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Titegroup isn't a powder that I'd ever suggest a newbie to use. It's too easy to over charge a case with it, and if you do, it's a good way to blow a gun apart as well as get severely injured.

I use a lot of it, but I've been reloading for over 40 years, and I'm very careful weighing each charge when loading it.
Good advice. It doesn't take much of it.
 

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Only a suggestion - you might want to start by reloading round-nose, full metal jacket bullets the first go-around. Not only for practice (target) shooting but also to get the "feel" of reloading that small caliber round. Don't know where you shoot, but finding those little devils (empty cases) in the grass and/or gravel frustrates me. Have Fun!
 

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Southernguns,
A NATIONAL field trial competitor! WOW! That DOES take a lot of time and talent to train. I trained my second one for AKC Hunt Tests, so I know the kind of work that takes, but a field trial dog of National level competence is really something else!
It is heartbreaking when they pass... and they can never be replaced. But, the void they leave in your life can be filled by another... given enough time. I never want to be without a Lab again, as long as I live. But being in my seventies, I think the next one, if I am unfortunate enough to have the need, will be from a Lab rescue, or similar source.
My wife, myself, and a friend trained 6 and 7 days a week except in the summer when it was too hot for the dog. We traveled all over creation in the season and he loved it. He knew when it was time to go. The advantage we had was we had a dozen different ponds, pastures, and places to move around in while training. They memorize all the places so we moved around to keep him sharp. He was bred well but we just watched his competition, could tell what they did wrong and just did it our way. The whole deal was some of the most fun we ever had. He beat some "power houses" but he was aggressive and we just out trained them with time, repetition, and new places to train on. Nobody could replicate that. Anyway, the whole thing was a blast until we had to quit. The wife got pregnant and our priorities changed.

Like Txhillbilly said, be careful and that applies all the time. Don't do it while doing anything else like watching TV. When I loaded for accuracy in rifle use, I weighed each charge and didn't use the powder measure. I don't know if it helped but I had some accurate loads. I'm just now getting back into it so his advice applies to me as well. Check the amount of powder Titegroup doesn't require and that's why he posted that. 380 takes VERY little powder. Same with 9mm. Start out with just a very few rounds just for testing then adjust. Start light!
 

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Southernguns,
A NATIONAL field trial competitor! WOW! That DOES take a lot of time and talent to train. I trained my second one for AKC Hunt Tests, so I know the kind of work that takes, but a field trial dog of National level competence is really something else!
It is heartbreaking when they pass... and they can never be replaced. But, the void they leave in your life can be filled by another... given enough time. I never want to be without a Lab again, as long as I live. But being in my seventies, I think the next one, if I am unfortunate enough to have the need, will be from a Lab rescue, or similar source.
Yes, I'm well into my 70's also. I lost my best friend ever Yellow Lab last April. IF, I would get another, I would do as you
and pick a Lab older and needed a good home.
 

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Yes, I'm well into my 70's also. I lost my best friend ever Yellow Lab last April. IF, I would get another, I would do as you
and pick a Lab older and needed a good home.
Good for you. They can make you very happy. Putting mine down was not something I could never do again. It still bothers me. I'm very sentimental and emotional about some things. Just the way I'm made.
 

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As a relatively old-timer, chronologically, I am a newbie to reloading. I've read a couple books on the subject, namely: Lyman 4th Reloading Handbook; Lyman Shotshell Reloading Handbook; Richard Lee's Modern Reloading, 2nd Edition, and I have also purchased, and lightly used, some basic equipment.

Having talked my wife into jumping through all the hoops and paying all the fees the State of MD has put in place to discourage the exercise our 2A right to purchase/use a gun. and to regularly go to the range with me, I am ready to seriously get into reloading.

