New to reloading

Discussion in 'Ammunition & Reloading' started by cdegood2006, Apr 17, 2013.

  1. cdegood2006

    cdegood2006 New Member

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    I am about to start reloading first time ever.. Starting with 9mm got the reload equipment, but not sure as to what kind of reasonably priced powder to use, and where to get it. I been seeing muzzle loader powder but don't know I it will work? Any suggestions
     
  2. Armed1

    Armed1 New Member

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    Well you certainly don't want to use muzzleloader powder. You need to have something designed for pistol, and something recommended for what you're loading. You should get a reloading book or two - they have "recipes" with minimum and maximum powder charges for whatever particular bullet and powder you're using. Also a lot of this information can be downloaded from the different manufacturers websites. I tend to shy away from the loads that people list on the different sites. The info will also give you the proper cartridge maximum overall length, how much to crimp the case, and such information that is very important to know. Anyway, as far as powder, it's extremely hard to come by right now for obvious reasons. I haven't been reloading pistol for too long but after an excessive amount of researching I chose Accurate #5 which looked to be a good all-around powder for reloading my .40 S&W as well as several other calibers. Plus Accurate has their whole reloading data in pdf form on their website. I know I haven't been too much help but what I will stress to you most is read, read, read. my RCBS kit came with the Speer reloading manual and I read it a couple times before I started to really understand it all, and before I even attempted to load a round. It's very rewarding though once you get going. I find it very relaxing and it suits my perfectionist personality just fine. I weigh every charge and measure every round, but that's just me. I think that's all part of the satisfaction. Good luck and be safe.
     

  3. danf_fl

    danf_fl Retired Supporter

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    Welcome to the Forum, gents.
    May I suggest the you stop by our "Introductions" area next time you log in and say "Hi"

    Armed1 is correct about not using muzzleloader powder.

    Stop by a Mom & Pop gun store and ask for reloading brochures.

    The 9mm is not the ideal round to start reloading on. Something like the .38 Special is a little more forgiving.

    Here is a link to Nosler: http://www.nosler.com/Reloading-Data/9mm-Luger-(Parabellum)-Handgun-115-Grains.aspx
     
  4. atrbertothy

    atrbertothy New Member

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    I would recommend getting either the Hornady or Sierra reloading books. This books have all the info you will need to reload. And the 9mm will ok to start on. I started reloading on the 45 acp and the 223 rem. You can also get reloading info from Hodgdon's wed sight.

    For the 9mm I would use Blue Dot or Tight Group.
     
  5. Rocky7

    Rocky7 New Member

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    Get an intervention. Before it's too late.
     
  6. robocop10mm

    robocop10mm Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    9mm is easy to load, but can be troublesome to get the desired results. It is a bit finicky. Primers and bullets are hard to come by these days. Powder is a little easier. There are many powders suitable. I have used Unique, Bullseye, Red Dot, Green Dot, Blue Dot, 700X, W-231. There are probably 20 others that will work.

    Issues you may run in to: Glock fired brass generally has a swelled base that is not corrected by standard sizing dies. Overall length can be CRITICAL. Load as long as the magazine will allow. There can be large variances in case thickness from the wide variety of makers, this can lead to large differences in pressures. Sort brass by headstamp. The 9mm has a tapered case that is a bit more dificult to process than a straight case like the .38 Spl. or .45 ACP.

    Welcome to the "addiction". Prepare to spend just as much on ammo as you used to, you will just get to shoot a whole lot more.
     
  7. MaxImpactGuns

    MaxImpactGuns New Member

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    I'm absolutely new to reloading as well. I'm in an apartment but have some space I could use to reload. I'd like to reload 9mm, 40s&w, .45acp, 8mm mauser, and 12gauge. Do I have to buy a separate reloader for each caliber? I hope I don't sound retarded! I do have an OLD Hornady reloading book from my late father in law. I would have already been into this years ago but when he passed all of my wifes family swarmed the house and took all of his guns/ reloading equipment and what not. This was before I met her so.
     
  8. mseric

    mseric New Member

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    You can handload the 9mm,40 S&W,45 ACP and 8MM with the same press, you will need a different set of Dies for each. Shotgun requires a different press.
     
  9. apwvsd40ve

    apwvsd40ve New Member

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    since I have not seen anyone else say it..have you read "The ABC's of reloading? Most here will tel l you to read that once, at least, before your put any equipment on your bench.
     
  10. bigjim

    bigjim New Member

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    No, do not use muzzleloader powder. Black powder is an explosive, smokeless gun powder is not. Use the correct powder for the correct application. For your needs you need to find Win 231 or H-38, that might be a bit hard today with the shortages. You could use some of the shotgun powders like blue dot or Unique. I would suggest you go to Hodgdon's web-site and check under pistol/9mm for the powders that they make for that round.

    http://data.hodgdon.com/main_menu.asp

    Jim
     
  11. Dan308

    Dan308 New Member

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    For beginning reloaders, GET A MANUAL. When reloading you MUST use data that has been tested and published. You can't just "wing" it. You're working with components that are potentially EXPLOSIVE.

    NEVER load up anyone's "awesome" load or anything you see on the internet without double checking it with known data. What works in their gun might cost you a few fingers or worse your life.

    If you don't know the difference between black powder and smokeless powder, STOP what you're doing and get a reloading manual and read it. Before you get into powders, bullets, cases, and primers you should at least have an idea of how things work.
     
