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Buy a gun safe and the dings multiply.
Dings on wooden stocks: How about 50mm scopes with huge knobs. How many gun safes were designed to accomadate these large scopes. My old safe ,for sure, is not designed for such. A ding from a knurled knob in the middle of checkering is especially nice. This ding will give me something to work on.
 

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There hasn't been improvement in the practical functionally of a bolt action rifle since the invention of the Mauser in 1898. The extra value of older rifles is that, many times, they have a history. For some folks that is no value at all. I just wonder if 125 years from now, someone will be lovingly cleaning and carefully storing, a plastic rifle. Who know, they may be.

Touche. Possibly. "One man's trash is another man's treasure."
 

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I got two favorite old hunting rifles. Both these guns are in good repair and shootable. The one I have the longest is a Remington Model 81 in 300 Savage made in 1945. There other is a 1939 vintage Remington 141 pump rifle in 35 Remington. This rifle has a Ajack scope in Jaeger side mount. Nice old rifles that have be to some degree spoiled by being drilled and tapped. No plastic and super workmanship. I can load for both cartridges. The old Remington 721 in 300 H&H is to be shot tomorrow. These old rifles are a trip!
 

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While I really enjoy hardwood and blued steel the most, I am not offended by decent composite stocks and black coatings. What I dislike is the flimsy Tupperware like stocks that a lot of entry level rifles have from the factory (ie: Savage Axis and Ruger American and others).
I am not that fond of polymer framed pistols either, but they function reasonably and are lighter for ease of carry and more economical. But, yes, I like steel framed pistols!
 

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Some of my hunt rifles are wood and blue, i do appreciate lighter and handier though.
A good coat of wax will protect any steel and wood for a hunt.
Pic of my old 760 waxed up before a hunt last year.
20190917_115145.jpg
 

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I think I have one rifle left with a wood stock and it is a laminate. I have a Stoeger coach gun with walnut stock and it had to be replaced. It was evidently not dry enough and as it dried the butt plate screws split the stock. Luckily it only cost me shipping as they replaced it under warranty. My Marlin 1894CS went to a grandson for Christmas. Another grandson got my Ruger SS Blackhawk 357. It had wood grips. I know they will never sell them and they might even think of me once in a while.
My $100 Mossberg 500 and my 500 in 410 have wood stocks.
 

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Here's a nice 4X Ajack made around 1942 and sitting on a 1918 Swedish m/41B. I used to shoot vintage sniper with it. There's an 8"X 8" steel plate 600 yards from the yellow line at the Henry County Gun Club in Paris Tennessee that knows my rifle pretty darn well.

1918 m41b ad.jpg


The round brass disk will tell you that the Swedish armorer that last inspected it thought the barrel was like new and measured out at 6.50, original barrel too. The 84 stamp was when the scope was last checked.

Here's a couple of m.o.a. busters from 1912 and 1908. The 08 on the bottom is the most accurate Mauser in the safe. It's scary.
1908 1912 FSR m96s (2).png


I'll throw this 1980 22-250 Remington 700 in there just so y'all know I have other rifles.

1980 Remington 700 22 250.png

Not a plastic rifle in the safe.
 

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After considering the posts, I guess it's like our vehicles. Management's new Toyota's getting 35 mpg, almost drives itself, and tells us how to find places. My 350 Superduty pulls the 5th wheel like nothing's behind me. But my 1949 Willys CJ2A just makes me happy.

My modern guns do a great job of what they're designed for and I've trusted my life to them for many years, but sitting in the woods with a flinter or my favorite original .36 percussion half-stock is just plain fun. To each his/her own. Enjoy the ride, it'll be over sooner than you think.
 

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There hasn't been improvement in the practical functionally of a bolt action rifle since the invention of the Mauser in 1898. The extra value of older rifles is that, many times, they have a history. For some folks that is no value at all. I just wonder if 125 years from now, someone will be lovingly cleaning and carefully storing, a plastic rifle. Who know, they may be.
Just to make it clear the Mauser Brothers first bolt action rifle was introduced in 1871. The 98, the basis of most of today's modern bolt action rifles, was introduced in 1898. What made the 98 different from previous models was it's third safety lug on the bolt body and larger receiver ring vastly increasing the overall strength of the action
 

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Well I dug out my Steyr PH and 700 that wears an HS Precision stock.
Man I like those rifles too :)

Think my #1 and 760 will suffice in my walnut/steel needs.

Took my boat paddle Ruger to a shop to put on consign.
Trying to decide if I should keep the Sako or not (use the $ to upgrade optics).
 
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Deer season has sucked and it's really got me wanting to get rid of "extra" deer rigs.
I don't see things improving locally, will have to start hunting out of state.
While I like rifles, and have had dozens over the years.......am not a collector, am a user.......and not being able to use em.........blows.
 

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Damn this is hard to admit ... I own a plastic rifle.
I am a wood and steel type all my life, always have been.
But my first rifle was a Remington .22 nylon rifle, That my brother got for me.
At the time (early 70's ) I wanted the Charter Arms take down rifle .
My brother knowing it was not a good thing for a 16 year old to have
a take down rifle, living in a small city showed wisdom.
Now it still amazes me that after all these years one of the most valuable .22's
in my collection is the nylon Remington.
 

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I purchased a plastic rifle. Because it was
Cheap, and the end goal was to get familiar with the ROUND not the firearm. I figured, cheap gun, but great results with a particular carriage equals, A better quality firearm in my future.. It was a Thomson Center compass in 6.5 creedmoor with a Leopold scope. Its services my learning experience..
 
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