New barrel "break in", ideas?

Discussion in 'AR-15 Discussion' started by paul, Jan 17, 2011.

  1. paul

    paul New Member

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    Colt AR-15 Target Match, Mod. 6600, 1 n 7 twist, 20": shoot a bullet, run a bore snake, repeat 10, 20, 30x's, how many? Then shoot what, 2 or 3 then bore snake, repeat how much? I have time and patience, but, I don't like to waste time either, do any of 'yall really have a good knowledge on proper bore "breakn' n"? I thought about trying 'sanding bullets'. I dunno, seems if they messed it up, I'd get mad 'bout it. In past, my hunting rifles, I didn't shoot a hundred or so bullets getting it broke in, and they all shoot straight as a taunt string, with a slight upper word curve back to zero,:). Thanks folks for thoughts.:D
     
  2. Quentin

    Quentin New Member

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    There's a lot of voodoo about breaking in a target barrel and no one knows for sure if it matters one iota. I once read through the shoot 1, clean, shoot 1 again, clean ... repeat twenty times technique and seriously doubt I'd ever bother with it.

    Everybody seems to have their own favorite break in procedure and personally I'd just go shooting like I would with any 1-2 MOA barrel. Do an initial cleaning then shoot.

    Hopefully someone who's really up on this can shed some light because I honestly don't know.
     

  3. JonM

    JonM Moderator

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    personally dont see how it could possibly making any difference between just giving it a good cleaning then shooting and doing some ritual with cleaning rods full moons lucky charms and round counts.

    my remington 700 xcr i ran like 200 rounds of crappy machine gun 147 grn surplus out of it right out of the box after a barrel swabbing to remove dust and old packing oil. it shoots somewhere between .5 and.35 inch groups at 100 yards with 168grn bthp. the better i do my part the better the gun shoots.

    break in rituals in my opinion is just BS.
     
  4. diggsbakes

    diggsbakes New Member

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    I've heard this recently as well, especially when I was looking into AR-10's, but the article seemed to suggest that it was more important with .30 caliber barrels, as opposed to .223. . .?

    If it does make a difference, then what does that say about the barrel? I've never done this to ANY of my guns. . . but I will ask the barrel company if they recommend a break in procedure when I send my upper off next week. :)
     
  5. paul

    paul New Member

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    barrell break in

    This Colt isn't any where near my first firearm, been shooting 45years plus. And I'm not saying I'll do any "rituals", lucky charms, etc, to break in, I don't get those, must be attempt at humor. Anyhow, I just presented what I thought to be a reasonable question, one I don't have any answer for, to seek information. Thanks to all who reply, :).
     
  6. JonM

    JonM Moderator

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    Some of us are being silly because there is no real reason for such procedures other than superstition
     
  7. diggsbakes

    diggsbakes New Member

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    While I do see it as a silly procedure, it is far more than superstition. Here's a link to one Company that offers some of the highest quality barrels on the market. They definitely don't believe it to be superstitious and offer an explanation of why. . .

    Here it is:

    Break-In & Cleaning
     
  8. davcolburn

    davcolburn New Member

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    Great article! Thanks~
     
  9. Squirrel_Slayer

    Squirrel_Slayer New Member

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    While I know Krieger is one of the most recognized leaders in barrel manufacturing, I just don't believe in having some crazy procedure for "breaking in" barrels. I just shoot em, and clean them like normal for a hundred rounds or so, and then start working on my load work up.
     
  10. jhog

    jhog New Member

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    I used a box of Tubbs fire lapping cartriges in my Rem SPS 700 .308. All it did was smooth out the bore and it shot much better afterwards. Just sayin.
     
  11. diggsbakes

    diggsbakes New Member

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    I don't know if I "believe" in it. . ? But I DO know one thing. . . It can't hurt.

    The worst outcome is that you wasted some precious range time and your buddies laugh at you. :)
     
  12. russ

    russ New Member

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    From a machining standpoint, I can come up with a reason or two if I try. When the barrel is brand new, there will be some burrs and sharp edges left from the manufacturing process, even more so on a mass-produced barrel compared to a custom grade barrel. As you shoot, you wear off those burrs and sharp edges meaning you will foul the barrel less the smoother it gets. So, if you clean frequently during the first shots, you should keep from building up copper when the barrel is at its roughest.

    Like I said, if I try, I can make sense of it.

    FWIW, I did break in the barrel on my LR308. It sure can't hurt and lots of experienced shooters swear by it.

    All that being said, if the Colt has a chrome lined barrel, it's all out the window. There's no break in on a chrome lined or a nitrided barrel.
     
  13. Gloves

    Gloves New Member

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    Since i have a new barrel also this thread got me to thinking. So i asked Spike's Tactical about how to break in my new barrel.

    See question here

    Even though they suggest shoot all the ammo you got then clean it... I'm probably going to do a few cleanings while at the range.

    What's this about 'watching the crown' while cleaning?
     
  14. Quentin

    Quentin New Member

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    You need to be careful of the crown of a barrel when handling or cleaning. People who run the cleaning rod down the bore from the muzzle end run a greater risk of marring the crown which will adversely affect accuracy. Same thing if poor handling dings up the crown. Fortunately this is less likely if you have a flash hider/muzzle device.
     
  15. Troy Michalik

    Troy Michalik Is it Friday yet? Supporter

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    I read an article some years ago about target shooters that would polish their new barrels before ever firing a round through it.

    They would wrap a patch around a bronze brush and then apply either a lapping compound or rubbing compound to the patch.

    The idea, as russ said, was to get rid of the machining burrs.

    I’ve never done it myself, but it is one of those articles that I clipped and put in a folder somewhere for future reference.
     
  16. lonyaeger

    lonyaeger New Member

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    Who DOES that other than for a lever action or semi-auto?
     
  17. lonyaeger

    lonyaeger New Member

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    Well that's EXACTLY what I was thinking! Why take the chance?
     
  18. Squirrel_Slayer

    Squirrel_Slayer New Member

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    I hhave read the same thing somewhere, and since read that it's a bad idea. Too corrosive a lapping compound and you can dull the edges of the rifling, making it less effective and essentially causing the bullet to skid across the rifling instead of rotate with it. Not sure if any of this is true or not, but something to ponder.
     
  19. Troy Michalik

    Troy Michalik Is it Friday yet? Supporter

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    Someone with a pump 22, like me. :rolleyes:

    Well dangit. I guess I'll have to keep that in mind.
     
  20. lonyaeger

    lonyaeger New Member

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    Then we get back into that discussion about whether or not you ever have to do anything to a rimfire bore other than just run a boresnake through it. So why go at it with a brush from the muzzle end?