One in chamber

Discussion in 'General Handgun Discussion' started by 11Handicap, Jan 20, 2012.

  1. 11Handicap

    11Handicap New Member

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    Am new to fireaems and will most likely only carry without one in chamber. Is this a sticky topic here? Possibly i may move on to the other way i dont know. I need to just get used to having it on me, and not be worried so mush about an AD. I dont mind if u jump on me a bit, but please remember not everyone has 20 years CCW experience. I have none. Ane am new to firearms all together, its not that i am afraid of my weapon but i am afraid of an AD from lack of experince drawing especially from a concealed holster. I am practicing with a blue gun. Lets hear it please
     
  2. DodgerBlue

    DodgerBlue New Member

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    Don't worry dude. When I first started carrying I never had one in the chamber. And yes some big shots will say "carry loaded or don't carry" and other stupid stuff.

    Get used it at your pace. Take it to the range fire it and learn its habits and trigger pull. A stiff trigger is a good safety in itself. Once you shoot and get more confidence with the weapon itself. So will you feel better about carrying loaded.

    I now carry loaded all the time.

    I am new to the 1911 and am having to re-learn loaded carry all over again. Cause it sure is different!

    What are you carrying BTW?
     
    Last edited: Jan 20, 2012

  3. Rick1967

    Rick1967 Well-Known Member

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    I carry one in the chamber. I feel like if I had to fight someone off with one hand my polymer gun will make a poor club if I am unable to rack the slide.

    Keep in mind, if you accidentally pull the trigger that is not an accidental discharge. That is technically called a negligent discharge.

    There are a lot of people that carry an empty chamber. I am not one of them. But I do not rag people for their personal decisions. That is a decision that you have to make for yourself.
     
  4. trip286

    trip286 New Member

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    You do whatever you need to become comfortable while carrying. If for some reason pink shoe laces and a purple hat make you comfortable, get some of those too. It is better to be comfortable, than to be semi afraid of your own gun.

    By the way, what gun are you packing? Some of us may be able to help you with your anxiety of carrying plus one.

    Another thing to remember- Practice, Practice, Practice.
     
  5. 11Handicap

    11Handicap New Member

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    I am carrying a ruger SR9C, i like it alot. It will take time. Hell i dont like having keys in my pocket, a pistol feels like a truck. By the way i do wear pink golf shoes:) yes sir
     
  6. Rick1967

    Rick1967 Well-Known Member

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    You might try practicing drawing your real weapon instead of the fake one. Just make sure that it is empty. Rack the slide act as if it is loaded. Practice practice practice. I was worried about carrying my 1911 cocked and locked. So I spent a full day with my empty gun on my hip with the hammer back and the safety on. I felt pretty good at the end of the day when the safety was still on. Just be sure to empty your gun completely if you are going to practice your draw.

    If you are still not comfortable carrying one in the chamber then don't. And dont let anyone intimidate you into doing something you are not ready for.
     
  7. trip286

    trip286 New Member

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    Disregard the gun, look at the slippers!

    ForumRunner_20120120_231010.jpg


    I don't know anything about your particular model, but there are those here who do, if you can track some of them down, they may have some tips and pointers that may help you.
     
  8. rigjumpr

    rigjumpr New Member

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    already you have Gotten some very good information, as trip has pointed out there are some that will tell carry loaded or not at all well…….I’m not one of them. You say you’re practicing this I agree with but, are you practicing correctly? with a blue gun is safe yes, Take the time and a little bit of money to get proper training. live round down range.
     
    Last edited: Jan 21, 2012
  9. 11Handicap

    11Handicap New Member

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    Great advise thank you. I have practiced a fair amount with my weapon empty and safe. I was suprised at hard it was to draw and rack the slide effectivly, with out getting sideways. I started very slowly. When i go to reach for weapon with my right hand i take my left hand to mid chest at same time. Draw weapon with good grip role it forward bringing it arond to my upper belly height. Rack the slide and than my left hand joins it and i move from a chest ready position extending straight out. I am very particular about my grip and presenting it properly. I dont care how slow i am right now, i played sports all my life and i know practice will bring more speed and more confidence. Any thoughts??
     
  10. Paperpuncher

    Paperpuncher New Member

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    It took me about 3 months to start carrying with one in the pipe. Learn, practice and take it slow, you'll lose your fear and become more comfortable.
     
  11. sweeper22

    sweeper22 New Member

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    Having a gun with a "yet to be chambered" round surely trumps not having a firearm at all.

    That said, I have always and will always carry with a round in the chamber, regardless of what model I choose to carry. At some point you'll probably end up doing the same. A proper holster can alleviate a great deal of ND risks, as can finding a carry gun with safety features (like the no-brainer XD/Xdm grip safety) that may provide a little extra piece of mind.

    Make your own decisions. But do take time to carefully reflect on why you carry. Imagine the senarios that you'd hope to best be prepared for, weigh the hypotheticals...and then factor in the practicality of racking the slide in said situations...the time it takes, the noise it makes, the attention it calls to you, etc.
     
