Painting a Ruger American.308

Discussion in 'General Rifle Discussion' started by Brittney, Jul 10, 2016.

  1. Brittney

    Brittney New Member

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    I have a .308 Ruger American that is very plain. I want to have an artist friend of mine paint a nightmare before Christmas scene on the stock. She will use durable outdoor paint and will then clear coat it. My husband has a few concerns that I can't answer. He feels it will lower the value of the gun. I feel it would increase the value. The cost to have her do it is anywhere from $100-$250 depending on how detailed I want it. His other concern is the clear coat will make it unusable. Does anyone have any thoughts?
     
  2. SSGN_Doc

    SSGN_Doc Well-Known Member

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    Custom paint jobs can lower value if they have a individualized appeal. To raise value if would needed apeal.

    Keeping paint on the stock only would not affect function. It still may not hold up well to a lot of outdoor active use, such as hunting. Another factor that can reduce value. I would keep non-fiream specific paints being used on the metal and moving parts.

    If this is a gun you never plan to sell, then monetary value doesn't really matter.
     

  3. primer1

    primer1 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Welcome to the forum. Feel free to find the introductions and tell us a bit about yourself.

    Painting: have you heard of duracoat and ceracoat? Both are durable and need no clearcoat to protect them.

    As far as value: from what I've seen paint on a firearm makes little difference on value, and might decrease it slightly. If you happen to find a buyer that really likes your paint, then it might increase the value.
     
  4. JTJ

    JTJ Well-Known Member Supporter

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  5. Triumphman

    Triumphman Active Member

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    One question is, is the stock plastic or wood?

    Just throwing on paints because they work with a few things doesn't necessarily makes those paints good for everything. You need the proper paints for the correct job, or you'll get bleeding, peeling, cracking, lifting up of whole paint scent.

    Plastic materials require plastic type primers, paints and clearcoats due to the different flexing properties compared to woods.

    I like the idea myself, but don't think it will make it increase in value unless the artist name is actually Tim Burton.

    Something I've seen before with wooden stocks, is a tattoo artist used his mad skills on his different guns. They were really sick --- in a VERY GOOD WAY.

    All done with a wood burning pencil set and all the different blades to give him outlining, shading, depth.

    If you know or can speak with some tatters, you might just get something that really will increase the value and be permanent, then give a good wood clear coating to protect.

    I can only say this technique was with hardwood stocks, because sanding is involved, so trying to do this in plastic just won't work.
     
  6. Brittney

    Brittney New Member

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    It is a plastic stock. The painting would be just on the stock. Also I hope not to sell but I had a 243 in muddy girl and the husband decided I needed a bigger caliber so I can't guarantee it won't be sold. He likes buying and selling. I don't. Lol. The lady that will paint it is a professional artist and is pretty amazing.
     
  7. Dallas53

    Dallas53 Well-Known Member

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    my two cents worth of opinion.

    just painting the stock will more than likely not decrease the value of the gun, as other than a cosmetic issue, will not detract from the rifle being functional and operating. but such custom touches will limit those interested in buying the gun if at some point in the future you decided to sell. and thinking it will increase the value, I highly doubt that, regardless of the artist you use. unless the artist is nationally or internationally famous, I doubt it will have increase in value of the gun.

    the type of clear coat used will make a huge difference. depends on how well it will adhere to the stock and also depends on what use the rifle will have. a rifle used primarily for range use, and the clear coat done correctly, it may last for many years. one used in the woods for hunting, not so much. that is why lots of people like using camo paint jobs in flat or satin type finishes for hunting rifles. they don't show scratches and such so much and are very easy to touch-up if needed.

    doing such a custom touch to a rifle is purely a person thing and one you will have to make the decision on. I can tell from a personal standpoint, that such a thing might deter some people from buying the rifle if you did decide to sell.
     
  8. JTJ

    JTJ Well-Known Member Supporter

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    As Triumphman said, painting plastic has its problems. There are specialized paints for plastic that bond to the plastic. Other paints will just flake or peel off. If it does not work or hold up you will have an expensive mess to deal with. You might consider painting a wrap like leather that can be removed when hunting or transferred to a different rifle. Leather paints quite well.
    Personally if I were looking at a rifle with that type of scene on it I would knock the price down considerably figuring I would have to clean up the stock or replace it and you are only talking about a $300 rifle to start with. Adding a $150 decorative paint job is akin to putting lipstick on a pig. The American is a utilitarian gun. If you want something fancier than put the $150 with it and trade up. Obviously I am siding with your husband. I have a 308 American but my stock is digital camo from the factory. I paid $300 for it new out the door. I did not want a fancy gun I had to be careful with. I have had my share of those.
     
