Newbie help please

Discussion in 'Semi-Auto Handguns' started by mlls300, Sep 18, 2011.

  1. mlls300

    mlls300 New Member

    15
    0
    0
    Really new to the handgun world. Have hunted most of my life but never grew up in a house with a handgun. Would like to purchase a handgun for home protection and looking into possible concealed carry. I know everyone probably has opinions, but I would really like to know a few great all around conceal carry firearms. Have been looking at Beretta's, Glocks, Sigs, to name a few. I think I want something like a .40 as I have heard it has alittle more stopping power than a 9 mm, but like I said I am new to this. I would really appreciate any thoughts or opinions as to a great carry gun that I can use for personal protection. Thanks so much in advance.
     
  2. trip286

    trip286 New Member

    18,658
    1
    0
    you opened up the floodgates... standby. I've just recently had Bersa suggested to me, after asking about the Walther PPK. But your about to get swamped.
     

  3. MrWray

    MrWray New Member

    6,424
    0
    0
    U r definately looking at some good guns so far, but certainly dont discredit the 9mm. The 9mm makes a great concealment gun,they r very pleasant "and cheaper" to shoot and they DO have enuf power to do their job. I can sit here and give u numerous handgun models tht i prefer but in the end its wat u like the best. I have a Glock 31 .357sig tht i also carried for many years as a deputy sheriff and i have a 1911A1 .45acp tht i bought a couple of months ago tht i now carry everyday. If ur able to go to a range where u can handle and shoot different models, thts a good way to make a quick decision of wat u want
     
  4. mlls300

    mlls300 New Member

    15
    0
    0
    Thanks so much for the quick replies. Hope I get a lot haha. I don't know that I would feel comfortable carrying a .45 because I'm 5'9'' and 170. Cost is a bit of an issue. I don't want to spend $1000. I am looking more at getting a semi although I have never even shot a revolver and am not opposed to it. I definitely need to get out to a range and shoot some different options.
     
  5. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

    21,332
    186
    63
    As the man said- get thee to a range. Try a .357 snubbie. Remember that an anti-tank gun may look nice, but if you left it on the dresser due to size, weight, it is useless.

    Differences in opinions are why we have horse races, and dozens and dozens of different handguns.
     
  6. mlls300

    mlls300 New Member

    15
    0
    0
    Is there a caliber that is more accurate than others? I think I read on the sig website that the 9 mm caliber is accurate out further than the .40 round. Could be wrong and remember I am completely ignorant about handguns haha. thanks
     
  7. TekGreg

    TekGreg Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

    2,000
    0
    0
    Shooting many rentals and borrowed guns is your best idea! Remember that the reload ammo at most ranges is a reduced recoil round to save their backstops and is not indicative of the power or recoil of full defense rounds. If the range allows it, borrow or buy a few full pressure (+P or +P+) rounds to get the full effect of the recoil and accuracy before you purchase the gun. ;)

    I can give you my opinion, but here are what the FBI and a 20-year police instructor with over 75 certifications has to say. I think you'll lose a lot of confusion if you take the time to read these two articles. :cool:
     
  8. TekGreg

    TekGreg Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

    2,000
    0
    0
    100% agree! Dresser guns don't save lives.

    Oh, and the .357Sig is the equivalent round if you want semi-auto instead of revolver. The performance is almost exactly the same, according to FBI statistics. :D
     
  9. MrWray

    MrWray New Member

    6,424
    0
    0
    Any gun will b as accurate as u are, proficency is key. As far as which caliber shoots farther? If ur just plinking around its sometimes fun to see how far u can shoot accurately but in reality most gunfights or confrontations are within 25 feet. So dont put to much thought into picking a caliber tht shoots farther distances than another,thts wat rifles r for 
     
  10. danf_fl

    danf_fl Retired Supporter

    12,358
    26
    48
    The 40 is presumed to be less accurate. The firearm is a large part of the accuracy, but the shooter has a large part, too.

    In handguns, the difference is miniscule.

    I have a 9mm that will group 5" @ 15 yards, a .40S&W that will group 2", another 9mm that will group 1.5", and another .40S&W that groups about 2.5".

    In my personal firearms, that means the 9mm is generally less accurate overall.
     
  11. danf_fl

    danf_fl Retired Supporter

    12,358
    26
    48
    Having only 1 firearm for concealed carry is like having 1 pair of shoes for everything.

    Good choices, but, an old man told me one time "I'd rather be missed by a .45ACP, than hit with a .22." In other words, how you can handle and control a handgun could be more important than the caliber. (And I've seen some of guys who cannot handle the recoil of anything larger than .380)
    If you cannot hit with it, then it is of no use to you.
     
  12. AznZOhAn

    AznZOhAn New Member

    633
    0
    0
    IMO, I would suggest a reputable manufacturer like Glock, Sig, SA, Colt, etc.... Get a gun that feels good in your hands and choose a caliber that has stopping power that you can also handle comfortably.

    I'm 6' 190 lbs and I like 357 Sig, 40 S&W, and 45 ACP for CCW. I carry a Glock 23 majority of the time and on occasions I carry my Sig 229 or 220 carry. The Sigs are more accurate, but they take the weather like Glocks.

    I like the Glock because it is reasonably priced and gives you reliability and accuracy, but a lot of people don't like the Glocks loom or feel in the hand. IMO Glock is a gun that will weather any storm, got to combat, the range, or the worse part of any metropolis and smile in the face of danger.
     