  12. atrbertothy

    atrbertothy New Member

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    Form the shotgun you will also need to get a different reloading book. With shotshells you CANNOT inter change anything like you can with rifle or handgun rounds.
    With handgun or rifle ammo yon need to use the right powder for the weight of the bullet, but you can chose the weight of the powder charge. You can chose the make of the bullet you want to use.

    Example of this is 9 mm.
    You want 115 gr bullet
    You also want blue dot powder.

    The casing you use can be from any one like winchester or remington.
    The bullet you can get from sierra, hornady, nosler, speer, or barnes. As long as the bullet weights 115 gr you are good.
    You need small pistol primers; you can get winchestet, remington, cci, or federal. You could also get tula primers, as long as they are small pistol you are good.
    The powder is blue dot; as long as you stay with in the charge weights you will be good.
    As long as the info you use come out of the any of the books or from the maker's web site of powder you are using, you will be ok.

    With shot gun you CANNOT do this. The shotgun reloading books will tell you this. Use only what the book says. If the book says this hull with this wad, with this charge of this powder, with this weight of shot; then that is what you do.

    Just remember fallow the instructions in the books and fallow the data in the books or off the powder maker's web site (such as hodgdon).
     
  13. Milsurpshooter60

    Milsurpshooter60 New Member

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    Yea, you are working on a controlled explosion, he gave the best advice i have seen , i would deff do some research ,maybe a few cd,s ,and some data books quickly , reloading is great but it only takes one bad round to change it to a disaster for you and anyone near you at same range.You overload the wrong round for the wrong firearm regardles of caliber could be very bad day for ya.I strongly suggest some homework before you attempt load # 1, or ya may end up wishing you never saw that reloader if ya still around to talk about it.It can be very rewarding but you do have to pay attention and make sure you do it correctly not much room for error .Once you have been doing it a while you know the pressure limits of the firearm you are loading youll be good, for example, i load 300 grain hornady xtps for my ruger blackhawk hunting pistol in 45 long colt with a very heavy load 22 grains of win 296.,you take that same round and stick it into a colt single action army it will prolly explode into peices and take half ya hand with it.And may kill you and the one standing next to you.DO YA HOMEWORK my freind, would hate to see anyone hurt from improper loading .And i am sure you would not want to hurt anyone or yaself because you did not know what ya need to know when reloading .After that enjoy many yrs of loading ya own if they do not ban gunpowder sales soon who knows what is next with this pres.
     
  14. MaxImpactGuns

    MaxImpactGuns New Member

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    Thanks for the info. I actually was noticing that the press for a shotgun is definitely a different purchase. But with the state of panic right now on ammo how hard is it to get powder, primers and bullets? And I am pretty sure that Corrosive ammo is NON reload-able?
     
  15. danf_fl

    danf_fl Retired Supporter

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    There is some ammo out there that is corrosive and reloadable. The first that comes to mind is some .45 ACP from or before WWII.

    What makes it corrosive is either the powder or primer (or both) used at the time.

    Berdan primed cases can be reloaded, but special tools and care must be used when reloading. That is why people shy away from Berdan primed stuff. Berdan primers may or may not be corrosive. It depends on chemical composition.
     
  16. Dan308

    Dan308 New Member

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    Seriously, slow down and READ some manuals. Again, you need to know the difference between berdan and boxer primed ammo. Once you get some knowledge about what's involved in reloading, you may decide to just buy manufactured ammo. The money you save versus the time, materials, learning curve may not be worth it. I mean it's just like making a ham sammich only these blow your fingers off if you don't put the mustard on right.
     
  17. Milsurpshooter60

    Milsurpshooter60 New Member

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    Depend on the cal ,primers , and powder how available it is , for any 30 cal or 45 they are hard to find right now along with pistol primers and rifle powder flies off the shelf.
     
  18. atrbertothy

    atrbertothy New Member

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    Reloading is worth it for every second of time you use. Example is where i'm at in pa, i can't get most pistol or rifle rounds already loaded, but i do have sampler time get the stuff to reload.
     
  19. Rick1967

    Rick1967 Well-Known Member

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    I will agree with everyone about getting a book and reading it. It is not difficult to made good safe ammo. But it is also not difficult to ruin a nice gun and spend a little time in the hospital.

    As far as powder goes...Titegroup can be used for just about every pistol caliber there is. The recipes are all found at hodgdon.com. You can use small pistol or magnum small pistol primers. Either is fine. Do not start at max load ever. Always use the starting load or reduce max by 10% if the book does not have a starting load.

    9mm is not too hard. Just get a book and read it. The follow all instructions to the letter. Overall length is very important. If you seat the bullet too deep you get too much pressure.
     
  20. therewolf

    therewolf New Member

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    A word of caution about scales and measuring

    powder. Get a Dillon scale, or something which

    will properly measure powder for pistol loads, especially in the

    3 to 12 grain range.

    I would not trust Lyman or Lee for scales.

    It's too easy to mis-measure the powder.

    I almost doubled the loads for my .45 with a cheap

    scale, and if I had not caught it,

    I would have been lucky only to

    wreck the gun.

    Seek some advice from someone who reloads. Get manuals,

    I've got Hornady, Lyman, Speer, and The ABCs of reloading,

    and don't consider it a waste, or that I have too much

    information at hand.

    Start-up costs are high, but this is a case where only the

    best is a bargain.
     
    Last edited: Apr 29, 2013