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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Took the new Security Compact to the range yesterday. Before doing so I stripped it down to clean it before we went and it was filthy. Maybe it's just my relative newness to gun ownership and the fact it's only the 5th new hand gun we've purchased but no other has ever been very dirty much less looking like it was used. The finish was perfect so I doubt it was actually a used weapon, but still I was a little surprised by just how dirty it was. I ended up cleaning and lubing it like I would after I put a couple hundred rounds through it. Is that normal? It doesn't seem to have mattered beyond a little extra initial cleaning, but I am curious...

The other thing I noted was the polymer guide rod. I guess this is common in cheaper guns like the Security 9 but I just can't bring myself to trust it. I already ordered a stainless steel replacement for it.

All that aside, it is a great shooter. The accuracy is perfect and it feels great even in my big hands. I'd read that the Security 9 needed higher grain rounds and that it would choke on 115gr but seeing as I already had over 600 rounds of CCI Blazer 115gr on hand we went with that anyway. It chewed through all 150 or so we ran through it without a single feed or any other issue at all. Considering it's about the same size as my Hellcat I was surprised by how much less kick it has compared the Hellcat. With my Hellcat, the wife was all over the place, but with the Ruger she had significantly better groupings, especially for someone who doesn't go to the range more than once every few months with me. I see why my wife liked it over some of the others she tried out before settling on that.
 

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I prefer the lighter 115 in all my 9's. I have a few boxes of 124 S&B left and it is a rough shoot in my 365, but fine in the full size guns.
Your wife still goes to the range with you- that is a good thing. Mine quit years ago. Finally got her back this year to an indoor range. I encourage all the guys to take the wife (GF)- then need to know how to be ready.
 

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Took the new Security Compact to the range yesterday. Before doing so I stripped it down to clean it before we went and it was filthy. Maybe it's just my relative newness to gun ownership and the fact it's only the 5th new hand gun we've purchased but no other has ever been very dirty much less looking like it was used. The finish was perfect so I doubt it was actually a used weapon, but still I was a little surprised by just how dirty it was. I ended up cleaning and lubing it like I would after I put a couple hundred rounds through it. Is that normal? It doesn't seem to have mattered beyond a little extra initial cleaning, but I am curious...

The other thing I noted was the polymer guide rod. I guess this is common in cheaper guns like the Security 9 but I just can't bring myself to trust it. I already ordered a stainless steel replacement for it.

All that aside, it is a great shooter. The accuracy is perfect and it feels great even in my big hands. I'd read that the Security 9 needed higher grain rounds and that it would choke on 115gr but seeing as I already had over 600 rounds of CCI Blazer 115gr on hand we went with that anyway. It chewed through all 150 or so we ran through it without a single feed or any other issue at all. Considering it's about the same size as my Hellcat I was surprised by how much less kick it has compared the Hellcat. With my Hellcat, the wife was all over the place, but with the Ruger she had significantly better groupings, especially for someone who doesn't go to the range more than once every few months with me. I see why my wife liked it over some of the others she tried out before settling on that.
Many have the polymer guide rod now. The rod and spring are considered consumables, but i have never seen one fail in a pistol that had not been abused.
 

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Many have the polymer guide rod now. The rod and spring are considered consumables, but i have never seen one fail in a pistol that had not been abused.
All pistols ought to come with stainless steel guide rods and they wouldn't be consumables. Some Sig Sauers have to have them to replace the OEM two piece junk guide rods from India they come with. Sooner or later (most likely sooner) they will fail. Sig should know better than that.
 

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The other thing I noted was the polymer guide rod. I guess this is common in cheaper guns like the Security 9 but I just can't bring myself to trust it. I already ordered stainless steel replacement for it.
I do the same thing, whenever possible. Adds a bit of frontal weight, gives me peace of mind. Good change, each time I've done it in various sidearms.

Just picked up a Ruger Max-9 9mm with a bunch of spare magazines. Haven't yet taken it to the range.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
All pistols ought to come with stainless steel guide rods and they wouldn't be consumables. Some Sig Sauers have to have them to replace the OEM two piece junk guide rods from India they come with. Sooner or later (most likely sooner) they will fail. Sig should know better than that.
I'm just glad I was able to find one as Midwest Gun Works and Galloway Precision didn't have them so I ordered from a place called ssguiderods.com... They processed it fast, but it's just been sitting at a "label created" status since Friday.
 

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All pistols ought to come with stainless steel guide rods and they wouldn't be consumables. Some Sig Sauers have to have them to replace the OEM two piece junk guide rods from India they come with. Sooner or later (most likely sooner) they will fail. Sig should know better than that.
Here is the suggested replacment schedule from glock. Notice the round count for the guide rod assembly.
Also, what most people don't realize is that engineers think about all this. By adding a metal guide rod, you are introducing metal to metal wear that wasn't intended to be there. You may very well be accelerating wear to another part.