    Last edited: Jul 10, 2016
  9. Rex in OTZ

    Rex in OTZ Well-Known Member

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    Your project sounds fun! :) :)

    Some different things Ive seen were air brushed on and clear coated.
    Others were engraved or etched.
    If it has meaning to you and yours, Id say do it. :)
     

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  10. jackrich3

    jackrich3 Active Member Supporter

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    Try some of the Rustoleum Glow-in-the-Dark paint. It really lights up at night!
     
  11. kfox75

    kfox75 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Keep an eye out for someone selling a factory stock after they upgraded theirs. Pick it up cheap, and then have the artwork done on that stock, saving the poriginal for range trips and display.
     
  12. Dallas53

    Dallas53 Well-Known Member

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    not a bad idea. an extra stock shouldn't be too much. maybe between $50-75 new, and maybe cheaper if a person can find one used.
     
  13. Sniper03

    Sniper03 Supporting Member Supporter

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    Brittney,

    The real value of the gun with your Christmas theme on it would be for your enjoyment. And not that it would be bad but it in all probability would reduce the value of the gun should you sell or trade it.
    But if there is no significant sanding or prep of the stock for the paint job I guess the paint could always be removed should you decide to sell or trade it.
    Of course if it is sanded it could not be returned to normal condition.

    Only my opinion since I have owned two gun shops in the past and been in the weapons industry since 2001.

    03
     
  14. hardluk1

    hardluk1 Active Member

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    Brittney its your rifle do what you wish to it . I'm not into refinishing a rifle but its not mine . You do have other options . Maybe a stock from Boyds will improve the looks of YOUR rifle or you could have a dip finish you like rather than a paint job . Not sure but I never buy a firearm with resale value in mind . Is till hunt with my first 308 bought in 1976 in stock condition .

    Holographic finish - http://www.kc-coatings.com/Camogundipping.html
    Do it your self - http://camodipkit.com/
     
  15. kfox75

    kfox75 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    And as to removing the paint if you go to sell it, if it's a synthetic stock, brake fluid. Pour it on, and let it sit, won'y hurt the stock it's self, then follow up with some dish soap and water, then rinse and dry.

    I just say get another stock, so if you decide to sell it, you can simply remove the barrel and action from the fancy stock, and put it in the other one, then maybe turn the painted one into a Christmas Lamp. Some EMT Tubing, a nice base, and a lamp head and shade, you would have a unique bit of decor, long after the rifle has gone on to it's next owner.
     
    Last edited: Jul 16, 2016
  16. Txhillbilly

    Txhillbilly Active Member

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    I wouldn't worry about lowering the value of that rifle,it is after all,an entry level rifle that doesn't have any future of gaining value.
    Most paints that artist use aren't going to be durable when it comes to the rifle getting used in the field regularly. There are durable paints available,but they may not come in the colors you desire. You could always take the painted rifle to a car painter and have it clear coated with a good durable clear coat automotive paint.
     
  17. Hookeye

    Hookeye Active Member

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    I have painted a few plastic stocks camo, shot with clear. Held up great and when I decided to put them back to original, a roll of paper towels and some acetone.

    Not fun, but was able to get all that paint off with no problem.
    If you do leave it a bit streaky, you could just paint it black.

    My 700 has a paintjob that's pushing 5 yrs. has about 4 coats of clear on it.
    Looks like brand new.

    The issue is topography. The flatter the design, the better it should hold up with clearcoat.

    Cerakote and maybe other stuff might be too permanent.
     
  18. Hookeye

    Hookeye Active Member

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    Clear coat unusable?
    I killed deer with my camo TC, used clearcoat over the sponge painted camo.
    Yeah the clearcoat adds some sheen, but not really shine.
    Certainly not as flat as the camo paint itself...........but I used a matte clear and found it entirely fine for hunting.

    The clearcoat is some stinky stuff when applying. And if you aren't careful you could get it milky and ruin the whole job.
     
  19. Dallas53

    Dallas53 Well-Known Member

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    the first consideration when painting a plastic or synthetic stock is preparation. and that first step is absolute cleanliness. when you think it's clean enough, clean it some more.

    with most plastic or factory synthetic stocks, you are going to need to use an adhesion promoter. Bulldog makes the best one I have tried. it can usually be found at any places that sell paint and autobody supplies. use it per the directions.

    another key factor is to use multiple light coats, rather than one heavy coat. the paint used is for the most part irrelevant if the prep work was done properly.

    personally, I do a lot camo type paintjobs on my synthetic stocks. I use the Krylon Ultra Flat camo paints and they hold up very well and are easy to touch if they do get scratched up.
     
  20. Dallas53

    Dallas53 Well-Known Member

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    for a hunting rifle, if a person wanted to use a clearcoat, I would recommend using a satin finish or matte clear. they aren't near as shiny when they dry.

    but personally, I find that if the proper preparation is done before and during painting, the clearcoat isn't really necessary IMO. it will hold up.

    for field or hunting use, it's not about looking pretty in the first place. it's suppose to be about stealth.