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Hey Everybody,
New to the site and am looking for some like-minded support. I'll try to keep it short and sweet I have always been into shooting since I was a kid. My parents taught me well about safety and responsibility. I've only REALLY gotten into guns and shooting in the last year and a half as I was finally able to afford it. I've been a career chef for the last 15 years and just became unemployed as the owners started suing each other over Ownership. The restaurant is closed now. I live in Denver, Colorado. I think I'm done with restaurants for good. Beyond family and friends, the two things I love the most are food and guns. I'm looking at options for me to get into the firearms industry and go to work doing what I love without having to deal with the drama, hours and schedule that comes with my previous career. I'm aware that since I'll be starting in a new industry, I'll be staring at the bottom but I am naturally concerned about making enough money to keep the bills paid. I'm posting this from an Air B&B in Phoenix while my mom is recovering from a surgery and my sisters are the only ones allowed in to visit (2 visitors at a time, they're both nurses and in charge of her care while I keep everyone fed). I'm at a crossroads here and just want some opinions from people who have more relevant experience. Thanks in advance for input.
 

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Welcome.... I think you are asking for opinions on where to look for a job that is related to firearms?
If so?....I'm thinking a large chain store like Academy Sports or Bass Pro...or even a pawn shop that deals in firearms. But, bare in mind...in those situations the pay is on the bottom end and not much chance for growth.
 

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I don’t know that anyone here can actually relate to your current experience. But jobs abound right now , so get the best one you can find and worry about the important things. That being your family and your own well being. The other stuff will fall in line once that is taken care of. Good luck man.
 

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Hey Everybody,
New to the site and am looking for some like-minded support. I'll try to keep it short and sweet I have always been into shooting since I was a kid. My parents taught me well about safety and responsibility. I've only REALLY gotten into guns and shooting in the last year and a half as I was finally able to afford it. I've been a career chef for the last 15 years and just became unemployed as the owners started suing each other over Ownership. The restaurant is closed now. I live in Denver, Colorado. I think I'm done with restaurants for good. Beyond family and friends, the two things I love the most are food and guns. I'm looking at options for me to get into the firearms industry and go to work doing what I love without having to deal with the drama, hours and schedule that comes with my previous career. I'm aware that since I'll be starting in a new industry, I'll be staring at the bottom but I am naturally concerned about making enough money to keep the bills paid. I'm posting this from an Air B&B in Phoenix while my mom is recovering from a surgery and my sisters are the only ones allowed in to visit (2 visitors at a time, they're both nurses and in charge of her care while I keep everyone fed). I'm at a crossroads here and just want some opinions from people who have more relevant experience. Thanks in advance for input.
Move to Houston. Plenty of work in your field or maybe make more in the chemical plants. Just a thought
 

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Lots of folks want to work in their hobby.
I am one of them but instead I work in the field I am good at.

That would be my advice to you as well.

I dont know your age, but if you are young a complete career change is also a viable option, but do not count on finding a job in firearms to pay the bills and pick something in the trades with guaranteed income.
 

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Unless you had a specific skill set already (instructor, Range Safety Officer, etc) that is going to move you towards firearm sales, and gunsmithing. Neither is going to make you wealthy, but there is a pretty significant shortage of gunsmiths.

There are 2 pretty good resources there in Colorado to aid in becoming a smith- Colorado School of Trades in Lakewood has 149 Gunsmith students. Trinidad State Jr. College in Trinidad CO has 1627 students in their Smith program right now. There is always the question- do you want to run a business, or work as a smith for someone that runs the business?
 

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Unfortunately there are two many unanswered questions to given any actionable advice. You mentioned paying the bills. If that's limited to a car payment and insurance it could mean ground floor opportunities at a range, firearms manufacturer or dealer. If bills means a car payment, insurance, rent/mortgage, food for a wife and two kids it becomes less realistic you're going to find an entry level job that's going to cover those bills. In situations where thousands of people are attempting to do what they love to do it typically cost a lot in time, effort and money to acquire the skill level necessary to make a living at it. For me it was a career in aviation. Unfortunately the pathway to making a living wage (married with four kids and a mortgage) turned that dream upside down, although I did get a pilot's licence and instrument rating but it would have taken many more years and tens of thousands of dollars to get into a position where I could financially take care of my family doing what I loved.

If you have very little responsibilities go for it. Apply to remington, Sig, Ruger, etc. And see what happens.
 

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Consider manufacturing, Ruger is in the state south of you. Manufacturing generally has the advantage of easily getting an entry level job, but motivation, experience, and knowing how to solve problems opens lots of doors to climb the ranks to supervision, engineering, quality control, etc. Another generalization, the more capable and responsible you are, the more money you can make.
 

