Obsolete Ammo? Help

Discussion in 'Ammunition & Reloading' started by Hathead9, Jan 23, 2011.

  1. Hathead9

    Hathead9 New Member

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    A few years back I was walking around a gun show and saw two, five gallon buckets filled with loose ammo under a dealer's table. I asked him if it was for sale and he said it was. I ended up buying them and taking them home. Once I reached my house I began the immense task of organizing all the ammo. I started to realize that ther were quite a few different types that I had never seen before. This is one of them...
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    It is some sort of rimfire cartridge. There is a "U" headstamp on the back, im guessing for UMC / Remington. I was thinking possibly .30 rimfire short? Is this ammo worth anything?
     
  2. powg

    powg New Member

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    olde ammo

    go to old western scrounger.com ...see if what you have will cross reference...could be .41 rimfire .
     

  3. cpttango30

    cpttango30 New Member

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    How would 41 rimfire mike out to .299 on the bullet?

    you need cartridges of the world.
     
  4. JonM

    JonM Moderator

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    most rimfire is not collectable prolly why it was in a bucket. but ya never know. most collectable where those with special commerative headstamps.

    the Marlin Model 1872 was one gun that shot it. its a .30 Rimfire. the large rimfires fell out of favour due to un-reliable ignition of the powder chardge from the under powered rim priming system.

    [​IMG]

    list of rimfire cartridges prolly not all of them

    2.34 mm (The smallest rimfire cartridge, produced for the Swiss Mini Gun)
    4 mm
    .14 Alton Jones
    .17 Mach 2
    .17 Hornady Magnum
    5 mm Remington Rimfire Magnum
    .22 Short
    .22 Long
    .22 Extra Long
    .22 Long Rifle
    .22 WMR
    .22WRF
    .22 ILARCO
    .22 CB
    .22 CB cap
    .22 BB
    .22 Remington Automatic
    .22 Winchester Automatic
    6 mm
    .25 Stevens
    .25 Stevens Short
    .267 Remington
    .30 rimfire
    .30 R Blaser
    .310 Remington Skeet
    .31 Eley
    .32 Rimfire cartridge
    .340 rimfire revolver
    .35 Allen
    9 mm Rimfire Shotgun Shell
    .38 Short, Long, & Extra Long
    .41 Rimfire
    .41 Swiss
    .42 Allen
    .44 Short & Long
    .440
    .442 Eley
    .44 Henry
    .45 Danish
    .46 Extra Short, Short, Long, & Extra Long
    .50 Remington Navy
    .50 Government
    .56-46, 56-50, 56-52 Spencer
    .58 Gatling
    .58 Joslyn carbine
    .58 Mont Storm
    .58 Miller
     
    Last edited: Jan 23, 2011
  5. Hathead9

    Hathead9 New Member

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    From all of the sites I looked at none of them showed pictures of a .30 rimfire this short. Could it be like a .30 Rimfire Ultra Short or something? I saw that derringers were popular at the time that this ammo was produced. Could this ammo have been made for derringer use to reduce recoil?
     
  6. Benning Boy

    Benning Boy New Member

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    As to it's value.....
     

    Attached Files:

  7. Hathead9

    Hathead9 New Member

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    Strange

    Its strange thet the bullets read .299 but the case is almost identical to a .32 Extra Short Rimfire. I hear those rounds are quite desireable. Any clarification?
     
  8. JonM

    JonM Moderator

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    it just depends collector world condition is everything.

    get yourself a ammo collector book.

    all i got for ya is basic info that is easily found on google.
     
  9. kenl

    kenl New Member

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    According to "Cartridges of the World" the .30 short is 0.822" long, with a bullet dia. of 0.286" and a rim dia. of 0.346". Case length is 0.515 (30 long cl is 0.613"). Measurements are a bit off, but it's possible, considering the quality control of the era.

    Worth? Sorry, can't help you there. Usually the rounds are worth more in the box than alone, bit you might be able to find someone who wants to fill an incomplete box.

    Good luck
     
  10. JeffP

    JeffP New Member

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    Quick question. I just bought a Spencer Civil War cartridge as a gift. Might be a dumb question but is it still live? Does the black powder degrade after so many years?
     
  11. hiwall

    hiwall Well-Known Member

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    JeffP the powder inside is likely live but the the primer is VERY likely dead.
     
  12. 303tom

    303tom Well-Known Member

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    It should be considered LIVE PERIOD !..............

    The priming compound will NOT be dead, in fact it could become more shock sensitive !.............

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Potassium_chlorate
     
  13. hiwall

    hiwall Well-Known Member

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    I personally have tried to shoot many, many pre-1900 rimfires. Almost every single one had bad priming. I have since given up.
     
  14. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    Rule 1. Ammo is live until it has been demilled
    Rule 2. When in doubt, see Rule 1.



    Now, having said that, the powder does not break down unless contaminated by water/oil, but the primer is likely dead. From that era, primers were usually not chlorate, but fulminate of mercury. The mercury base reacted with the copper in the cartridge brass.

    Unless you strike the primer, or heat it, should not pose any greater hazard than any other small arms ammo. I have a few rounds of Spencer, Henry etc from that time frame. Have a couple of rounds of inside primed 45-70, .43 Spanish, etc.
     
  15. nitestalker

    nitestalker New Member

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    That is a .32 Colt Short rimfire.299 healed bullet. The Marlin 92 lever action fired the .32 Colt Long CF or the .32 Colt Short rimfire. The firing pin was turned up for CF and down for rimfire. This was a popular rifle back in the day. This ammo as a collectors grade in original 50 round UMC boxes sell for around $35 dollars.:)
     
  16. 303tom

    303tom Well-Known Member

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    Sorry c3 but fulminate of mercury went out & potassium chlorate came in around the 1830`s, most if not all of your Rimfires came into existence in the late 1850`s early 1860`s...............
     
  17. hiwall

    hiwall Well-Known Member

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    There was only one 32 rimfire (though several lengths). I had a Marlin and shot both rim and center fires in it but I mostly shot centerfires due to the cost of rim fire ammo. the Marlin shot 32 Colt long centerfire shells. the shorts wouldn't feed in mine. 32 rim fire ammo here in the USA goes for $75 to over $100 per box.
     
  18. nitestalker

    nitestalker New Member

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    Check prices on Gun Broker. The .32 Colt Short rim fire is not that valuable. Problem is the priming compound as noted is mostly deteriorated.:(
     
  19. hiwall

    hiwall Well-Known Member

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