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Discussion Starter #1
with the way things are going with ammo cost and availability iam looking into reloading rite now i have 9mm, 45acp, 45LC, 44 mag, 30-06, 3030, and 50 beowulf. what would be a good setup to start with and do they make a good kit. any information would be great.
 

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Good luck finding powder and primers right now.

I use a Dillon 550, two of them actually.

Between 'Rona panic and the change to a regime folks fear being antigun, ammo, powder, primers and projectiles are scarce and high in price.

Sorry to be the bearer of bad news.
 

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Hi Scott! Forewarning- there are a BUNCH of new kids that have decided to start reloading- expect a severe shortage of components- primers, powder, bullets.

Standard advice we offer to any new reloader- go over to Alibris.com or Amazon, before you buy ANYTHING, buy a copy of The ABCs of Reloading. Read it before you buy anything else. Then get yourself a good handbook of load data. Yes, you CAN download recipes from the powder makers on the internet, but I still like having ink on paper. Lyman and Hornady are 2 popular handbooks- there are more. (yes, used copy is fine)

Seriously- do that FIRST.
 

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Haven't done much reloading myself, but most buddies with whom I've toyed around with reloads have used the single-stage Dillon the RCBS Rock Chucker equipment, with appropriate add-ons.

Always thought the Hornady Lock-n-Load multi-stage (progressive) press was a decent-seeming unit, but for the life of me I can only recall one person having said he had and used the thing. Don't seem to be many out there. Far more Dillons and RCBS's out there, for what that's worth.

I'd also recommend picking up at least two very good reloading books, if not three. Occasionally, you'll find an error in one, and it's good practice to double-check everything with another book or two.
 

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Scott
As Gator advised, Primers are like looking for a needle in a Hay Stack right now. A friend of mine who owns a reloading company is having great difficulty keeping his business running. And starting out he had thousands and thousands of small rifle, large rifle and small and large pistol primers. So that is the real issue at this time. So if you can find them your are going to pay a premium for them as well as powder like Gator said.
But good luck on your venture. I have used my RCBS Rockchucker Press Kit for years.
Loaded everything from 38 Spc. Pistol caliber to 338 Lapua Magnum Rifle rounds. For the money the RCBS is hard to beat.
But Scott I would ask some of the guys and gals here that reload more than I do where they get their primers and powder from! This since I have saved up for years and have some. And my advise if they advise of a reputable company and you decide to get your reloading equipment. I would suggest going ahead and ordering the primers and powder from them (where ever) and wait.
Also if you order On Line! There will be hazardous Shipping Charges applied to the cost of the order. If you can order or find it locally sometimes it is less expensive?;)

03
 

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With components (primers, cases, powder) -- You can certainly find it. You won't likely find it at a reasonable price, anytime soon.

One way to keep the costs down yet to get started on the right foot, in calibers where you don't have a ready supply of once-fired brass: for your "best" rifle, pick up a bunch of new Lapua brass. Most folks find they last for many reloads without issue; can help keep the costs down on the brass, given their longevity.

Have kept half an eye out, for a buddy, over the past six months or so, but he's balked each time I've found a given case of primers or powder, or whatever. 'Cause of the price. If you're willing to ignore the initial prices you'll need to pay, you can generally find the components without much trouble. (It'll only sting once. Well, twice. Once when you pay online, and once when you pay the bill once it comes in. :p)
 

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Discussion Starter #7
thank you all for the quick replies i will be on amazon looking to get books to study and i know cost will be high but when you cant find the ammo, the only option might be to reload what i have. i do have ammo for all my guns. i find it easy to get 22lr and 22mag and 12 gauge shells but look for 45, 45lc, 44 mag or 9mm and no one has any and not sure when they can get any and online prices are crazy then add shipping. i have a lot of once fired 9mm and 45 acp. i dont leave brass on the ground after shooting, most of my shooting is at privet ranges or gravel pits and it is not nice to leave it for others to pick up. looks like 50 beowulf is starting to dry up also glad i bought a lot of that.
 

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Right now is the wrong time to try to start reloading.
I've been reloading around 45 years, and would've never thought we'd be in the situation that we're in right now.
Luckily, I've always stocked up on most things, and have enough stuff to last me the rest of my life.
 

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Lee Turret works well for me. I like being able to change calibers by just popping out one head and popping a new one in.

Lee reloading manual, Hornady manual, and Lyman manuals are good. Lee and Lyman being my 2 main go-to's.

RCBS makes nice scales, tricklers, and dispensers. Go with wet tumbling and pins and bypass lead dust. A case prep station is nearly a must - plan on getting one eventually.

It nearly goes without saying - there's great reasons to reload - saving money isn't one of them - especially if you put a dollar value to your time.

I like quality ammo that's accurate for my rifles with suitable bullets. I shoot more and shoot calibers that you can't buy at Walmart. I also like having enough components on hand that I've given zero thought/worry about resupplying.
 