  12. Hookeye

    Hookeye Active Member

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    If the gun is on me, it has one chambered.
     
  13. Shoobee

    Shoobee New Member

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    If you don't want to load a round in the chamber, then you should go with a revolver.

    A semi-auto without a round in the chambre takes two hands to load. That could be a problem.

    For a semi-auto, loading one in the chamber, and then putting the hammer onto half-cock is the safest and fastest method of carry.

    For handguns without an exposed hammer, you can't do this. That's why you should not buy a semi-auto without an exposed hammer. That's also why you should not buy a glock or other cheap half-plastic gun.
     
  14. Shoobee

    Shoobee New Member

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    Agreed. Agreed.
     
  15. phburks

    phburks New Member

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    Not sure if I agree on the half-cock position being the safest. Maybe it depends on the firearm, but isn't the half cock position supposed to CATCH the hammer if its unintentionally released (by human or mechanical error)? Then again maybe I don't fully understand the half cock feature.

    As for glocks, etc, though your opinion is noted and I'm sure shared by some, I feel 100% confident with my "cheap half plastic" XD and have no qualms about the safetiness of carrying it with one in the chamber. Just my opinion. Do what works best for you and makes you feel comfortable with carrying.
     
  16. utf59

    utf59 New Member

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    Personally, I always carry with one in the chamber. But carrying a gun is supposed to be comforting, and if one in the chamber makes you antsy, then don't carry that way. Like many others here, I think that over time you might change your mind, but it's your mind. :)

    If you search the Internet for "Israeli pistol technique" or "Israeli pistol draw," you'll find a lot of discussion on how to deploy a semiautomatic that's carried without a round in the chamber.

    A good holster built for your specific gun will keep the gun from being discharged while it's in the holster. Nearly all guns manufactured in the last couple of decades (maybe longer) have been engineered so they don't go off if they're dropped. Many guns are designed with grip safeties and/or "safe action triggers" to help prevent negligent discharges. And many guns also have triggers that require a very firm trigger pull to activate.

    The last part of the equation is the user. As you spend more time practicing with your gun, you'll get more confident in your own skills and more familiar with what it takes to actually fire the gun. Since you're already practicing and are conscientious enough to spend so much thought and effort on safe gun handling, I have no doubt that you will one day feel at home carrying either with a chambered round or without.
     
  17. JTJ

    JTJ Well-Known Member Supporter

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    The Ruger SR9c has a thumb safety. As long as the safety is engaged you will not have a negligent discharge while holstering. You do need to learn proper handling technique so you keep your finger off the trigger and dont disengage the safety before you are ready to fire. Get comfortable and build some skills then you will be able to carry safely.
     
  18. Paladin201

    Paladin201 New Member

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    I'm one of those "idiots" who will tell you that you should carry with a round chambered.

    If you need that gun to save your life or that of a loved one, chances are good that you will need it in a hurry. And racking the slide is something that will take time you may not have. Also, you have to consider the state of your mind and body in that situation. Far too many people believe that when they are faced with a life or death situation that they will meet it cooly, calmly and every action will be guided by rational thought. Nonsense. That may work for highly trained professionals like soldiers and LEOs, but even then, ask the average cop what kind of state he was in the first time he was in a real shooting situation. Chances are he'll tell you he was a basket case. And you will be too. The average person who finds themselves in that situation will go to pieces. I've talked to a person who's been through it. He can't even remember drawing the gun, much less using it. It's all a blur. I just believe when the time comes you simply won't have the mental faculties or coordination to chamber a round. Either you'll forget completely and end up pointing an empty gun at the bad guy. Or you'll end up fumbling around with the gun, trying to rack the slide with hands that have turned to mush. You may even drop the gun. Or you'll rack the slide with your finger on the trigger and end up firing a round when you didn't intend to, with possible disastrous consequences.

    Having said that, I'm NOT trying to pressure anyone into doing something they don't want to do. You have to go with what you are comfortable with. If carrying a gun with a chambered round gives you the willy's, then you shouldn't. But if that's your decision....and it is YOUR decision. Then I urge you to practice, practice, practice. Take an unloaded gun and drill with it, drawing and racking the slide. Do it until its drilled into your head and you can do it without thought. Train until it becomes an unconscious act.

    Sorry, that's just my opinion.
     
  19. mcb

    mcb New Member

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    Just because you don't like Glocks doesn't make them cheap junk.
    The Glock trigger is designed not to go off unless intentionally pulled. The idiots that shoot themselves in the leg are exactly that.
    Since a Glock doesn't cock until you pull the trigger you don't have to worry about half cock, full cock, or thumbing a safety when SHTF.
     
  20. JTJ

    JTJ Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Ever hear the term "Going off half cocked"? Guess where that came from. Half cocked is not a safe method of carry.