Firearms Talk banner
1 - 20 of 20 Posts

·
Premium Member
S&W 637-2, M&P sheild 9mm
Joined
·
13,044 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Brown Air gun Wood Trigger Amber


Brown Handwriting Rectangle Wood Font


Seller indicated 1944 model, the tag under the buttplate says 1930. The action and magazine had lots and lots of gunk in it. After half a box of Qtips, a handful of patches, and lots of elbow grease, it is cleaner than it has been in many years.

The front barrel band is a little loose, no more room to torque it to the wood. Whaddya guys think, put a strip of paper board underneath? Also, can anyone read German in cursive?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,361 Posts
Date on tag is not mfg date. Date using the rifle serial number. This one is pretty accurate I have been told in the past years.

 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,313 Posts
Reading the troop tags on such rifles can be so much fun.

Check the SwissRifles website for some info on tag interpretations @ .

The flip side of the tag ought to have the serial number (or a portion of it) referenced.

Looks like ...

1930 = birthdate of the former owner of the gun?

Kan. = abbreviation for Kanonier = gunner (artillery)

"Blatter Kroop"? = Name of the soldier, generally, though I can't be sure of the writing's specific letters. Somebody fluent in cursive German ought to be able to get it right.

Geb Füs = "mountain soldier", or a fusilier (solider) of Mountain unit.

Stabskp (Stalskp?) 36 = I'm assuming is the regiment/unit in which the soldier served. As in, "Geb Füs Stabskp 36".

See this example: click. Or this spot for examples of military post documentation: click.

Hasliberg - Hohfluh = the town/district where the soldier served; Hasliberg Hohfluh is a small mountain town east of Bern.


Additional examples of owner tags:

 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,313 Posts
You know ... If 1930 was when the soldier was born, there's a possibility that soldier's still alive and around. Might be an interesting hunt, to track down who that solider was, in which specific unit, and to see if possibly you could connect with that person (or family of the person).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,791 Posts
His name was Kurt Blatter and he served in the HQ company. His home town was/is Hasliberg-Hohfluh [a village extension] in the Canton of Bern.

This is currently the only Blatter family in Hasliberg - might be his son -

Blatter Menk und Ruth (-Käch)
Unterer Staldacher 472N, 6086 Hasliberg Reuti

* 033 971 44 84

If you want to write him, we have a pre-formatted 'letter to the former owner' on our Swissrifle.com forum - in German, in this case, and written by a Swiss national. You never know, he might just be happy to hear from you. Note that some are not. The Swiss are VERY conservative, and can be very sensitive to getting a letter out of the blue from a furriner.

Just in case - here it is - firstly in English -

Dear Mr. (Name),
My name is (fill in name) and I live in the USA. In my collection is a carbine 31 with the serial number ( # serial).

I am writing you in the hope to find the Swiss soldier that was issued with this K31.

From the information I took from the tag that I found under the butt plate it appears to me that you may be the man that I am looking for.

Enclosed are pictures from the rifle, the tag and from myself.

As I do not know if you do speak English I had this letter translated for me in German.

I hope you to be the man I am looking for and maybe you can tell me a bit about yourself and the history of the rifle.

I do want to tell you that the rifle is very well cared for and it is in excellent condition compared to the others that I have seen as well as those that are
part of my collection now.

Awaiting your much appreciated reply,

Best regards

(your name)



This is the German translation by the Swiss member Dragunov.

Sehr geehrter Herr (Name),

Mein Name ist (name) und ich lebe in den USA. In meiner Sammlung befindet sich ein Karabiner K31 mit der Nummer (serial # rifle).

Ich schreibe Ihnen nun in der Hoffnung jenen Schweizer Soldaten zu finden, welchem seinerzeit dieser K31 zugeteilt wurde. Von den Informationen auf dem Etikett
unter der Kolbenplatte scheint es, dass Sie der Mann sein könnten, den ich suche. In der Beilage sende ich Ihnen Photos des Gewehrs, der Etikette und von mir
selbst.

Da ich nicht weiss, ob Sie Englisch verstehen, habe ich diesen Brief ins Deutsche übersetzen lassen.

Ich gebe der Hoffnung Ausdruck, dass Sie der Mann sind, den ich suche und dass Sie mir etwas ber sich selbst und die Geschichte des Gewehres erzählen können.

