Old cemetery on my parents land

Discussion in 'The Club House' started by steadyshot, Aug 27, 2013.

  1. steadyshot

    steadyshot New Member

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    There is an old cemetery on my parents property. It's a small cemetery that predates the civil war. I use to play around the headstones when I was a kid, never giving any thought to the people who were buried there.

    I walked on out there the other day and gave some thought to the people there. I thought about what their lives were like and what the area was like when they were alive.

    I live here in Illinois and one of the men buried here was born in 1817. One year before Illinois became a State (the 21st). Another man here witnessed the civil war and WWII during his life time.

    These people lived in a time when the USA was still a new Country. They witnessed times and events in US history that I can only read about in books.

    It's kind of funny how much more interested I am now compared to when I was a kid...

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    This years soy beans
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  2. clr8ter

    clr8ter New Member

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    That's real interesting. I wonder how your parents came to own a cemetery? Some of those markers don't look original, particularly the pink granite one....... Is it just the 3?
     

  3. winds-of-change

    winds-of-change The Balota's Staff Member

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    I love walking through old cemeteries. Around here, some of the farms have family cemeteries on their property that are quite old. They don't mind if you walk through them. My Mom and I used to walk through cemeteries quite often. We find them interesting. Like you, we wondered about the lives of those now in the ground.
     
  4. steadyshot

    steadyshot New Member

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    It was there when my parents bought the land back in the 70's. They own about 600 acres.

    I don't think the headstones have ever been moved. That would be illegal.

    Yes, there are just the three graves.
     
  5. steadyshot

    steadyshot New Member

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    That's what this is, a farm cemetery.
     
  6. trip286

    trip286 New Member

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    My step dad's grandmother was 101 or 103 when she passed. No one seems to know for sure. SHE said 101, so that's what I go with.

    On her 99th birthday, she wrote me a letter in Afghanistan. It was beautiful in its own way, written obviously by a very shaky hand, the only hand she had, but in a very classic cursive style.

    I still have it somewhere. I've often thought about the things she'd seen.

    And I decided that over 100 years is a long damn time to put up with this ****.
     
  7. Axxe55

    Axxe55 The Apocalypse Is Coming.....

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    are the three people buried there related to another?
     
  8. steadyshot

    steadyshot New Member

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    I don't know for sure, however I think they must be in some way.
     
  9. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    Folks in the country usually had a family burying ground. I walked thru ours whenever I walked between my grandparents homes- never really understood the aversion to cemeteries in the movies.

    I have taken the grandkids thru the church cemetery where my folks are buried- teaching them family history.

    And for those that wonder about the lives of people in those long ago times, I dare you to read this without a lump in your throat. It is in Williamsburg VA.

    williamsburg.jpg
     
    Last edited: Aug 29, 2013
  10. notdku

    notdku Administrator Staff Member

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    I'm glad I live in an age where that doesn't happen as much. What a nightmare.
     
  11. winds-of-change

    winds-of-change The Balota's Staff Member

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    As my Mom and I strolled through old cemeteries, we saw many headstones of a young woman in her early 20's with a baby buried next to her. We new exactly what happened. :(
     
  12. ellis36

    ellis36 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    This is one headstone in an old cemetery on my place…which is part of my grandfathers land. It’s completely unkept and most headstones have fallen over and covered in leaves. I probably am the only one left who remembers anything about it. I have an appointment this fall, after frost, with a local person who logs and keeps up with old cemeteries. We’re going to find as many stones as we can and record the information. The inscription on this stone says:

    Louisa
    wife of
    Albert
    Hamilton
    Died June 17, 1880.
    Age 49 yrs.
    Gone but not
    forgotten

    I remember the Hamilton's and the Duke’s, the families that my grandfather bought the land from. They originally purchased it from the U.S. Government. I have copies of their deeds that were signed by Franklin Pierce, James Buchanan, James Polk.
     

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  13. WebleyFosbery38

    WebleyFosbery38 New Member

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    Our graveyards are very old in upstate NY. Some go back to the 1700's but before that, their were family plots all over the damn place. You cant hardly dig a hole without hitting a grave around here, from Indian times to the middle 1800's, most folks didnt pay for a spot to bury their loved ones, they just found a spot on their property that wasnt prone to flooding and thats where family got buried.

    We have the Irish Settlement Graveyard up the road from us. 5+ generations from the 10 original founders are in that hill, from about 1790 to 1930, every one of them sporting a good Irish last name. None of them ostentatious, most of them were farmers. My man-cave/ Library was likely the last home most locals stopped in before they were buried, the room has an over sized coffin sized closet and a 38" door on it for a reason (All the rest in the house were 34" max except the outside entrance to the Parlor, another 38" door). The room is much more ornate than the rest of the house for good reason- It was the dead room for the settlement, I never told my wife that, she would have had a bird! They didnt have funeral parlors when our area was settled, Mr Philpot was one of the leaders in the settlement and pretty well off by most standards turn of the century, 1800 so my house was used for many community things including funerals.
     
  14. slugraduate

    slugraduate New Member

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    What part of Illinois are you from, may I ask?
     
  15. steadyshot

    steadyshot New Member

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    I live in south west Illinois. (Madison County)
     
  16. notdku

    notdku Administrator Staff Member

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    You see that a lot down here too. Especially in the smaller towns who had limited access to medical intervention.
     
  17. slugraduate

    slugraduate New Member

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    I had a suspicion about that. I grew up in O'fallon and my parents now live in Troy. Those old cemeteries are everywhere. There is one a couple of hundred yards from my parents home, off of Spring Valley road.
     
  18. steadyshot

    steadyshot New Member

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    My brother lives in Troy IL.:)
     
  19. Chainfire

    Chainfire Well-Known Member Supporter

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    After studying family history for about a year, I discovered a family cemetery that had many of the people I had been reading about. I had no idea that the cemetery existed until I was in my late 50s. The oldest died in 1799 (My 5th great grandfather) the last one buried there was in the 1980s. There were about 50 burials inside a stone wall, beside a mountain stream. There were two additional generations that were buried in the North, before my Scottish ancestors had the good grace to come to the Deep South.

    It was a very humbling experience to be alone with so many of my ancestors. I am neither superstitious or religious, but I felt the presence of my people and hoped that they would have approved of the man I was.
     
  20. TLuker

    TLuker New Member

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    Here's the old grave yard down the road from where I grew up.

    Cedar Springs.jpg

    The original Cedar Springs church was built in 1779. It was rebuilt around 1800 but then burned in the 1850's and was rebuilt again. Walking around here really gives you an appreciation for the past and all that these people overcame. The saddest part is all of the infants. There were a lot of women that died in childbirth along with the child, but there was also a good chance that the child just wasn't going to make it even if the birth went well. I've never counted the graves and so on but it's obvious that a very large percentage of the graves were infants less than 1 year old. Infant mortality was horrible then.

    There are many family cemeteries in the surrounding area. Some have tombstones and some just have a piece of quartz laid at the head of the grave. All say something about the past.


    All places have an interesting history but so many just aren't aware of it. The company I used to work for was located on Rock Church road. To get the younger people there interested in the history of our area I would tell them about a cemetery a few miles away. The cemetery is in a location that everyone in town is familiar with but almost no one knows about the cemetery. No one takes the time to notice it. One of the graves there is John Montegue. On his tombstone it states he was wounded by a sabre protecting George Washington in the War. He and all the others there were elders in Rock Church which was just a few hundred yards from where we worked. The road behind our plant is shown on an 1825 map of the area. None of the people there had any idea of the history of the area.
     
    Last edited: Aug 30, 2013