1. Recoil Spring Assembly: 3,000-4,000 rounds (Gen 1-3). 5,000-7,500 rounds (Glock Gen 4)

2. Firing Pin Spring (striker): 15,000 rounds

3. Firing Pin Safety Spring: 15,000 rounds

4. Extractor Depressor Plunger Spring: 15,000 rounds

5. Magazine Catch Spring: 15,000 rounds

6. Standard Trigger Spring: 15,000 rounds

7. Slide Lock Spring: 15,000 rounds

8. Slide Stop Lever Spring (attached to slide stop lever): 15,000 rounds
 

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Here is the suggested replacment schedule from glock. Notice the round count for the guide rod assembly.
Also, what most people don't realize is that engineers think about all this. By adding a metal guide rod, you are introducing metal to metal wear that wasn't intended to be there. You may very well be accelerating wear to another part.

1. Recoil Spring Assembly: 3,000-4,000 rounds (Gen 1-3). 5,000-7,500 rounds (Glock Gen 4)

2. Firing Pin Spring (striker): 15,000 rounds

3. Firing Pin Safety Spring: 15,000 rounds

4. Extractor Depressor Plunger Spring: 15,000 rounds

5. Magazine Catch Spring: 15,000 rounds

6. Standard Trigger Spring: 15,000 rounds

7. Slide Lock Spring: 15,000 rounds

8. Slide Stop Lever Spring (attached to slide stop lever): 15,000 rounds
It beats a two piece guide rod separating while shooting certain Sig Sauers (P938 and others) and it will happen sooner or later. Mine happened sooner and it now has a rod from SS Guide Rods in it. They make a great product and so is the Sig with the new rod.

I'm always happy to have parts wear out on recreational things because it meant I had a good time with it. The chances of a catastrophy when needed for SD are rather small I would think. Should it happen, I'll beat them to death with the gun, hopefully before they get me.
 

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Here is the suggested replacment schedule from glock. Notice the round count for the guide rod assembly.
Also, what most people don't realize is that engineers think about all this. By adding a metal guide rod, you are introducing metal to metal wear that wasn't intended to be there. You may very well be accelerating wear to another part.
Might well be, depending on the gun in question.

But then, in the class of guns most people buy these days, the ones most likely to have plastic guide rod assemblies, we're in the sub-$600 range, often in the sub-$400 range. Once was, a gun was designed to last decades. Generally isn't the case anymore.

Certainly something to consider, when changing things a team of engineers spent awhile figuring out. Good reminder.
 

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Might well be, depending on the gun in question.

But then, in the class of guns most people buy these days, the ones most likely to have plastic guide rod assemblies, we're in the sub-$600 range, often in the sub-$400 range. Once was, a gun was designed to last decades. Generally isn't the case anymore.

Certainly something to consider, when changing things a team of engineers spent awhile figuring out. Good reminder.
CZ uses plastic guide rods on their 75's. I've talked with them about it and they say they don't have problems with them. They're more believeable to me than Sig Sauer. CZ's customer service, on the phone at least, is light years ahead of Sig. They make their own SS rod if I want one. Don't see a need yet.
 

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CZ uses plastic guide rods on their 75's. I've talked with them about it and they say they don't have problems with them. They're more believeable to me than Sig Sauer. CZ's customer service, on the phone at least, is light years ahead of Sig. They make their own SS rod if I want one. Don't see a need yet.
In the mid-'90s, I had a Browning BDM 9mm. Came with a plastic guide rod. Had a rod custom-made in (IIRC) 17-4 Stainless that made a world of difference. A moderately-large rod, so it was quite heavy. Very slick. Good corrosion resistance. Fairly tough. Changed the balance of the gun while firing, for the better. Much better balance. Overnight, far more accurate with the stainless guide rod as compared to without. Did a similar swap on a CZ P-01. Left another P-01 alone, with the factory unit. Can make a difference, I think.

Though, as folks have said, and as CZ has apparently said, there's not always a need and sometimes such alterations can have side-effects that aren't good. Haven't found any bad news yet, from a tougher, slicker, straighter and heavier guide rod. Not so far.
 

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In the mid-'90s, I had a Browning BDM 9mm. Came with a plastic guide rod. Had a rod custom-made in (IIRC) 17-4 Stainless that made a world of difference. A moderately-large rod, so it was quite heavy. Very slick. Good corrosion resistance. Fairly tough. Changed the balance of the gun while firing, for the better. Much better balance. Overnight, far more accurate with the stainless guide rod as compared to without. Did a similar swap on a CZ P-01. Left another P-01 alone, with the factory unit. Can make a difference, I think.

Though, as folks have said, and as CZ has apparently said, there's not always a need and sometimes such alterations can have side-effects that aren't good. Haven't found any bad news yet, from a tougher, slicker, straighter and heavier guide rod. Not so far.
Now that you've said that, I'll give some serious thought to a CZ SS rod for my 75 Compact. Can't go too wrong for $25 and it's made by CZ so it has to be warranteed. Maybe Santa will stop by if the cookies are good. They will be, the better half will make them, LOL.
 
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