Ich kann Ihnen sagen, dass das Gewehr sehr gepflegt und in ausgezeichnetem Zustand ist verglichen mit anderen, die ich gesehen habe oder die sich in meiner
Sammlung befinden.

In Erwartung Ihrer geschätzten Antwort verbleibe ich

mit freundlichen Grüssen

(Your name)


Now if you don't want to send any pics just leave the "In der Beilage..........mir selbst" sentence out.


Good luck!
 

·
Premium Member
S&W 637-2, M&P sheild 9mm
Joined
·
13,044 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I squeezed off a few rounds through it today. Literally a few, my fingers got cold in a hurry. It seemed appropriate for a Swiss rifle when the temperature is 18° and there is 8" of snow on the ground. Kurt would approve.

174 grain PPU soft points were available at the store, so that's what it was going to get fed. There was a leaky gallon water jug sitting outside, of course it was frozen solid (minus a couple inches of ice), so that also seemed appropriate for a target. After sitting it on a broken arborvitae branch (no larch trees around here), I walked back about 60 yards to where I could get a decent rest.

First shot was high, second was low, third one definitely hit the target along with blasting through the small branch behind it. 😁 I'll blame the misses on my new glasses. The trigger pull had some creep but was pretty good overall. Recoil wasn't bad at all but I had a light jacket under my Carhartt to help soak it up.

The spent brass had some unique marks on the neck, is this a K31 normalcy?
Wood Nickel Auto part Gun accessory Metal


It's definitely a keeper, I'll just have to wait on nicer weather to put more rounds through it.

Atmosphere Snow Twig Natural landscape Wood
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,791 Posts
Congrats on becoming the owner of a finest milsurp karabiner on the planet. I've owned mine since mid-1989 and still get a kick out of it, oh, and its sister K11, bought a few weeks later.

There are a few things you should know.

1. Pierre, poster here from Kalispell MT, is THE maven on all things Swiss. He owns literally hundreds of 'em, along with all the other Swiss straight-pulls. His son Latigo is the head honcho at Swiss Products, who now sell direct to the paying public instead of via Grafs or Brownells - see their website for all the beautifully-made accessories and sights - every one made in the USA.

2. The Swiss do NOT use oil to lube their firearms - any good-quality light grease will do the trick. Grease up a patch and run it up though the bore while it's still warm at least ten times in each direction, then leave it. Before shooting next time, patch it out. Good to go,

3. See if you can get hold of some proper chargers - like the British Lee-Enfield, the K31 and its ilk are charger-loaded by the owner, When I lucked into mine about fifteen years back they were about a dollar apiece - now they are not. Don't buy the new plastic ones - they split in the cold. In Canada they can last maybe one or two uses...

4. Yours is the first I've heard of with a creepy trigger. The trigger is a two-stage affair - a long first travel, stops and then lets go. Says some fiddling has gone on there and needs looking at. Mine breaks at 1.5kg like a glass rod, and I've never touched it in 33 years.

5. Check to see if you have a soldiers tag under the butt-plate - some do. If so, we have a pre-formatted letter to the owner in the three main Swiss languages of German, French and Italian. Romansch? You're on your own.

6. See if you can find proper front-sight adjuster - sure, an modified nut-splitter from Walmart might do the job, but hey........this is one a huge range of the real deal, but beware, they have a hefty hanger along with them - figure on around a Benjamin at the very least for a basic one like mine here -

Auto part Machine Gas Nickel Cylinder


6. Lastly, for the moment - PPU ammunition is good stuff and has the correct bullet weight in FMJ or SP. However, be advised that it is ~200 fps slower than the real stuff, GP11, which truly is match-grade ammunition in every respect. Reloading for the 7.5x55 is easy - any of the heavier .308 bullets will be fine - I shoot SMKs of 175gr. I'll stir up Pierre again to see if he can post some load data - there is NO SAAMI table. Your sooty necks are from shooting PPU - they all do that, IME, GP11 does NOT do that. If you can find some of that, buy every round you can. It's a real thumper at 2560 fps from a 174gr bullet.

Here's mine, probably had at least 12 - 15000 rounds down it since I've had it - top is the K11.

