Now that's a dirty extractor.

Discussion in 'Semi-Auto Handguns' started by KG7IL, Mar 22, 2012.

  1. KG7IL

    KG7IL Active Member

    3,150
    23
    38
    Finally pulled out the Sterling 302, and tried to figure out why it was FTE on most every round. A careful look revealed that the extractor hook was barely gripping the case rim.

    Now, this little critter has some small parts and was always reluctant to remove the external extractor. It has the pivot pin with a spring on the back end.

    Using some low viscosity lube/penatrating fluid I was able to work the extractor as I flushed the recesses. After about ten minutes and a couple of dirty rags, things started looking better. I was starting to see full motion of the extractor and a proper grip by the extractor.

    The little critter is back to shooting everyshot and ejecting properly.
    I should have done this several years ago. I feel bad for overlooking this.

    22 LR are notoriously dirty and it seems my cleaning just packed in the crud.
    Looks like I can avoid removing the extractor, if i just spend a little more time in the cleaning process.
     
  2. fstkmaro

    fstkmaro New Member

    47
    0
    0
    happy it worked out for you
     

  3. Misfire

    Misfire New Member

    74
    0
    0
    Extractors are frequently ignored when it comes to cleaning. And they are one of the most important parts to the proper operation of any gun.
     
  4. SleazyRider

    SleazyRider New Member

    21
    0
    0
    I too have a Sterling 302, and I simply love that little pistol! My extractor has been acting up as of late, and upon very close examination, I found that the rim of my CCI .22LR ammo is a little rounder than the rim of my Federals. The Federal .22LR ammo seems to have a more pronounced rim, and the Sterling extractor grabs it easily and ejects it reliably. I think I'll remove the extractor and touch it up a bit with a stone.
     
  5. KG7IL

    KG7IL Active Member

    3,150
    23
    38
    Yup! Great Little Guns.

    I will share this link. I have purchased a part or two from him.
    http://www.gun-parts.com/sterling/
     
  6. SleazyRider

    SleazyRider New Member

    21
    0
    0
    On extractors ...

    Thanks for the link. I removed my extractor yesterday and touched up the hook with a 60-degree stone. The slot was full of crud just like you stated, and the spring was pretty gummed up as well. I removed a few machining burrs from the front corner of extractor slot with a small file, and lapped the top and bottom face of the extractor. The only difficulty I encountered was driving the 1/16-inch roll pin back in squarely with my clumsy hands, so I bent it a bit. Fortunately I had a bunch of new ones laying around, so I chucked one in a small 3-jaw chuck, spun it, and filed a very slight lead on one end to guide it into the hole. Worked like a charm, and cycled both Remington, Winchester, and CCI ammo.


    Do you know if the parts from gun-parts.com site are new old-stock or are they used?
     
    Last edited: Mar 25, 2013
  7. RustyShackleford101

    RustyShackleford101 New Member

    796
    0
    0
    A few years back I fired about 7,000 rounds through my 10/22 without cleaning. It was an experiment that I did. That thing was filthy! I had to clean that gun for a long time to get it 100% clean.
     
  8. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

    21,345
    224
    63
    MOST (not all) parts from Numrich (gunpartscorp.com) are used parts from organ donor guns. Some are old new stock.
     
  9. robocop10mm

    robocop10mm Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

    11,380
    1
    0
    I have found that 90% of al problems with .22's are fixed with a good deep cleaning.
     
  10. SleazyRider

    SleazyRider New Member

    21
    0
    0
    If I'm not mistaken, I believe that's a different company altogether. The link provided by KG7IL takes you to Bob's Gun Parts. But I suspect you're right about these parts, too, being used.
     
  11. SleazyRider

    SleazyRider New Member

    21
    0
    0
    Truer words were never spoken. The Sterling 302, however, falls into the 10% that won't always improve. The little gun evolved as a series of design flaws were noticed and "corrected" by the factory. One of them was the dimensions of the ejector port, which I've opened up on one of my 302s using the vertical mill, to allow the pistol to eject easier. Another problem was that the gun could discharge when dropped, which they addressed by installing a very heavy trigger spring and increasing the sear angle to the point of being ridiculous. NEVER CARRY THE 302 WITH ONE IN THE CHAMBER. Thanks to this heavy spring and sear combination, the blowback is oftentimes not powerful enough to completely cycle the action, and the sear does not "latch" with the firing pin. The sear needs careful stoning and the springs need changing, in my opinion.

    If you're willing to address some of these issues, you'll wind up with a marvelous little pistol at a bargain-basement price. If you try hard enough, it seems that you can make a silk purse out of a sow's ear.
     
  12. hmh

    hmh New Member

    962
    0
    0
    I want to know what happened with the experiment.
     
  13. RustyShackleford101

    RustyShackleford101 New Member

    796
    0
    0
    Well, the gun had a lot of troubles ejecting brass , because of so much gunk in the thing. The gun was mainly stove piping and just weakly ejecting. Also the bolt was very grimy and gritty, so that probably didn't help with extraction or ejection. When I took the gun apart, there was a pretty tangible, thick, crusty layer of carbon and crap lining the whole insides of the lower reciever/trigger group and the upper. Also the bolt was kind of blackened. I did notice a pretty thick and solid build up of residue right at the breech area, that required a lot of ballistol and a wire brush to remove. As might be expected, accuracy started to go down the drain, but the gun still shot reasonably. The biggest problems were pretty much just extraction/ejection and a very gritty bolt movement, not to mention the smell. I guess the moral of the story is, "a clean gun is a happy gun". It took quite a bit of labour to clean that thing.
     
  14. KG7IL

    KG7IL Active Member

    3,150
    23
    38
    Aren't they nice when freshly cleaned and lubed. :)

    As far as I know, and the ones that I received..... New Old-Stock.