  13. Jay

    Jay New Member

    736
    0
    0
    This is strictly my opinion, and has worked in many years of firearms training, and for men and ladies alike. Buy a handgun just like you would buy a pair of shoes. If Ol' Joe over here says he likes Charlie China tennis shoes, and you're looking for a new pair of shoes, do you run out and buy Joe's pick, just because HE likes 'em? Probably not. If a new shooter is asking what to buy for a carry gun, it doesn't matter what works for me, or anyone else. I suggest telling that new shooter to go to many gun shops, and/or gun shows, and handle all the guns they can get hold of. Just like they would try on shoes. Before long they'll be able to make a list of guns that feel ok, pretty good, real good, and "that really feels great in my hands". The last two are the ones to pursue, and here's why I say that....
    If a given handgun doesn't feel "right" in your hands, you'll not shoot it enough to become proficient with it, because it's not comfortable, and you won't like shooting it. Just like you rarely wear shoes that are UNcomfortable. If you're not gonna become proficient with it, save your money, and buy a ball bat to carry. With proper training, and fundamentals, he/she can learn to shoot almost any handgun, or any caliber. Very few folks can re-train their hands to make just any handgun feel comfortable. The last suggestion.........proper shooting techniques, practiced slowly, but proficiently, will breed speed. Do it slowly, and do it the right way, every time.......If you practice speed first, and introduce less efficient techniques into your training, you'll have to do it all over again to get it right.

    By the way..... anyone who introduces a new shooter to our pastime by having them start with a large-caliber handgun, makes a very poor decision. Yes, some folks do ok starting out with large calibers, but the vast majority will not continue to shoot if their very 1st experience is with .50 S&W. Start with a .22 caliber something, and as your technique/accuracy improves, work up from there. Caliber doesn't count until after you can hit your target.

    There always will be a trade-off..... light weight, more recoil...... shorter barrel, more recoil... just sayin....

    Again, just my ramblings.... but they work for me...

    Shoot Safely....
     
  14. Alchemist

    Alchemist New Member

    266
    1
    0
    Kahr CW series... 9, .40, .45... Light, thin, reliable, soft-shooting single-stacks... Easy to CC and nice at the range too if you don't need high-cap.
     
  15. mlls300

    mlls300 New Member

    15
    0
    0
    Followed everyone's advice and found a local gun store that had an indoor range. I rented the xdm, and the m&p, both in 9 mm. Really liked both guns. Something about the xdm seemed to fit me better. I got slightly better groupings with the xdm and I think that mostly had to do with the grip feeling better. Plan on returning and renting a sig and HK to see how that goes. The store had a nice selection but I didn't like it when the guy told me that it was $7.50 to rent a gun and I could try as many as I wanted for that price as long as I was buying ammo. So, I bought ammo and used their glasses and ear protection and came back out later to find out that I was charged for using their ear and eye protection, as well as charged another 7.50 for the second gun. I understand that this is a business and they have to make money but after 65 bucks I was a little frustrated and felt like I had been taken for a bit of a ride. I may be way off here and am very new to this arena, so don't rip me too hard if I am way off base.
     
  16. Marthor

    Marthor New Member

    447
    0
    0
    I'd feel like I was taken for a ride too for renting $65.

    Since you were trying out 9mm and you mentioned you were interested in conceal carry, then I'd recommend the LC9 that'll fit in your pocket.
     
  17. Quentin

    Quentin New Member

    7,551
    1
    0
    It does sound like they took you for a ride. Some indoor ranges are better than others, Impact Guns out here isn't too bad. If you bought a new gun there, they used to apply gun rental fees toward its price and I assume they still do that. Also, I bought a Glock 23 there earlier this year and got a 30-day range pass that you could use as many times as you wanted. I haven't borrowed hearing/eye protection from them in years but at one time they didn't charge for it, don't know about today.

    I definitely would try a Glock 19 or 23 if you're still curious about 40S&W. I'm glad I went with the latter but will agree proper 9mm SD loads will do the job.
     
  18. Axxe55

    Axxe55 The Apocalypse Is Coming.....

    7
    1
    0
    i agree that trying out different handguns is the way to go. a handgun is more personal than a rifle or shotgun. what fits or one shooter likes might not be the best gun for you. if you find one you really like, lots of times they also make that model in several calibers. if you really like the XDm in 9mm, you might like it in 40 or 45 better. i just bought the XDm40, can't wait to try it out! good luck in finding something that suits you.
     
  19. Wambli

    Wambli New Member

    958
    0
    0
    $7.50 per gun is not that bad a deal. They have to eat too but they should have explained how they charge you better.

    If concealed carry is in the mix you might want to throw Kahrs and the Walther PPS into the mix. 9mm would be my preference for a newer shooter because of cost of practice ammo and also recoil and you are as well protected with a good 9mm as with anything else. Become a good shooter and the caliber of the handgun (within reason) will be a non factor.

    As far as size of the shooter my wife is 5'2" and she packs a Kimber UltraCarry in .45. It's all in the training and what you like.
     
  20. roscoguy

    roscoguy New Member

    178
    0
    0
    $65 does seem a little bit much, though $7.50 rental per gun is less than I've paid. That leaves $50 for ammo & eye/ear protection. How much and what kind of ammo did you use? All you need for testing is the cheapest ball ammo they'll let you use in their guns. ;) Save the expensive stuff for after you buy!
    I agree with others who have suggested Glock, SIG & Kahr. You don't have to shoot 'em all, just check how they fit your hand (and the price) & shoot your top picks. Also keep in mind that the best carry gun may not be your first pick for home protection. Let your budget guide you here.