opinion on purchasing used gun at pawn shop

Discussion in 'General Handgun Discussion' started by endobro, Feb 18, 2014.

  1. endobro

    endobro New Member

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    As the title says what's your opinion. Used is used after all. What needs to be inspected.

    What kind of price should I look to pay below new price. How much do minor dings subtract from value to you guys.
     
  2. Gonzilla

    Gonzilla New Member

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    IMO - the problem w pawn shops is they often pay pennies on the dollar and then try to sell it for MSRP. It is not uncommon to see used guns selling for more than new.

    Not sure if this is due to ignorance or greed. You can look up the book value or simply run a search on the major gun websites like GunsAmercia etc and see how much the new & used guns are selling for. You can check out the pictures and compare the condition of the gun relative to the price.

    Make sure you read the fine print - restocking fees and for "what reason or rationale" can you return the item. Most pawn shops only guarantee it will go bang.
     

  3. Axxe55

    Axxe55 The Apocalypse Is Coming.....

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    Gonzilla is correct. in the town near where i live there are two pawn shops. one i won't do business with simply because of the stated reasons as Gonzilla posted. selling used at new or close to new prices.

    the other one, i have bought several and gotten some really decent prices on them. some pawn shops will be glad to give a discount when you are buying. they know making a deal and selling the gun make them money and it sitting in their rack doesn't.

    be prepared to haggle, especially if you have cash money. money talks, BS walks. take someone knowledgeable about the types of guns you are interested in, if you aren't sure of what to look for when buying used. don't let emotion rule your buying decision.
     
  4. endobro

    endobro New Member

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    Can I get a break down on what to check for in a used gun mechanics wise.
     
  5. therewolf

    therewolf New Member

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    Two things to consider about pawn shop guns :

    1.-Why didn't it's last owner take it to a LGS?

    2.So many people rush into a pawn shop assuming

    they are getting a discount, when they are not.


    Carefully check the rifling of the barrel,

    the overall condition and finish, and especially around the

    receiver and chamber for undue wear or cracks. A few extra

    minutes before you buy can save you a lot of

    grief later.

    It also helps to know the values of what you are

    looking for. I'd advise bringing someone with you

    with more experience.
     
    Last edited: Feb 18, 2014
  6. Rick1967

    Rick1967 Well-Known Member

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    The things to look at for a revolver will be very different from an auto. If it is an auto and you know how to take it apart, do so if they will let you. If they will not let you disassemble to check internals...walk away. With a revolver check for proper lock up. Pull the hammer back. Check for movement in the cylinder. Pull the trigger. Does the hammer fall free? Release the trigger. Does the hammer back away from the frame like it should? Now pull the hammer back again. Hold the hammer while pulling the trigger. Lower the hammer a little bit and release the trigger. Watch the transfer bar as you lower the hammer with the trigger released. The transfer bar should go down so the hammer does not strike it. Does it do that? Take an unsharpened pencil. Pull the hammer back. The cylinder should be locked up. Put the pencil in the barrel. Feel the edge of the barrel and cylinder where they meet. Are they lined up properly? If not you could have a timing problem. Walk away.

    There are a lot of things to check. Always check the proper operation of all safeties. If a pawn shop will not let you do these checks...walk away.
     
  7. nitestalker

    nitestalker New Member

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    Damaged fire arms that would be almost impossible to sell often go to Pawn Shops. Pawn operators just look up the value in the Blue Book and offer a loan. The person pawing the firearm has no intention of retrieving it.
    I have seen more firearms with mechanical problems in Pawn Shops than any where else.:(
     
  8. Axxe55

    Axxe55 The Apocalypse Is Coming.....

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    sometimes people pawn guns because they are in a bind and need money and most pawn shops if they have an FFL will buy guns and loan money on a pawn for a gun. sometimes people pawn rather than sell, because they hope to get it back. sometimes life gets in the way, and it doesn't turn out that way though.

    sometimes people just can't afford to get their guns out of pawn and after a certain period of time they belong to the pawn shop.

    i have seen pure junk at pawn shops with like new prices, and i have seen some nice ones with decent prices as well. a lot of it depends on the pawn shop and how they conduct business.
     
  9. Mercator

    Mercator New Member

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    The checklist will vary depending on the kind of gun. I think your best bet is to bring someone with experience whom you trust. It might also save you money.
     
  10. Rick1967

    Rick1967 Well-Known Member

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    Pawn shops are tricky. You could get an awesome deal. Or you could get totally taken. You really need to know what you are doing.
     
  11. Rick1967

    Rick1967 Well-Known Member

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    If you do not know what you are looking for...go to a reputable gun dealer. If you buy a nice gun but spend $50 too much for it, you will eventually forget how much you spent. That is because you will enjoy shooting a good gun. But if you buy a crap gun, no matter how cheap it was...you will never be happy with it.
     
