New here...reloading question

Discussion in 'Ammunition & Reloading' started by modernmopar, Jan 17, 2013.

  1. modernmopar

    modernmopar New Member

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    Ey guys, I'm new here. I've looked on this forum for an up to date answer on my question but couldn't find it. So here it is:

    Not including the cost of the reloader, what would be the cost of reloading be compared to buying ammo? My dad just bought 1000 9mm rounds for $190. I am thinking of getting a 9mm semi auto CZ 75 or a smith and Wesson Model 29 .44 magnum.

    Thanks
     
  2. potentialglock

    potentialglock New Member

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    For 9mm depending on the components you get you'll break even or maybe get off slightly cheaper by reloading. The savings really come in when reloading rounds more expensive like 45acp or 44 magnum. However components are hard to come by right now and once the cost is taken into account some calibers are cheaper to buy if you can find them
     

  3. Overkill0084

    Overkill0084 Active Member

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    Becoming a reloader only to save money is a fools errand. Especially if 9 mm is your only game. If you can source half decent ammo @19 cents per round, you will be hard pressed to save much money. My cast bullet reloads are probably about 14 or 15 cents per round. If you use good quality jacketed bullets (say $15 per hundred), it will be pretty much a wash, at best. That said, there are other reasons to reload. You can creat high quality match ammo for about the same price as crappy bulk plinking ammo. Much depends on your priorities.
    I like the versatility of being able to tailor specific loads to specific tasks.
    If you wish to shoot a lot of .44 mag, the whole equation changes. If you can't save money with .44 mag, you're not really trying.
     
  4. potentialglock

    potentialglock New Member

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    +1 I'm looking forward to driving tacks at distance with my 1911
     
  5. modernmopar

    modernmopar New Member

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    So how would you compare the cost of purchasing 9mm ammo vs reloading .44 caliber ammo? I they are about the same? I think I'm gonna go with the Model 29 if they are. I wouldn't min spending the time to reload plus I think it'd be a good skill to have.
     
  6. potentialglock

    potentialglock New Member

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    Those aren't really comparable. You have to compare cost or reloading and purchasing the same caliber
     
  7. modernmopar

    modernmopar New Member

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    I know the guns aren't, but the costs could be.
    -purchasing 1000 rounds of 9mm=$190
    -reloading 1000 rounds of .44 caliber=$199? (not including cost of reloader)
     
  8. potentialglock

    potentialglock New Member

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    Depends on which components you pick.
     
  9. potentialglock

    potentialglock New Member

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    Magnum primers are more expensive I know that
     
  10. modernmopar

    modernmopar New Member

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    Any idea what the rang in prices to reload 1000 .44 caliber components? About what would it cost with the cheapest and what would it cost with the best components?
     
  11. blucoondawg

    blucoondawg New Member

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    I have been getting my primers exclusively at gun shows to avoid hazmat shipping charges, I have done well in the past finding them from $28-$33 per thousand. Brass is a reusable material so you don't have to but it each time you reload, pistol brass can last quite a long time compared to bottleneck rifle brass. Brass will run you around .22 cents a piece depending on what kind of buy you find, divide that .22 by how many times you reuse each piece and you will find brass is very cheap, though a small initial investment. Just doing a quick figure off Midway website it would cost anywhere from $160 to $330 not counting purchasing new brass, these prices mainly depend on whether or not you are buying cast lead or copper jacket bullets, the lead is far cheaper and there are cheaper copper jackets than the one I picked to come up with the 330 price as well. You could also cast your own lead and further save yourself money. You would be looking at upwards of $750 to buy 1000 rds of 44 in 50 count boxes from Midway that is not including tax shipping and hazmat fee, so reloading is obviously saving you a ton.
     
  12. Olympus

    Olympus New Member

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    Best thing to do is a Google search for reloading cost calculator. You plug in the cost and quantity of the components you bought and it will give you a price per round, per box, and per 1000.

    Then start researching the costs of the components if you were to buy them. That will give you your reloading cost calculations. Then compare that cost to the cost of factory ammo and decide of its enough of a difference for you.
     
  13. 25-5

    25-5 New Member

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    You can easily just use excel.
     
  14. locutus

    locutus Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Reloading can save you a pile of money if you do it right.

    If you reload 9MM, .223, etc, get together with other folks and order everything in bulk.
     
  15. potentialglock

    potentialglock New Member

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    For berdan primers is it possible to deprime them? Or is it safe to drill through them? My mother is making jewelry out of them?
     
  16. Overkill0084

    Overkill0084 Active Member

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    Theoretically, yes. I understand it's a PITA though..
    Drilling it out? Assuming it's already fired, yeah, it's safe.
     
  17. Viking

    Viking Active Member

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    I've been handloading .44 mag for over 30 years, sorry I can't give you much of a comparison because I seldom buy factory ammo but I know that Winchester white box runs about $35 per 50. I also have hand cast lead bullets for 99% of the .44 mag ammo I have. It's to the point that factory made bullets are rather spendy, at least to me. So if it wasn't for handloading I really couldn't afford to shoot my .44 mag very often. I just got some CCI small rifle primers for $25 per 1000, dang good buy as even the discount sporting goods has them at $39.95 for the same thing, so do some research because it could save you a great deal of money.
     
  18. blucoondawg

    blucoondawg New Member

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    good job on the primers, that is one heck of a buy, I'm doin good to find them at 28 or 30 a 1000 at gun shows before this silliness started
     
  19. Viking

    Viking Active Member

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    Thing is just recently I became aware of two hole in the wall out in the sticks gun shops that sell components pretty much at their price, actually a gift from God since I'm on a rather low fixed income. It took the two to come up with powder, primers, bullets and used brass at prices I'm not about to gloat about because it may all be different in a few more days, but for now I'm extremely grateful.
     
  20. aandabooks

    aandabooks Active Member

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    I just started reloading so I might not yet be down to as cheap as I could potentially get when I really start buying in bulk. My initial batch of .45 cost $.163 each. I've since already started bringing that down. My next batch will be made up of $.083 per bullet, $.033 per primer and the cost of a 5.3gr drop of Bullseye that I paid $17 per pound for. Figure I'll come in right about $.125 per round. Cheapest I've ever gotten factory ammo in .45 is $.30 per round.

    These numbers would hold for .44mag. I know I can get 500 lead bullets for $40 and primers for around $33/1000. I haven't researched powder for that round because I don't shoot it. The real savings comes from having the brass already.