Opening a range

Discussion in 'Range Report' started by reapertoreese08, Apr 10, 2011.

  1. reapertoreese08

    reapertoreese08 New Member

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    My friend and I are planning on opening a range in South Dakota, thinking its going to be an indoor and outdoor range. Any suggestions as to favorite features of a range?
     
  2. fireguy

    fireguy New Member

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    Reaper, head on over to the introductions section and tell us something about yourself, it's a common courtesy here as well as many other forums.
    Good to have new members.

    I'm in KS, so I don't know anything about SD laws, someone will chime in who has some experience, I'm sure. This place is loaded with knowledgeable people.
     

  3. wmille01

    wmille01 New Member

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    hi, two things I really love about the range I go to is the to and fro targets (you know set up on a pullie and what not) and the pop shooting gallerie with all the steel targets they have pistol and rifle targets.
     
  4. BlindOldMan

    BlindOldMan New Member

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    Indoor range? Never seen this outside of a bowling alley, but having those cool air hand dryers on each lane would be nice :D Also, low light lanes and timers would be interesting.

    Outdoor range? A wind speed/direction indicator, elevated stands to practice shooting downwards, sandbag and mat rental...
     
  5. 7point62

    7point62 Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    What he said :D...and a 500 to 1000 yard range if you have the land, and a gun & run AR course.
     
  6. Car54

    Car54 New Member

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    If you have the room, an A.C.T.S. course. Moving and shooting is F U N

    Sample Stage
     
  7. Jesse17

    Jesse17 New Member

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    A free to use Chrono. :D

    I've always wanted to do a gun and run! Gonna try my hand at USPSA in a couple months when I get my new gun tuned in.:)
     
  8. reapertoreese08

    reapertoreese08 New Member

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    thanks for the ideas, have any of you ever heard of cardboard box targets that have a balloon inside of them. the target is mounted on some kind of rail and bobs and weaves as it approaches the shooter, the shooter doesnt know where the balloon is and needs to shoot it in order to defeat the target. ive only seen it once but i cant remember where and i also can find a vid or anything about it, but it would be an awsome simulator to have.
     
  9. headhunter

    headhunter Member

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    I would look to the NRA, not only for range plans but insurance. Best of luck!
     
  10. pandamonium

    pandamonium New Member

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    One feature that is always good is firearm rentals, for those new to shooting and for others to try before you buy.
     
  11. Entelzha

    Entelzha New Member

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    Figure out how many exhaust fans you will need and then add two more
     
  12. Ruzai

    Ruzai New Member

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    Reaper, I've been thinking of doing a gunshop/indoor range near where I live, (in several years of course) it seems to be a wide market for it where I am. I've asked around and many say reactive targets would be the best things to have. Punching paper is fun and all but steel shooting has its advantages as well. While they are expensive targets for a first time buy for a range they do pay for themselves in time because of the fun factor.
    Be sure to talk with law enforcement about it, see what they have to say about it, you ever know, you may make some friends and contacts that can help you with the legal and endorsement for your endeavor.
     
    Last edited: Apr 18, 2011
  13. utf59

    utf59 New Member

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    I saw an episode of "The Best Defense" where the host detailed how to build those and showed them in use at the range. In this case, though, the balloon was in a predictable location because it was designed to replicate the heart/lung area. They also did a version with just a string or piece of cord holding the target up. The cord ran the length of the target (torso size) and represented the spinal column. Both targets would fall once the balloon/cord had been hit, the idea being that these would/could be "stopping" hits.

    The targets were shaped like human torsos with the same approximate height, width and thickness. One of the advantages here was that the target might present itself at an angle rather than straight on. Not only did that make a smaller target, it also changed the relative location of the vital spots.
     
  14. Vikingdad

    Vikingdad New Member

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    At our local range they have plenty of sandbags to go around (and then some) free of charge, they use old shot bags full of sand and sewn shut and they keep them in big Rubbermaid bins behind the benches. The shooting benches on the rifle range are concrete and I am told they are bench-rest competition spec (I don't know any more than I am told that) but are far superior to wooden. There is also space between benches for prone, sitting etc. shooting.

    Selling ammo, targets, glasses, ear protection, etc. at competitive (or even cheaper if you can) prices will generate a LOT of sales. Don't gouge your customers. Bad for business. If people can drive directly to the range without having to stop at Wally World or the local gun shop to get supplies you will benefit from that.

    Above all, safety first, but do NOT allow any of your range safety officers to treat your customers badly. No lording over the customers. I have been to ranges where the safety officers will scream and yell at you if you make a minor mistake (like forgetting to open the action on a gun in the rack) when a simple and polite "would you please open the action on this firearm?" would do. Yelling at and belittling people just pisses them off. Bad form. There are times at a gun range where the range safety officers must be very firm, or even if a shooter is being told he must leave, but it can be done respectful0ly and politely. There are exceptions of course, but as a general rule be respectful and polite.
     
  15. Ruzai

    Ruzai New Member

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    +1 on the polite attitude on both employees and range officers.
    If its an indoor range, look at getting good backstops that can withstand heavy magnum rounds. Because you know there is always going to be those people with the biggest gun they can buy.
    I know some indoor ranges have to test the ammo you are going to shoot with a magnet because the cheaper rounds with steel in them tends to ruin the backstops after a while.
    My first indoor range visit in Fayettevile, Arkansas a few years ago was no where near as enjoyable as it could be because the guy that owned it was a real ass-wipe to me and my family. At the time I wasnt aware of why he had to test my ammo with a magnet and he got offended at me asking and got real rude when I had to ask any other questions about procedure. He said the ammo I was using could be "armor piercing" or something if its magnetic but it was simple TulaAmmo 45acps from Wally World.
    My point here is to have clear and concise rules, instructions, and procedures posted in plain view in several places. This will reduce the amount of times you have explain things to people and have something to fall back on when/if someone doesnt follow them and you have to ask them to leave.