Trigger Line Air gun Wood Shotgun


Military camouflage Camouflage Machine gun Air gun Trigger

Swiss Products clamp-on scope mount, 3/8th Warne rings mount and Weaver K4 scope. I DO have a more modern Weaver that I use for the x4 match - the light can get very dull here in the wintertime.
Air gun Wood Trigger Shotgun Wood stain

Be advised that production is under way for an over-bore conversion mount, but you'll need the clamp-on to clamp it on.

I also have a set of the last-but-one iteration of precision diopter sights for the 300m match shoot. Better than the Wyss from Switzerland that max out at around 500m, these go right out to 1000m and are fully authorised by the Swiss Shooting Federation. Note that although you get the rear sight you see, my foresight is a spiffy Gehmann infinitely-variable aperture and is therefore about $150 extra. The as-issue version is just fine for most of us.

Camera lens Reflex camera Camera accessory Cameras & optics Carbon
Camera lens Camera accessory Cameras & optics Lens Teleconverter


This was twenty of my reloads at 100m - as I was shooting so short I had to aim slightly left to compensate for the slight offset of the sight - in the usual military target it's just fine. Right-hand group you can see how it would normally look at so short a range - seven shots in there......

Plant Terrestrial plant Font Flowering plant Science
Insect Font Terrestrial plant Circle Science


Join with us on gunboards Swiss firearms pages, and welcome to the club.

PS - where are your K31 pics?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,791 Posts
Second thortz - you are going to be a reloader, fir sure, given the rarity of GP11 these days. I've used the same set of Lee dies since the early 90's, when supplies of GP11 here in UK showed signs of slackening off/going through the roof, costwise.

You WILL need to full-length resize every time you shoot. OAL is critical mainly because the GP11 was about seventy years ahead of its time, and it has a VERY long ogive that is only matched these days by spiffy and costy match bullets like Sierra Match Kings - my choice. With Berger bullets of the right shape costing $1.15 EACH here in UK, and an 100 mile drive to get them, I shoot what I can get.

I don't crimp my bullets, BTW.
 

·
Premium Member
S&W 637-2, M&P sheild 9mm
Joined
·
13,044 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
That's some fine shooting there tac. Very impressive indeed.

One pic and troop tag is in post number one of this thread.

I'm not a reloader, I barely have time to shoot so I just buy ammo. I have a stash of gp11 buried somewhere in the pile of ammo and accessories, I'm not sure if I want to break into it just yet. It's just going to get more scarce. I believe there are chargers in that stash too, I'll have to look to verify.

Sights: I'm not going to change them. I wanted a K31 in original condition and I'm going to keep it that way. Just kind of a purist in that regard I guess. I was eyeing the ones with diopters when I purchased this one, maybe another time. That gehmann is sexy, without a doubt. Sheesh, don't read that last sentence out loud. Lmao.

Heading to the Swiss products page to drool...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,791 Posts
TAC Thank you most kindly- just this minute ordered one of the clamp on scope mounts.
I just have two, one for each scope. A handy helpish tip, one that might be mentioned in the instructions - when fitting the mount, ensure that it is pushed right up to the lower edge of the cutout. It will NOT move even as much as a millimeter - neither of mine do - but it ensures that the recoil does not even begin to move it. As noted, mine are on and off my K31 with a degree of regularity and I've never noticed any creep. These things are beautifully made.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
27,150 Posts
TAC, I was working for a firm with HQ in Switzerland- got one of my peers there to reach out to the gent that had tagged the rifle. Unfortunately, he had passed away, but his son was pleased that his Vater's rifle was still going to the range, and wished me good shooting. And I started getting small presents from the folks there at HQ- sling, muzzle cap, strippers- and a very nice bayonet, scabbard and frog. As far as reloading, well, in this case, I DID read the story about the grasshopper and the ant. I have what is likely a lifetime supply of 591-1100. :)
 

·
Premium Member
S&W 637-2, M&P sheild 9mm
Joined
·
13,044 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I've found the 591-1100 ruag, it says the bullet is lead core, non magnetic bimetal jacket. Would that be a zinc jacket? It looks like steel in the white, no color at all.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,791 Posts
I've found the 591-1100 ruag, it says the bullet is lead core, non magnetic bimetal jacket. Would that be a zinc jacket? It looks like steel in the white, no color at all.
The GP 11 bullet contains a lead-antimony core with a jacket made of plated-steel or tombac. Depending on the year of production the plating was made of copper, brass, nickel or cupro-nickel.
 
1 - 20 of 20 Posts
Top