  12. jjones45

    jjones45 New Member

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    It seems you may be a little new to handguns so I would take a more gun knowledgable person with me to help out or buy from a honest lgs who will stand behind their sale. But really it all about who you're dealing with. A pawn shop could be a good friend or worst enemy, depends who's behind the counter. You might want to take a gun class as well, you might learn some things


    Sent from my iPhone using Firearms Talk
     
  13. Gonzilla

    Gonzilla New Member

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    The bitterness of poor quality will remain long after the sweetness of low cost has faded from memory. There is an easier axiom to remember - buy once, cry once. :)

    When in doubt - DDI - "Don't Do It." Best advice I can give & then you don't have the ethical dilemma of how do you sell the POS. My gunsmith used to say, "Don't sell it local" as he didn't want to see it end up on his bench twice.
     
  14. SSGN_Doc

    SSGN_Doc Well-Known Member

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    Depends on the pawn shop. There were two pawn shops that i would go to to look for used guns, when I was back in Georgia. There were people at the gun counter who knew guns, and were reasonable to talk with. They got to know me and that i was a "gun guy". One of the shops knew that I liked to get a gun from time to time thta may need some bit of work. I would walk in and the owner would say "Have I got a project for you to check out". I bought a beat up Marlin 336, a Springfield 1911 that was a box of incomplete parts, and a spray painted WASR 10/63 from them, because the price we agreed on reflected the amount of work I was going to have to put back into the guns. Never felt like I got a raw deal from them, but I always had a pretty good idea of exactly what I was getting myself into, before making the deal.

    The other shop got nice guns in from time to time, and the owner was more particular about what he would buy. He bought low and sold at fair market value. Again, never felt like I got a bad deal from him either.

    The key is knowing what you are looking at. Also knowing how to recognize a problem, and put a value on fixing it, helps in negotiating. If I went in and said, this is a good gun, but the front sight is missing and a gunsmith will charge me $50 to put a new one on, and the barrel bushing is missing, and so is the grip safety, and grip screw bushings, and those parts run $x and will take x hours from a gunsmith, it makes for a better negotiating.
     
  15. nchunt101

    nchunt101 New Member

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    I personally love pawn shops. I learned how to shop them by a friend years ago. The trick is to save your $$$ till you have a set amount of cash to spend on a gun and shop around. Also if you are new to guns take a friend who knows values etc. I never know what I might buy at a pawn shop till I see something I like. Know How to haggle---you will never get a good deal without haggling at a pawn shop. The worst thing the owner can say is no and cash on a table is a good way of making them say yes. The last gun I bought at a pawn shop was a somewhat comestically challenge Mini-14 for 250 out the door. The owner of the shop probally loaned some one $150 for the gun and they never claimed it. Even though he had a orignal price of 375 on it he still made a hundred bucks. The key to pawn shop owners success is quick turnover. Sorry to be longwinded.
     
  16. chloeshooter

    chloeshooter New Member

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    More than half my firearms are used, as are all the cars I buy. I figure, let someone else over-pay - the second you fire the first shot it's a used gun!

    if you have done your homework upfront, used guns from a pawn shop or any other source can be an excellent deal. start by searching the web for 'price for used _ _ _". There is typically a lot of good information. Also go to gunbroker.com and see what your make/model is selling for. It is where most re-sellers will go to get a grip on the prices they should be offering

    second, see what information is available about your firearm in terms of any common complaints, recalls etc. You can also call the manufacturer with the serial number and typically find out what year it was made.

    inspect the bore and the barrel. are there nicks or marks on the crown? (if you want it bad enough you can get it re-crowned if it's a rifle, and use the condition as a bargaining tool).

    just a few thoughts. good luck!
     
  17. endobro

    endobro New Member

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    Thanks guys. This is some good info. Specifically im interested in a px4 compact and have done a good amount of research. I could field strip one right now if I had it in my hands. Sounds like I might check the shops out but I will definitely be careful before I consider purchasing. I also have an idea of what I will spend for something used and I will not buy used if new is only $50 more.
     
  18. orangello

    orangello New Member

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    Around here, there aren't many LGS; there is Walmart, and there are pawn shops and a very few sporting goods stores with firearms. I have had good luck with pawn shops for used pistols. I have found that dealing with the same person/shop regularly is a good way to get a better deal; it also seems to help to have a wingman with you to critique the pistol so YOU don't look as nitpicky yourself.

    If you can't find the deal you want locally, check for a online deal and a local FFL to do the transfer (there is a list on gunbroker).
     
  19. Bob Wright

    Bob Wright Member

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    I'm pretty savvy on revolvers, so I know what to look for. And I know how to correct some problems that others might have to take to a 'smith for repairs.

    For me, it the gun cycles, that is cocks, rotates and locks the cylinder, the bore looks good, wood stocks are in good shape, I'll buy it for a reasonable amount.

    I'll pay $300 ~ $400 for a good Three Screw Ruger .357 Magnum, unconverted. Converted, drops to $200 price range.

    I recently saw a Super Blackhawk Three Screw, asking $700. When I examined, saw it had been converted, dropped my offer to $250. My offer not accepted, so walked away.

    Recently bought a pristine Hy Hunter .357 Magnum, $300 OTD. This at a pawn shop.

    Bob Wright