Offhand supporting arm position.

Discussion in '.22 Rifle/Rimfire Discussion' started by Vincine, Feb 19, 2012.

  1. Vincine

    Vincine New Member

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    I’m new to this. I’m investigating a .22lr trainer purchase. I shouldered a few .22s yesterday (no sling). If I brace my support elbow against my body, my hand falls right where the magazine is. If I move my hand forward the magazine, my elbow is hanging out in air and I lose the support of my body. What am I doing wrong? Or is that the nature of the beast?
     
  2. mrm14

    mrm14 Active Member

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    Try using a sling with a cuff that straps around your biceps. This will give you good triangulated support in the off hand as well as sitting, kneeling, and prone unsupported positions.
     

  3. vincent

    vincent New Member

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    I'm sure a lot of more experienced shooters will have a much better answer for you than me...but here's my .02...I've always thought rifle shooting offhanded, unless absolutely neccesary is a waste of ammo. A sling might help to stabilize things by wrapping it once around your wrist/forearm. If you were to hunt, for example, you can use a tree or a rock, or shoot from the prone position to gain stability, a bipod is great for prone shooting. At the range, there is usually some kind of tabletop to use. Shot my 10/22 yesterday and nary a shot did I take without some kind of support. I know it's just cheapo .22 ammo but I think it's a good habit to get into first.
     
  4. Vincine

    Vincine New Member

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    Yes, shooting supported or with a sling is certainly much easier and produces better results. I still would like to be able to shoot offhand. I’m just not comfortable doing it without my supporting bicep braced against my body. I’d like to know how people with magazine fed rifles do it.
     
  5. montveil

    montveil New Member

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    Here are a few sites that explain the proper use of a sling.
    A hasty sling will be of great help offhand.

    [ame]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KRPfj-6bRZM&feature=related[/ame]
    [ame]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1gAso3l7UCU&NR=1[/ame]
    http://www.rifleshootermag.com/shooting_tips/sling_0612/
     
  6. cbibb

    cbibb New Member

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    In about all positions of shooting you use a sling in off hand it is not necessary cause it really does no good cause you move around at the waist and shoulder etc if it helped they would allow it at competition shoots and military doesn't train off hand with slings now you need to use your skeletal structure to support you not muscle if you use your muscles you will not be able to hold still and you always have arc of movement need to minimize it and time it for your shot that takes practice and allot of it there are books and videos to help Dave Tubbs has a good book out or may find something on you tube good luck and practice
     
  7. TLuker

    TLuker New Member

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    The sling helps, but like cbibb said you want to build a good position using skeletal structure first. It sounds like that's what you were doing but the magazine was in the way. In the standing position you want to shift your upper body away from the target. That lets you plant your elbow firmly on your left hip with your forearm perpendicularity to the ground. Shifting back a little further with your upper body should slide the gun further back and slide the magazine further back for clearance. But it will feel awkward, or at least it always did to me. :)
     
  8. Vikingdad

    Vikingdad New Member

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    ^^^This^^^

    It will feel awkward at first but with practice it will become natural.

    Another thing is when I am hunting rabbits I shoot before I have a chance to get wiggly. The longer you take to acquire the target the more you get the shakes. I think shooting skeet helps to learn this? Never thought about it until now.
     
  9. Vincine

    Vincine New Member

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    So, I’ve been looking at photos and diagrams and videos of standing shooters, biathlon and others, and I couldn’t find any close ups of the supporting hand position. What I do see are rifles with forestocks thick enough to bury the magazine, or rifles with support handles descending from the forestock. I did see a poor diagram depicting a figure supporting the rifle’s forestock way forward and bending way ‘backward’ at the waist in order to get the support elbow on the ribcage/hip like 'TLuker' & 'Vikingdad' suggest. That just doesn’t seem stable or repeatable to me.

    I also saw one diagram that displays making a 'bridge' under the magazine with one’s fingers on the forestock and the thumb on the trigger guard. It got me thinking; I’ll see if I can fit just the web between my thumb & index in to the space between the trigger guard and the magazine. I don't remember if I've already tried that at the store. I've been trying to rest the forestock in the palm of my hand without success.

    I have been favoring the Savage Mark IIs because of the out of the box accuracy, but maybe rotary magazine Ruger 10/22 is required?
     
    Last edited: Feb 21, 2012
  10. montveil

    montveil New Member

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    One has to consider ones body dimensions as we are not all the same. You may have to try different positions and find the one best for you.
     
  11. Vikingdad

    Vikingdad New Member

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    I bet the ideal shooter's body dimensions would look something like a neanderthal. Long arms and a short torso. That does not describe me though so I improvise by doing the leaning back thing, making a firm skeletal triangular frame. I was taught how to do it by a competitive shooter, which might be what it takes to learn. It is very unnatural but at the same time effective.
     
  12. TLuker

    TLuker New Member

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    I learned the same position on the rifle team in high school. The neanderthal body doesn't help much (that is my body type), at least with standing. My upper body and chest has always been much larger than my lower body and hips. As a result, my elbow cannot physically reach my hip (my upper body is just too wide). On the plus side tough, I still had great skeletal support despite my elbow not resting on my hip. The left side of my chest still completely supports my left arm.

    Vinvine, here is a link that covers the basics. Notice the hand in the photo is almost directly under the action (were the clips is). If that paerson leaned back a little more and didn't have a 1" recoil pad his hand might clear the clip? Wide hips also help. Our best shooter in the standing position was a girl, and she had really nice "hips".:D http://weihrauchowners.freeforums.org/download/file.php?id=7
     
  13. Vincine

    Vincine New Member

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    Thanks for the link. It is better than the others I found. I can’t help noticing that in the close-ups of the supporting hand position (pg. 21, illus. 1-5) the rifle does not have a magazine. The only position that would work if it did was figure 5, but then it wouldn’t be an air rifle.
     
  14. TLuker

    TLuker New Member

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    I'm guessing that the majority of pure target rifles are single shot? Having a clip wouldn't prevent it from being a good target rifle though.