New To Hand Guns

Discussion in 'General Handgun Discussion' started by JamesC, Jul 8, 2013.

  1. JamesC

    JamesC New Member

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    Hi everyone, I am thinking of getting a hand gun sometime soon, but i am not fully sure what to get. :confused: I have fired a 20 gauge shotgun and a 12 gauge shotgun, a 10/22LR takedown and a Ruger .308 and a 1923 Mosin 7.62X54R. :eek:

    so i had fired a few weapons before :cool: but they where all shotguns and rifles. :rolleyes: i am open to some suggestions to what kinds of hand guns to use. i am looking into two kinds of hand guns, 1 when hunting. there has been a lot of bears where i live, so something to use if i get attacked. and the other gun is mostly for Home Def. another note i live in a state where i cant have any clips longer then 9 rounds. :mad: and no full autos. thank you for taking the time to help me. :D

    JamesC
     
  2. Anna_Purna

    Anna_Purna New Member

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    Hi James, Black bears, or big bears? A 357 is a great hand gun to start out with,. You and your wife/gf can shoot the milder 38's, and use the 357s for camping and outdoors. Revolvers are very safe for a first hand gun. And have enough power to hunt deer with in the western USA, while 9mms and 45's and 40s etc are illegal to use.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 9, 2013

  3. JamesC

    JamesC New Member

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    we have black bears here
     
  4. Anna_Purna

    Anna_Purna New Member

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    a 357 is capable of taking down a black bear. Shot placement and a hard cast bullet.
     
  5. JamesC

    JamesC New Member

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    ok but I was wondering how would the recoil on it would be?
     
  6. Anna_Purna

    Anna_Purna New Member

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    Some people don't like recoil. Some people can handle it. I'm 117 pounds and use a 44 magnum for work and enjoy shooting it. The 357 has less recoil, but louder. And if the recoil is too much for you, there is always 38*p's or just 38 specials. They are a great round to introduce to new shooters.
     
  7. Anna_Purna

    Anna_Purna New Member

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    Most gun ranges I know of will rent guns for a small fee to try out.
     
  8. KingGlamis

    KingGlamis New Member

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    I would definitely try to find a range that rents guns. It's pretty cheap and you can try several different guns. And welcome to the forum!
     
  9. Anna_Purna

    Anna_Purna New Member

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    I've carried a 357 in the mountains of Idaho, Wyoming and Utah and never felt uncomfortable when seeing black bears. I would feel under gunned if I only had a 40, 9mm or a 45acp.
     
  10. pawjr74

    pawjr74 New Member

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    EDIT BY MOD-

    If you stir a kettle of crazy long enough, you'll get some on you.


    C3
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 9, 2013
  11. ScottA

    ScottA FAA licensed bugsmasher Lifetime Supporter

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    No particular preference except for something that could handle black bear and less than 9 rounds.


    357
     
  12. Anna_Purna

    Anna_Purna New Member

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    Plus you have to look at it this way....


    Until you get to know any kind of a firearm, especially an auto, you have to practice, practice, practice. Not just shooting, but the racking the slide, removing the safety if it has one, fixing a stove pipe jam, etc, just to get the muscle memory drilled into your noggin'. So when you are in a stressfull situation, you will know how to work your gun and all of its functions. Where as a Double action revolver, all you have to do is pull the trigger to fire it. Everybody knows how to squeeze a trigger, and when something is chewing on your head, are you going to remember how to work the safety on an auto? (And yes, I know there are autos that have no safeties, etc, but most aren't capable of killing a black bear with one or 2 shots, where a 357 is.)

    So do you have the money to go shooting a lot of times (Thousands of repetitions) to get familiar with your weapon and use it like it is an extension of your hand, or are you looking for something to feel comfortable with outdoors, and go plinking a few times a year?
     
  13. ScottA

    ScottA FAA licensed bugsmasher Lifetime Supporter

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    I've never really agreed with the whole idea of revolvers first, auto's second. When it comes down to it, any firearm just isn't that complicated.
     
  14. Anna_Purna

    Anna_Purna New Member

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    Bring 2 beginners up to the the mouth of the river on the west side of lake Illiamna in late fall and lets see which one gets a shot off first :D
     
  15. ScottA

    ScottA FAA licensed bugsmasher Lifetime Supporter

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    It'll be whoever has the poly frame. Because the person with the steel gun won't be able to get the frozen fingers to move!
     
  16. Anna_Purna

    Anna_Purna New Member

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    lol, I said late fall, not January! :)
     
  17. Missouribound

    Missouribound Active Member

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    My kind of gal.......:D
     
  18. JW357

    JW357 New Member

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    I second the .357 Magnum revolver idea. Easily sufficient for either hunting or home defense. All you have to do is change out the ammo, depending on the application.

    I recommend a S&W in a heavier frame to absorb some recoil, with a 4" or so barrel. Or a Ruger. Both are high quality guns and will outlast your life, more than likely.

    But the best advice is to rent some various guns and see what you're most comfortable with and shoot the best. And go from there.

    :)
     
  19. txpossum

    txpossum New Member

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    Okay. I've said this before, and I'll probably say this again. And again, and again, and again. The first handgun should almost always be a .22. Why? Because it takes a LOT of practice to be proficient with a handgun. Most people can't afford the cost of centerfire ammo for the practice required. Get a .22 to learn the basics of handgun shooting.

    Having said that, a .357 revolver is an excellent choice for the SECOND handgun, or to buy ALONG with the .22.
     
  20. eatmydust

    eatmydust New Member

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    You will get more opinions on all kinds of side arms, but since you mentioned 1 handgun for bears, HD, etc. .357 with a 4" barrel fulfills your needs and will be a pistol you can keep for life and hand down to your children.......

    A 4" barreled .357 was my 1st handgun, my second handgun and then I got 1 with a 2 1/2" barrel, before moving into other calibers and platforms. .38 spl. is very mild on recoil from a full size revolver and the .357 will handle all of your other needs.

    If I had to sell/get rid of every pistol I owned but 1, I would keep my 4" .357!

    I may sound biased, but..........I am!:)