Oil and firearms

Discussion in 'Semi-Auto Handguns' started by Lupo, Sep 18, 2009.

  1. Lupo

    Lupo New Member

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    Well it may sound like a dumb question, but rather know than be ignorant.
    Is oil on your gun good? The more oil the better? and whats the deal with storing it, wouldnt the oil deteriorate the gun faster? and then whats the difference with oil rather than grease? I just don't comprehend sorry.

    Thank you.
     
  2. NGIB

    NGIB New Member

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    Oil & steel are actually a pretty good mix. Heck, you could drop a gun in a bucket of oil and it wouldn't hurt it a bit (grips aside). While not really necessary on a stainless gun (they will rust), a wipe down with an oily rag is very good for blued & parked guns...
     

  3. ArkansasHunter

    ArkansasHunter New Member

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    The first thing that comes to mind after reading your question is the wood stocks if your firearm is a long gun.
    The oil can and will soak into where the butt is connected to the reciever and in the area of the forearm under the barrel.
    Otherwise the quanity of oil will not hurt the gun BUT wipe it off and dry the inside of the barrel before you go to shoot it.

    When I was a kid folks around hear stored there guns with a coating of Vasilene.
    We did'nt put it on the stocks, just the metal...Did'nt hurt them at tall.

    A guns reciever needs to have a little oil to prevent wear and some gun manufactures such is Marlin is reccommending useing grease on a few places of some of there guns.

    To much oil will collect burnt powder and trash in the recievers so go easy after cleaning.

    I like useing Break Free w/CLP in the spray can and after useing I take a cloth and lay it on the floor next to a wall and leave the gun muzzle down on the towel a day or two to drain any excess oil.

    Others here may have there way also... Hope I helped...A.H
     
    Last edited: Sep 18, 2009
  4. Lupo

    Lupo New Member

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    Recommend an oil? Best bang for the buck kinda deal? So would I just kinda open up the breach of my ar-15 and just squirt it like crazy. What is the proper way to apply it. And what is the deal the with silicone?
     
  5. ArkansasHunter

    ArkansasHunter New Member

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    Go to WalMart and buy a cleaning kit and a can of BreakFree w/CPL. OIL .
    Follow the directions that come with the cleaning kit and if you have the manual to your AR-15 then you best be learning how to tear it down to clean.

    If you ever go to replace the grip on your AR-15 please contact me becuase I don't want you to have happen to you what happened to me LOL.

    And if you ever have a single point hitch put on it for a sling to attach to...if you are not sure have someone that knows how to do it, do it.

    You'd be amazed at the little parts that can fall out of an AR-15 and become lost or you don't know where they go, so learn your manual or buy you one and learn it and how to clean it please....A.H
     
  6. dnthmn2004

    dnthmn2004 New Member

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    I recommend using the amount of oil the manufacturer says to. (The manuals are good for something). My M&P only calls for 5 strategically placed drops of oil to keep it running smoothly. Anymore than that and it would collect too much residue.

    Silicone is usually for lubing metal to plastic contacts. Example: the POS Remington 710's rear bolt housing is lined with plastic. The only way the bolt is going to run smooth is with silicone lube. Oil will only make it stick like glue (thats why most people hate the 710).
     
  7. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    Most metal-to-metal contact is eased by lubrication. Depending on what yer doing, may be a very light oil, a heavier oil, or grease.

    Too much oil will damage WOOD over a period of time- and the linseed or tung oil used as a wood finish is NOT the same as a petroleum based lubricating oil.

    a 1911A1 has about 6 points that should get a DROP of oil, and a couple of points that should be lubed with a light grease. The AR-15 style rifle- just a few points, and the AR gets a lube that looks like Crisco that is just melting (military calls it LSA) When in doubt, read the instructions.

    Too much lube, it spatters, and makes dirt stick to the weapon. Too little, it may not cycle. When I was stationed in Alaska, we removed almost ALL lube from firearms for winter field duty (-65 air temps do funny things to oil)

    For some firearms, I use a couple of drops of Remoil, some I use CLP collector. A LIGHT coat of oil on a steel weapon helps prevent rust- a couple of drops on a cotton cloth, wipe, put away.

    One that I have a pet peeve with is WD-40. It is NOT a good lube (WD stands for Water Displacing) and tends to dry into a gummy headache.

    You wouldn't drive your car with no oil in the engine, nor would you pour 5 gallons into your car, nor grease the seats and steering wheel.
     
  8. WDB

    WDB New Member

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    Honestly if you own a AR 15 you should already know how to clean it. It's not an entry level firearm. If you own it and don't know how to clean it then that is a good thing.

