Oh....my....God....

Discussion in 'The Club House' started by DuckA, Dec 7, 2008.

  1. DuckA

    DuckA New Member

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    Did anyone see this?

    http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,463172,00.html

    Since when is Compton a working-class neighborhood?

    Apparently working on collecting hand grenades.

    I'm assuming these grenades were not legally licensed. I'm also assuming that the people that can afford to legally own hand grenades can also afford Christmas presents. How many "family people" own illegal hand grenades? Not saying there's really anything wrong with that. I'd love to have one or two.

    Couldn't they also do that with a car? Or hand grenades?
     
    Last edited: Dec 7, 2008
  2. Benning Boy

    Benning Boy New Member

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    "Honey, have you seen my grenades?"
     

  3. Dillinger

    Dillinger New Member

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    I sure would like to see ballistic reports done on those turned in weapons to find out how many were involved in "Random Acts" of gun violence.

    Now the question begs to asked, what are the police going to do with the guns? Sell them out the back door like that Sheriff's office down in Florida did? :rolleyes:

    JD
     
  4. Benning Boy

    Benning Boy New Member

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    Help from the more knowledgable, and I'm not suggesting any illeagal actions, just trying to wrap my head around this.

    1) Since grenades, to the best of my knowledge, are illeagal pretty much everywhere in the U.S. regardless of license status, I'm assuming the only way to turn these in is if there is a no questions asked policy, correct?

    2) Since the only grenades I'm aware of in the U.S. are federal property, I am assuming these were stolen. That means stolen property is accepted at these turn ins, correct?

    3) If my legally owned firearm is stolen, and turned in, is there a mechanism in place to return it to me?

    4) Wouldn't I do better with my "Soviet era carbine" at a gun shop or pawn shop, unless there was a reason that I couldn't take it to a licensed dealer?

    5) If a gun is used in a shooting, turned in at one of these things, can it be used as evidence later, or did we just legally screw ourselves by accepting the crime gun and handing out a gift certificate for it?
     
  5. Dillinger

    Dillinger New Member

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    Well, I don't know the details of this particular gun trade in program, but the ones that I am familiar with are no questions asked. So yes, it's a way to dispose of evidence of a crime, and since they would have to run ballistics on EVERY gun and compare it to a known case, linking the weapon to a crime is still only half the problem. You would have to know, for example, that the shooter used an AK - then test any AK's turned in against that known case.

    Assuming you had a match, all you would have then is the gun in question. I suppose you could disassemble the weapon and look for finger prints - but good luck and who is going to pay for all that time spent testing? 590 guns is a lot to strip and finger print.

    I believe a few months back there was one where a guy turned in a rocket launcher that was "in his shed" or something like that. I remember there was a discussion about it on here...link to the story

    These type of "Get guns off the streets" deals are a feel good program in my opinion. I don't believe anyone with bad intentions is disarming themselves for a gift certificate.
     
  6. robocop10mm

    robocop10mm Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    Compton, working class neighborhood? Working at selling drugs or other worthy felonious endeavors.

    The vast majority of the guns obtained at these events are stolen, used in a crime, or just junk. Turn in a rust bucket inoperable RG revolver and get a gift certificate. Whata deal!

    Generally if a stolen gun is recovered in these feel good rallys, they are destroyed and the rightful owner never notified of the recovery.
     
  7. bkt

    bkt New Member

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    Most of these sorts of things have no-questions-asked policies and they don't take names or addresses.

    Almost all of the things turned in are worthless, non-functioning crap. The few that do work are probably turned in out of ignorance on the part of the owner, who is unaware that he or she could get a lot more for it at a gun store.

    We have these buy-backs all the time. Turn in a gun, get a $50 gift card to a local grocery store. The stuff the cops collect are most certainly NOT used in crimes. Around here, at least, whatever is collected is supposedly destroyed.
     
  8. DuckA

    DuckA New Member

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    Grenades are covered under the same laws that govern full auto weapons. Civilians can own them, but it's up to the discretion of the sheriff whether or not he wants to sign off on it. The potential buyer still has to pay the fee and get a stamp for each grenade.

    To answer another of your questions; the grenades were probably stolen from an armory somewhere.
     
    Last edited: Dec 8, 2008
  9. CA357

    CA357 New Member Supporter

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    I'd rather have some C4 and a few Claymores anyway. ;)
     
  10. Missouri_1

    Missouri_1 New Member

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    It's obvious that it doesn't work......

    ST. LOUIS -- A cash-for-guns program that erupted into unexpected controversy at a St. Louis Board of Police Commissioners meeting last month was approved today by a 4-1 vote.

    The board approved the buyback by a 4-1 vote. The only vote against it came from Board President Chris Goodson, who spoke against the buy-back at a meeting on Nov. 19. He said then a rising murder rate suggested the program was not working. The department was expected to allocate $57,500 in seized drug money for payments of $50 to people who turned in handguns or shotguns, and $100 for assault-type guns.
     
  11. dragunovsks

    dragunovsks New Member

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    Yes, Benning Boy, it is anonymous. I heard about it on "The Bob and Tom Show" this morning. I've been hungry before but not hungry enough to trade in my guns. Of course where I live, if you get hungry, then you go out and kill something to eat.
     
  12. DuckA

    DuckA New Member

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    If they had one of these in my area, I'd go hang out in front and try to intercept those with half-decent guns. I don't think they'd care who got the gun as long as they got the money. Then again, the cops would probably post somebody just beyond me waiting to catch me with stolen property. :rolleyes:
     
  13. cpttango30

    cpttango30 New Member

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    I want to go to one and set up a table with about $20,000 in cash in my pocket and my blue book on the table and stop anyone before they get to the police and offer them double what the cop are giving or fair market value.

    That would be a way to get some good cheap guns yes? Think about it then you check them all and say if you buy 200 guns for $100 thats $20,000 Ok so 5 come back as stolen or what ever and you turn them over to the police and collect your $50 card so now you really only out $250 for It is a loss yes but still you can get some good guns I bet. I have heard of guys doing this. in states where it is still ok to buy and sell between friends ftf.

    That would put a rock in the cops craw wouldn't?
     
  14. DuckA

    DuckA New Member

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    I'd just like to have $20,000 in my pocket.