One for all you toxicologists out there

Discussion in 'AR-15 Discussion' started by rmena, Jan 23, 2012.

  1. rmena

    rmena New Member

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    So my wife is having her first baby and like most dads I want a non defective healthy child. That being said, it occurred to me that the fumes given off by stronger gun cleaning solvents required to get off the really blackest blacks of a well used ar15 could be detrimental to the kids health both in the womb as well as after it is born (I know if I don't vent well I get a headache from the fumes). So what do you guys think? what have you heard on the subject?
     
  2. Quentin

    Quentin New Member

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    Yeah, mom and her precious cargo shouldn't be exposed to those kinds of fumes and of course smoke. Why not be 100% safe and clean the guns in the garage or over at a buddy's house.

    And make sure your wife takes all her vitamins and supplements! If she's not taking daily two or three quality fish oil capsules high in EPA/DHA, start doing that now.
     

  3. rmena

    rmena New Member

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    haha...yeah she takes her prenatals. Are there any nontoxic alternatives that will work?
     
  4. winds-of-change

    winds-of-change The Balota's Staff Member

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    I doubt it. Just do your gun cleaning while she is out running errands or when she's not home. Then immediately take the garbage out where you threw your gun cleaning patches and open a window for a few minutes. That should take care of the smell.
     
  5. trip286

    trip286 New Member

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    Don't worry about safe alternatives, do what WOC says, just keep it the hell away from your woman.

    If you have a cat, that's now your responsibility too. Along with cleaning if you're like me and you like that clean bleach smell.
     
  6. mrm14

    mrm14 Active Member

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    I know Hopps cleaners really stinks up the house and the smell, although kind of cool, can linger for days. I don't think it's so good for little kids and pregnant mothers. When my grand kids and their mother, with a newborn, were staying here is about when I found out about Sharp Shoot R Precision Products copper cleaner called Wipe-Out and their carbon cleaner called Carb-Out. Seemed to stop everyone from *****ing about smell. The Wipe out is a foam bore cleaner and has no noticable smell. I let it soak overnight and then scrub out the bore with a nylon brush and patch dry. Stuff really works good. I also use the Carb-Out but it does have a bit of an order, however, not near as strong as Hopps. Clean guns in garage now and keep even this stuff away from little kids.
     
    Last edited: Jan 24, 2012
  7. AgentTikki

    AgentTikki New Member

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    Q....either you got a lot of kids and grandkids, or mebbe you were a midwife in a past life. :p
     
  8. AgentTikki

    AgentTikki New Member

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    for non toxic, I hear good things about Gunzilla. expensive tho.....
     
  9. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    Bag all used patches, wipedown rags, etc, trash them outside, then go wash good with soap and water. You are picking up lead on your skin from the gun, and it transfers to things you touch. Not only from bullets, but primers are mainly lead azide.

    Not much, but there is no PEL for lead for unborn children.
     
  10. Chainfire

    Chainfire Well-Known Member Supporter

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    C3 nailed my concern as well. You bring a lot of lead home from the range on your skin and clothes. Lead is a nasty chemical for children, born or unborn. Your best bet is to be as careful as possible with all contaminates. Don't take chances.
     
  11. Quentin

    Quentin New Member

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    Man there's quite a body of knowledge on this site concerning almost any subject! <thumbs up!>
     
  12. Balota

    Balota ... but I used to play keyboards.

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    See the thread "Training A Toddler". What started as a description of an irresponsible parent letting their toddler play with a gun in a gun store turned into some pretty useful information about lead poisoning, range ventilation, etc.

    Some of the products of the lead based primer igniting become lead salts that can be absorbed through the skin. The residue that deposits on your face and hands can get into your food and become a serious problem. Worse yet is the potential for that residue to affect your pregnant wife and the baby.

    Not exactly on point with respect to the gun cleaning solvents, but relevant for your family.
     
  13. robocop10mm

    robocop10mm Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    Lead is an issue for small children. Lead is a relatively large molecule that can be absorbed into the system 3 ways

    1. Injestion. You eat it. This is the most efficient (most dangerous) methof of absorbtion. The body has a lot of time to draw it in from the digestive tract.

    2. Inhalation. You breathe it. Microscopic particles get into the lungs. There is some chance of it geting into the blood stream, but not as high as injestion. The lungs are made for small molecules like Oxygen and Carbon Dioxide to pass through. Lead is a much larger molecule.

    3. Absorption. It passes through the skin. Once again the lead molecule is too large for ready absorption. Avoid picking up used brass in your ball cap as your scalp can absorb lead more readily than your hands can (callouses).

    Your body mistakes lead for calcium and deposits it on the bones. If you shoot, reload, cast bullets you should ask your doctor to test for lead in your system at your annual physical. The test is cheap and most insurance companies allow it w/o question. A lead level less than 20 is good (obviously the lower the better). Over 30 and they will start treatment. I have had mine tested every year for the last 10 years or so. My levels were 6 until recently when they dropped to 4 (metamucil is a wonderful thing). I shoot, work the police qualification range, reload and cast bullets so I must be doing something right.

    Very important you wash your hands with cool water very well after handling any lead contaminated articles. After shooting, wash your clothing separate from the babies clothes and maybe even run a load between your clothes and the baby's clothes. Remember, your shoes/boots you wore at the range are contaminated too. Do not wear them into the house as you can track lead contaminants thoughout the house that the baby can crawl through, get on hands and subsequently eat.
     
  14. Durangokid

    Durangokid New Member

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    I think my mother was exposed to gun oil powder and bore cleaners. It has caused me to have with drwals all my life. The only cure is to buy another gun or shoot something.:rolleyes:
     
  15. rmena

    rmena New Member

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    wow! thanks for all the tips. I will start implementing those. I guess I have a date with the space heater and garage this weekend.
     
  16. Quentin

    Quentin New Member

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    And of course you know you don't *have* to clean guns anyway. Shoot 'em clean! :D
     
  17. AgentTikki

    AgentTikki New Member

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    Blow the Carbon out of them!
     
  18. rmena

    rmena New Member

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    I found a cleaner that gets my guns clean really quickly but melts my gloves! lol. A bit strong? perhaps....
     
  19. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    There are gloves, and there are gloves. Regular medical type gloves are latex, and degrade very quickly with petroleum products (that's why condoms and vaseline are a bad mix).

    Gloves can also be PVC, Nitrile, Butyl, etc. Read the label on the product.
     
  20. linuxuser3890

    linuxuser3890 New Member

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    My fiancee said you may just have to live with a dirty gun for a while.

    I think this could be an excellent opportunity for a few reliability experiments.

    Sent from my Inspire 4G using FirearmsTalk