I think this website looks to be a good place to learn from the "experienced reloader".
Welcome aboard from AZ!
Lots of handloaders here. Folks can be a little cautious when it comes to sharing specific loads. They are worried about the perceived liability.
Best advice is to stick to published loads in manuals. All the manuals will give you each piece of info for each cartridge. Case, primer, powder, and bullet, overall length, etc. Follow that. Pay attention to the test barrel length used for their velocity numbers. Generally, this will explain why your numbers are somewhat different.
Titgroup is a great powder, i use for multiple pistol cartridges. You get a LOT of bang for the buck with it. Tx is right though, it's pretty fast and a little bit goes a long ways. Double charges are a real concern. Even a few flakes of it accidentally mixed with other charges can KABOOM a gun.
My tip for the day is this: make sure you have only 1 powder on your bench at a time. If you need to switch to another load, another powder, ensure that the 1st powder is completely cleaned off the bench, and out of all equipment, then put away completely before you introduce another powder to the bench.
Good luck! Check out the handloading section here:

Ask questions. Most here are more than happy to help if they can.
PS: don't be afraid to start new threads. Just title them well, and you'll be able to easily reference them.
 

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Welcome aboard from AZ!
Lots of handloaders here. Folks can be a little cautious when it comes to sharing specific loads. They are worried about the perceived liability.
Best advice is to stick to published loads in manuals. All the manuals will give you each piece of info for each cartridge. Case, primer, powder, and bullet, overall length, etc. Follow that. Pay attention to the test barrel length used for their velocity numbers. Generally, this will explain why your numbers are somewhat different.
Titgroup is a great powder, i use for multiple pistol cartridges. You get a LOT of bang for the buck with it. Tx is right though, it's pretty fast and a little bit goes a long ways. Double charges are a real concern. Even a few flakes of it accidentally mixed with other charges can KABOOM a gun.
My tip for the day is this: make sure you have only 1 powder on your bench at a time. If you need to switch to another load, another powder, ensure that the 1st powder is completely cleaned off the bench, and out of all equipment, then put away completely before you introduce another powder to the bench.
Good luck! Check out the handloading section here:

Ask questions. Most here are more than happy to help if they can.
PS: don't be afraid to start new threads. Just title them well, and you'll be able to easily reference them.
Ditto. Super well articulated advice from Cliff here. Hand loading is fun but you're dealing with a propellant that burns pretty darned fast (not an explosive). It can burn and propel when confined, as in a bullet case with a seated bullet in the case. Simple but not so simple. Take your time and don't get in a hurry. Ask questions.
 

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Chocolate,
IMO the cases for a pistol are mostly the same. I have Winchester and Hornady Cases.
For my rifles I have Lapua and Hornady. Normal reloading for rifles as long a s the cases are of the same manufacture one is good to go. Back in the day when I was Bench Rest Comp. shooting, I was a fanatic and always have been when it comes to accuracy and especially rifle.
I check the capacity of the Comp. 5 rounds and kept those 5 rounds together when loading them until I couldn't load them safely anymore. And kept the rest I used in 5 round groups.
Since I have also a story to tell I will move it to a new Thread called Labradors and Beloved Pets.
 

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I've been reloading since 1968, in UK, Germany, USA and Canada. I remember being called out on one occasion by a gentleman in Fla. about one of the particular loads I mentioned [it had come straight out of the Speer manual], and advised that 'those figures are only for people reloading in the US of A, you furriners need to check out your own book seeing as how you do things different'.

Well, the only thing I do different these days is that I don't reload five pistol calibres apart from .38Spec/.357 Magnum. But I DO reload around fourteen rifle loads.

And welcome, from East Anglia UK.
 

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Hey, welcome Chocolatedogman!

You've definitely come to a great place. I'm relatively new on these forums, only been here about a year, but I have been on lots of forums over the years and I don't think I've been on a better one than this one here.

The wife and I love labs too, but we've decided we aren't going to get another dog until we fully retire. We just aren't home enough or have the time to properly care for one, so 3 cats are it for now.

As for loading your 380, there are a number of powders suitable for it, and all them require very little powder, so any of them could be very easily over charged. Titegroup (not Titewad) is a good powder, I load 9mm and 380 with it (and practically every available bullet weight for the 380 has a Titegroup recipe).

I think the guys were getting a little confused over the powder name because in one of your posts above you did interchange Titegroup and Titewad. Titewad is a shotgun powder (although 380 loads using 100 grain bullets do have some shotgun powders that will work).

