to rather than having to. Stainless is not going to rust on you anyway. As long as you maintian your gun properly, you shouldn't have to refinish it at all. You may want to consider painting a gun if you live in a high humnidity environment or caostal areas where salt corrosion is a concern. But I stress again.. use a product specifically designed for the purpose.. Not something you'll have to redo again and again...:)
     
  15. ARdude

    ARdude New Member

    4
    0
    0
    Looking at using Duplicolor to refinish my AR furniture and receiver. It has a Stainless, 24 in bull bbl - that is the 'white' part...looking for a blue and a red to make my custom build 'unique'...any thoughts??? Thanx
     
  16. therewolf

    therewolf New Member

    8,409
    1
    0
    Whatever you do, don't use cheap spray paint.

    My method for camo is pretty simple. Use the plant green as the second

    coat, after the primer. Then use actual plants as stencils, using browns

    and lighter green, etc.

    I camo-ed my Mossberg 500, because birds in general have eyesight

    which is roughly as acute as a dog's sense of smell.
     
  17. therewolf

    therewolf New Member

    8,409
    1
    0
    You want to prime the entire AR a lighter color. Black will distort any

    color you paint it.
     
  18. big shrek

    big shrek Well-Known Member

    1,832
    44
    48
    Wasn't Krylon Flat Black was the receiver paint for Ruger 1022 & Marlin 60/70 series for a few decades...
    it can last...if sealed properly, which they did.

    That being said, there are far more durable choices.
    Just depends on how much you wanna pay ;)
     
  19. TINCANBANDIT

    TINCANBANDIT Member

    395
    16
    18
    I can't speak for the Marlin model 60, but the Ruger 10/22 went from Anodized aluminum receivers to a Teflon type coating to a powder coating, I'm pretty sure Krylon wasn't used at any point...