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If it were me... I would go to the Glock Armorer school. There are 7 or 8 different stages, each lasting a day or two. A local guy is a certified Glock Armorer. He sets up at all the gun shows and sells and installs upgrades while you wait. Triggers, sights , optics, extended mag and slide releases, springs, barrels, rods, mags, holsters,Glock hats and t shirts, etc.. He always has a line around his booth. Also advertises in advance that he is going to be set up at gun shops during the week, and does well with that too. You always know he's at the show when you pull in the parking lot, he has an awesome trailer thats wrapped with cool Glock logos on the sides. Either that..or get into sales..our Vortex rep does very well.. He goes around to gun shops setting up and keeping stocked his Vortex display cases..
 

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First of all, welcome to the Forum! Glad you have joined us.
Coming from the weapons industry after my law enforcement career and still associated with several weapon companies.
I would encourage you to check into the manufacturing areas of weapons and related supportive products. With no experience to speak of coming from another profession but having the desire and interest into the weapon industry is a Plus IMO! At first you might not make a lot of money, but you would be getting experience, learn and possibly work your way up in the industry. And a lot of the companies have some sort of benefits for the employees. And the good news is a lot of manufactures of quality weapons and related products have already left or are moving at the present time from the East Coast to other states recently, being sick of the liberal left antigun trend, high taxes and all.
Examples like the new Baretta Plant in Tennessee, Mag Pul to Wyoming along with Stag Arms to Wyoming, Vista Sports buying the Remington Ammunition Plant in Arkansas, Smith and Wesson moving to Tennessee in the next year or so and many others recently. And a lot of their previous employees are not going to go move with them. Therefore, making job opportunities for others in the new locations! You will just have to do some research and phone calls or search the Inernet for related opportunities as one here also mentioned the Ruger Plant in Colorado and there are also other good companies like Springfield Amory in Illinois and others.

Good Luck on your new future and keep us informed! :)

03
 

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Welcome the the forum. To find a job that pays anything in the industry, it will probably be in manufacturing. Gun manufacturing involves a lot of machining and engineering. You'll have to move where the work is. If I were you, I wouldn't make a move like that until I resolved to get a valid college degree without exception no matter what it took. Why? A good education is priceless and without one, you will "top out" pretty quickly if you're good on a manufacturing floor. My 2 cents.
 

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Yes and no. Upper management and Human resource positions usually require a bachelor's degree. My employer used to require a bachelor's for any salary job. Eventually they realized there are lots of smart people working hourly positions that are highly capable of working a salary position, that never had the opportunity to go to college because of money, kids, etc.

Depending heavily on which manufacturing facility one would choose, there are lots of opportunities to climb, especially in today's labor market. We add several skilled tradesmen per year, which the employer pays for schooling in addition to your hourly wage for school hours. Pretty good gig. In addition, employees can have our employer pay for a bachelor's degree if it relates to the business.

Trade schools are becoming more popular by the day it seems. Trade school graduates are usually ready to start a job they day they finish school. Local manufacturers are snapping these graduates up as fast as they can, vs. getting the engineer with a bachelor's degree that puts his two wheeled cart in the shopping cart to get it across the parking lot.

Not being argumentative, but college degrees have their limits. Success with a degree depends heavily on what the degree is, how well the graduate can apply themselves, and how many jobs are available in the required field.
 

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I advise the OP that education has no limits. A degree is just the beginning of learning for a smart, curious person that wants to apply learning to job advancement. I never hired anyone that didn't want to look forward to jobs further up the ladder. The best people are willing to invest in themselves for many reasons.
 

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Taylor
The weapons industry probably has a place where you would fit in and have a career. But from experience it is a dog-eat-dog industry as far as corporate sales. I do not know of too many sales reps that have not changed jobs more than should be normal,
Weapon and related industry manufacturing companies might be a better option.
To also encourage you in another direction and other opportunities.
As primer said Trade Schools are worth their weight in gold for the right career. For an example my Grandson had the money to go to college but was not in the least interested. So, he enrolled in a good trade school. His study paid off!
He graduated as a CNC Programmer and also Operator. The day he graduated he already had a job with an aircraft manufacturing company. And I might add he has been making excellent money for the past 4 years. And two years ago he got married had now has a one year old baby girl. He has been able to buy a new home for them and a new Chevy 1500 4X Drive Truck. Grandpa is so proud of him and he is making more money and with great benefits than most of all of the college graduates, and loves his job. Bottom line a trade school maybe something to look into because as one mentioned, some companies hire a lot of people right out off trade school if they do well!

03
 
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