Although I have a few reloading books, I still find myself jumping on Hodgdon's online reloading center (Hodgdon Landing | Hodgdon) as my powder stash consists mostly of Hodgdon powders and it's easy and convenient.

Anyway, I don't think you'll go wrong with Titegroup. It isn't the velocity king in the list (not that the spread is that much across all the powders), but it is a consistent performer...and usable in nearly every pistol round you can think of from 25 ACP all the way up to the big boy S&W 500 magnum.
 

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Welcome to the forum from Louisiana !
I started reloading and casting bullets in 1967 , shooting and reloading have been my hobbies all these years and I look forward to helping others . I learned a lot "the Hard Way" so if I can help you I look forward to doing so .
No interweb or forums when I started , you learned how to reload by reloading . I read the Lyman Cast Bullet Manuals , and Elmer Keith and Skeeter Skelton books and writings ...
Glad to have you on board ... it will be fun !
Gary
 

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Welcome from west Texas!
I have been reloading since I was 20 yrs old and in the Air Force. Retired from USAF more than 20 years ago…been reloading a while I guess. I tend to agree with TxHillbilly regarding the use of Tightgroup for the beginner. It is relatively fast burning which makes an overcharge, even a little, more dangerous. And the case will easily hold a double charge without overflow. I would recommend a slower powder that uses more grains per charge to start with until you are used to the process. And a 90 grain round nose would be a good bullet to learn the process with. You don’t need to load maximum loads, in fact I would avoid them and stay middle of the road as far as powder charges…this will make it easier on your wife to shoot also. I do not have my load data in front of me right now, but I will take a look later at some good powders for .380 that are a bit safer to load because they fill the case a bit more. Okay, I looked; I would suggest trying Hodgdon Universal, HS-6, or CFE Pistol. Also AA#5 is a good powder. All of these will use a little more powder but give a little more flexibility of range and not so fast burning as to be a potential danger until you get more used to the reloading process. They will work with smaller bullets later too.

Assuming you are not starting out with progressive equipment, an important step to take after charging the cases with powder and before you seat bullets, is to look at the cases all lined up in a loading block (do use a loading block) and make sure you did not fail to charge one (empty) which would likely give a squib (bullet stuck in the barrel) and look for any that may seem to have more powder (overcharge). In other words, look for uniformity of powder levels in each case. A good way to avoid over or lack of charge is to put your cases in a loading block upside down (primers up) and turn them over as you charge them; this minimizes the possibility of missing a charge or a double charge as you will be taking the next empty and upside down case from the block each time.
With small powder charges, never fully trust the powder measure and always use a baffle no matter the powder charge or type of powder. Once the powder measure is set accurately, check it with the scale at least every tenth charge. Be consistent with the manner you throw the powder measure handle. Inconsistent handle throws can give inconsistent charges no matter how carefully you set the measure. Don’t let the powder measure level drop below the baffle; this too can cause variances in the charge. And realize that some powders being larger flakes or cylindrical powders can cause variations in charge weight too.

Obviously, all of this is my suggestions based on my own knowledge and experience. You gotta do what suits you best, but please be careful!
 

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Lately I’ve been doing things a little different than I normally did. My empty cases sit to my right and are picked up and powder charged and bullet set and seated immediately. I look in the case before seating the bullet. I don’t know if this method is any quicker or safer but if you get called away in the middle of a reloading session when you return you know exactly where you were at.
 

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Lately I’ve been doing things a little different than I normally did. My empty cases sit to my right and are picked up and powder charged and bullet set and seated immediately. I look in the case before seating the bullet. I don’t know if this method is any quicker or safer but if you get called away in the middle of a reloading session when you return you know exactly where you were at.
I've done similar when i am loading while technically working.
 

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I've loaded 380 with Titegroup and AA#2 using lead and FMJ bullets. I tare each case and weigh after filling. My tolerance is plus or minus 0.1 grains. Yes, it takes a little more time, but I've never had a double charge and I'm not in a hurry when loading. I recommend the Lyman test block to be sure the reloaded cartridge will chamber correctly. I also like the Lee Reloading manual and cast my own lead with the Lee molds.
 
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