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Unless you shoot a LOT you are probably better off buying ammo than reloading. Gearing up with quality isn't cheap; making quality ammo requires quality components which isn't cheap either. If you shoot 100 to 200 rounds a month; you're probably better off buying ammo unless you're a precision shooter.

If you're thinking of getting into it to side step ammo shortage, you're probably too late. The shortage has already hit some components and will probably get worse before it gets better. Most component manufactures are focused on supplying the ammo industry right now.

On the other hand if you're looking to expand the hobby then by all means; it is a great hobby and very rewarding. Even so you picked one of the worst times possible to join the ranks.
 
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If my ammo supply was thin at this time - I'd buy a few thousand rounds of .22, a .22 semi-auti pistol and a .22 rifle instead. Sidestep / mitigate the crazy ammo prices completely. When things settle and prices relax - then buy your centerfire ammo / reloading suppies.
 

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Comments above are spot on.
To get started...
Read the books first.
For equipment.
I would recommend the RCBS rockchucker kit. It has everything you need to get started (minus dies).
You may want to add a good electronic scale.
Case trimmer.
Rcbs military crimp removers if using military spec brass for anything.
For dies:
Pistol dies, i like lee. Lee sets have the factory case crimp die included and are very affordable.
For rifle:
AR types... i love Lyman MSR series.
Other rifles i tend to go with RCBS. There are many choices out there though.
Books:
The RCBS kit should come with the Sierra book. I would recommend Hornady, lyman, any of the big brands have nice books.
Case cleaning:
Absolutely go with wet tumbling with SS pins. Lyman makes a good tumbler, Frankford Arsenal, RCBS. I would recommend two canisters. One to prewash brass. You do NOT want to put dirty brass in your dies. The other will keep your SS pins for final cleaning after you have processed the brass.

Where to buy:
Create a spreadsheet to track cost. You must factor shipping and hazmat fees.
Natchez shooter supply
Midsouth shooter supply
Midway USA
Everglades ammo
Xtreme ammo
Ebay
Etsy
Rock mountain reloading
Graf & Sons
Local: cabelas/bps , Sportsman's warehouse, CAL Ranch , LGS


Lastly, these are MY preferences and what i have found to work. If you stick with it you WILL find things that work for you and you WILL sideline some things. Don't get into a rush to buy "all the things " . You will go bankrupt! :D
Good luck and happy hunting!
 

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If reloading is something that you see yourself doing then if it was me I'd wait 6 months to a year and start watching the classifieds. There are going to be a lot of people getting into it now thinking they are going to side step ammo supply issues that later find out it didn't work and selling off their equipment
 

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If reloading is something that you see yourself doing then if it was me I'd wait 6 months to a year and start watching the classifieds. There are going to be a lot of people getting into it now thinking they are going to side step ammo supply issues that later find out it didn't work and selling off their equipment
This is probably very very true. I know i am waiting for a glut of resale market guns. Just saving my dollhairs!
 

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I'm thinking right now to help maintain my sanity I'm going to take a serious look at highend pellet guns. I don't have one yet and I doubt they have been affected yet
 

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This is probably very very true. I know i am waiting for a glut of resale market guns. Just saving my dollhairs!
One thing I've found, even this past year: on GunBroker, for example, when a good number of a given gun comes up for sale, there tends to be only so many people on GB looking for that gun in that caliber in that condition. And so, occasionally, one can wait for that "perfect storm" opportunity when there are plenty of "no reserve" offerings but seemingly the demand's temporarily dried up since everyone's already got theirs. Have been a few such opportunities, even with otherwise in-demand 9mm pistols.

Haven't seen that, yet, for reloading components. But then, I haven't been looking hard for those.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
i think ill wait and do a lot of reading and when they start to unload ill look at getting into it. i have always had guns, and in the past thought about reloading but ammo was readly available and didnt have the time to learn. my last dutie station i was the unit armorer so as for repairs and maintance iam decent there and since iam getting close to retiring iam going to have more time on my hands. so the next step for me is reloading.
 

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No one's mentioned the little Lee kits - everything in a small box, even today found for a few dollars. All you need is a hammer and a block of wood to reload. It's what we started with - 12 and 20 gauge - loaded four boxes a week on Sunday nights for years. .38 specials, 30-30's, and .45 ACP's worked well. 45-70's did not.

Lyman 310 tools are another option but dies are overpriced. I did .22 hornets on my old 310 tool with no problem. For smaller cartridges, they work pretty well. Even older, antique hand tools are an option and two of mine include a bullet mold built in to the tool.

As others have posted, the first necessity is knowledge. Best from good books.
 

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Yeah the Lee Loaders can be fun for out in the field reloading but I don't take the seriously at home on the bench. Their Hand Loading press can be fun too.
 
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