New to reloading, issues with .223 rounds

Discussion in 'Ammunition & Reloading' started by JonnyV, Jan 2, 2013.

  1. JonnyV

    JonnyV New Member

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    I just got into reloading about a month ago. .45ACP and .308 are working just fine out of my 1911 and Remington 700 but what I'm putting together for my AR isn't working out so well. The bolt isn't going the whole way forward with my reloads. They also don't come out all that easily when I pull on the charging handle. Takes a few smacks on the buttstock to get them to come out. I made sure that the case goes as far into the sizing/decapping die as it'll go. The bullet is seated to the same depth as factory loads. OAL is also the same as Hornady V-Max rounds. I do NOT have a case trimmer, I'm guessing this might be my issue but I wanted to ask since these are once fired cases. Any help would be greatly appreciated.
     
  2. elfmdl

    elfmdl New Member

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    I would think as long as the OAL is okay it should chamber, but I trim all of my rifle brass before I reload it so that would be my only guess, trim them down to the trim to length
     

  3. JTJ

    JTJ Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Are you crimping?
     
  4. JonnyV

    JonnyV New Member

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    I crimped some of the 55gr since they have the cannelure. The 60gr have no cannelure so I didn't crimp them. I am leaning toward the need to trim. A buddy at work has an extra trimmer he's going to lend me so hopefully I can get it figured out.
     
  5. Txhillbilly

    Txhillbilly Active Member

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    Crimping the brass shouldn't matter. I rarely ever crimp my brass.
    Are full length or neck sizing your brass?
    Is the brass once fired,or from another gun? If so,You need to full length size all of your brass.That can also be an issue,different barrels have different chambers,and if you just neck size brass that wasn't fired from your gun,it can cause issues like your having.
    It sounds like a sizing issue or your cases are very long-over 1.760". Most trim the brass to 1.750"
    Check the outside diameter of the necks of your brass.They should measure .2532" or smaller,if they measure larger then that could be your problem,or the chamber is really tight in your barrel.
    If the outsides of the neck measures are larger than listed,take the sizing mandrel out of your die and measure it.It's not uncommon for them to be a little bigger than they should be.This can be fixed with some sandpaper/emory cloth,and be careful not to take to much off-check the measurement often if your doing this.
     
  6. JonnyV

    JonnyV New Member

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    This is exactly why I came here with these questions! I did use my digital calipers last night and I know I'm "close" to the numbers you listed but I don't remember the exact values. I'll check them again tomorrow after work and see what's what. Hopefully I can come back and say that everything chambered as they should.
     
  7. JonnyV

    JonnyV New Member

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    Oh and I forgot to mention, I am using a full length sizing die.
     
  8. Popeye77

    Popeye77 New Member

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    I like to check case length for the first couple of loadings. Brass tends to flow forward in new cases (or stretch if you prefer that word). I also neck ream the first couple of times. Just my .02
     
  9. sarg1c

    sarg1c New Member

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    Ok, you may be pushing the shoulder back as you seat bullets...Crimping too mush...
     
  10. robocop10mm

    robocop10mm Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    OMG, STOP. If you have not trimmed the cases, you may be into very dangerous territory. Over length .223 WILL cause an overpressure that WILL blow our gun up!!!! Back up and start over.
     
  11. Sport45

    Sport45 New Member

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    I think this is probably the case. Look closely at the shoulder of the cases that aren't chambering and see if they haven't swelled out a bit.

    Stop crimping and/or buy a case gauge and check every round before you try to put it through the rifle. They don't cost much and can save a lot of frustration.
     
  12. tri70

    tri70 New Member

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    You should trim the cases to the 1.75-176 length, when you are seating the bullets, the die should be turned down all the way against the case shoulder and then a little more for the crush to assure it will chamber. This will push the shoulder down just a little and should fix your problem.
     
  13. JonnyV

    JonnyV New Member

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    The cases I've been working with were fired out of my original AR. I just tried a few that were fired out of my current setup and I had no problems. Case length on all is between 1.751 and 1.756". Infact, all the numbers I've been getting fall in the ranges that have been mentioned and what I've read elsewhere. I've been keeping an eye on the shoulder, there's no swelling or bulging. I guess I just have to buy some ammo and reload after I go thru it.
     
  14. rjd3282

    rjd3282 New Member

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    Dude you need to listen to Robocop. The very first thing you should have bought when you decided to load bottle neck rifle cartridges is a trimmer. The cases are to long and you are wedging them into the chamber this will cause a serious disaster. Please stop and go get a trimmer.
     
  15. Tenderribbs

    Tenderribbs New Member

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    Hey buddy
    Have ya seen any more coyotes up in your part of arkansas lately ? . Here's one I Killed last week in my pasture with my S&W Ar . Go hogs

    image-3876088389.jpg
     
  16. masterPsmith

    masterPsmith New Member

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    Once you get your cases trimmed to length and you still have the same problem, get a small base full length sizing die, it should solve your problem.
    I always use the small base size die for semi auto rifles.


    Jim.............
     
  17. tri70

    tri70 New Member

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    Have not seen any lately, plan on looking in the morning! Nice shooting!
     
  18. sarg1c

    sarg1c New Member

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    Sometimes if die are not set right for crimp or seating, they will push the shoulder back,( learned that one time) Easy to check with small straight-edge tool... IE pocket rule.. If you were neck sizing only they need to have been shot in your chamber( I learned that one once, loaded about 300 rounds of once fire brass, just not fired in my gun.....)but you said you were full length sizing so check the case for a swelled shoulder....Sport45 has a good post, a case guide could help you get off to a good start.Read what these guys are saying, they know what they are talking about. Have fun, be safe, wear those saftey glasses.. let us know what you find out, some one else may be readind that need the same help.. Good luck...
     
    Last edited: Jan 5, 2013
  19. JTJ

    JTJ Well-Known Member Supporter

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    As you may have read in some of the other posts, crimping does matter. An improper crimp can cause a bulge. Especially a problem with roll crimps. That is why I use a taper crimp die if I crimp. I also check case length and trim to a uniform length for the batch.
     
  20. sarg1c

    sarg1c New Member

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    Right, Crimping with the seating die can and will push the shoulder back and swell the case if not adj. correctly. The crinm gets too tight on the bullet and if there is still some travel left before bottom of strok, they will push the shoulder down. Just try a small straight edge along case and if so it will show... If crimping I crimp with the LEE Factory crimp die. Same crimp as on FEDERAL shells. AS someone stated above, they don't crimp rifle dies, but if not adj. correctly, the crimp is still there....
     
    Last edited: Jan 6, 2013