    I can't offer any advice,

    where are the SM reading this thread fully?
     
    Last edited: Sep 21, 2009
  9. Gojubrian

    Gojubrian New Member

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    WD-40 and use sparingly. Pistols like oil, but not a whole lot. If you have iol seeping then you used too much. :)
     
  10. NGIB

    NGIB New Member

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    WD-40 as a lubricant? The WD stands for "water displacement" and this stuff is not designed to provide lubrication for moving parts. It may provide some protection for a gun externally, but IMHO WD-40 and guns don't mix...
     
  11. Gojubrian

    Gojubrian New Member

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    Never had a problem in over 20+ years. "YMMV" :)
     
  12. Bigguns911

    Bigguns911 New Member

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    I have been told by a Colt armorer that a good quality synthetic motor oil will do great on a Colt AR-M16. According to him it has a very high heat tolerance and will still work in cold weather. I suspect if it works on hi end motors then it would work on a gun. It also cost a lot less then gun oil. Just what I have been told.
     
  13. Stangman

    Stangman New Member

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    I have been told that wd-40 attracts dirt, so I wouldn't use it on any of my firearms. I have put too much oil and it shot out at me right on my shootin glasses when I fired! There is such a thing as too much.
     
  14. Hollander

    Hollander New Member

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    I have been using Mobil One synthetic ever since reading about it on one of the several forums I follow. It is terrific even with guns supposedly to be finicky. It holds up to a 200 round shoot in my EMP, works great in the PPS and Kahr PM9, and all the other guns I have. I do not think I will ever try something else.
     
  15. robocop10mm

    robocop10mm Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    WD-40 is NOT a good gun oil. It is fine if you get stuck in a rain storm with your rifle and need to protect it for a few hours until you can clean it properly.

    Learn to properly strip and clean the AR. Just "squirting some oil in it" is definately NOT proper maintenance. This would be akin to simply draining one half of your Corvette's oil, leaving the old filter in place and pouring a couple of
    quarts of oil under the hood hoping some would get into the engine.

    Most firearms will tell you where they want oil. Shiny spots and areas where bluing or parkerizing is worn off are areas of metal to metal contact/wear. A drop of oil on each of these parts is a pretty good start.

    Me? Castrol Syntec 5W30
     
  16. IGETEVEN

    IGETEVEN New Member

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    Glad to see I am not alone in my use of lubrication of my guns with synthetic motor oils. Amsoil synthetic 5w-30. Chit works! And various weights for use in my vehicles and cycles also.

    Jack
     
  17. gorknoids

    gorknoids New Member

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    WD-40 is a good cleaning agent due to it's solvent content. As a water-displacant, it is lighter than water, so simple science blows that theory out of the water. It's main selling point is that it's a good-smelling petroleum product in a handy-dandy spray can. Quite frankly, it isn't worth a damn for any of the uses it claims to address. Let me re-phrase that: It is remarkably inferior to many other products available to the public, particularly in view of it's market share in the lubricants market. After 10 years of civilian life, I've been through dozens of cases of it, and it sucks. Silicone sprays actually leave a lubricant residue that rivals Teflon, which we used to use in the lubricators on the M61A1, but lost due to some perceived threat from outgassing during high temperature exposure. Motor oil on weapons parts is a great idea. The testing that goes into every quart of motor oil would make Morton-Thiokol look like a Mexican firecracker factory.
    Keep all lubricants off wooden stocks, forestocks, and grips. Wood can't shed oil like it can water, and eventually the wood will swell and possibly split. My Dad used to oil the head end of his axe handles because they would never dry out and shrink, making sure that the heads stayed securely in place.
     
  18. BILLYBOB44

    BILLYBOB44 New Member

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    WD-40 is good??

    WD-40 is good for a shooter that cleans their guns often. Mostly wipe on+wipe off. After wipe off place BreakFree CLP or RemOil on friction points and apply a light coat of car wax to the exterior blued surfaces. An old gunsmith-that was well worth his salt-told me years ago to NOT use WD-40 on any gun parts, and then let them sit up. The residue of the moisture displacement will gum up, and turn into a varnish, that is very difficult to remove. I received that advise from a man that has forgot more about gun maintenance/repairs than I will ever know.;):)
     
  19. Gojubrian

    Gojubrian New Member

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    That's what I do. Wipe the wd-40 off, then add your desired oil.
     
  20. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    Well, I started using the synthetic motor oils as gun lube- but now I get these post cards from Jiffy Lube, reminding me to bring my Remington 1100 in for service...... :p