Neighborhood break-in

Discussion in 'The Club House' started by LunchBox, Sep 20, 2007.

  1. LunchBox

    LunchBox New Member

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    ArShooter and I live in rural MN. Nothing really remote, we know most of our neighbors, as they know us. The past week, there have been a few break-in’s close to our home, one that I know if was in broad day light. A few days after the first break-in, the suspects car was spotting casing one of our very near neighbors house. Having a toddler in the home, and of course all of our valuable belongings, this has me concerned.

    We have taken proper precautions; of course we lock our windows and doors. One thing that I am wondering is if the state of MN recognizes the Castle Doctrine. Last time I heard, we did not.

    Has anyone been in this kind of situation? Anyone ever come face to face with an intruder? What would you do if you had?
     
  2. Chuck

    Chuck New Member

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    It appears that MN does have this law on the books.

    http://ros.leg.mn/bin/getpub.php?type=s&num=609.065&year=2006
     

  3. notdku

    notdku Administrator Staff Member

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    I would think, but probably wrong, that you would be hard pressed to find a jury that would convict you for killing a home invader.
     
  4. bkt

    bkt New Member

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    Call the local cop shop and ask.

    Yes. No, thank goodness. Two shots to center of mass.
     
  5. Bidah

    Bidah New Member

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    Me personally, no, but my wife has. I won't bother with those stories.

    She also had a stalker. Whoever it was (and we never did figure it out), could see the house, or at least knew what to look for. The only time she would get bothered was when I was not at home, and was connected to my truck being there while I was gone. If I left, and took her car, which was normally in the garage, and left my truck, no bother. We moved a while later, and I made sure that the phone book listing would only have our last name with no address listing, and then we finally just went unlisted.

    My wife is pretty alert as well. She noticed that she was being followed home from the mall once (common thing for thieves, especially around holidays) and was able to thwart that one by going straight to the police station. She was able to give a description, and they were later caught casing the mall again later that same day, and were connected with several snatches when people arrived home loaded with gifts.

    Stay safe, and stay alert.

    -Bidah
     
    Last edited: Sep 20, 2007
  6. pioneer461

    pioneer461 New Member

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    Most residential burglaries are committed in "broad daylight" (whatever that is). They rely on nobody being home and not to return soon. I would call your local police or perhaps prosecutor's office to find out about the laws of self defense. In these kinds of cases, self defense is different than property defense. Make sure you know where you stand legally. Don't rely on friends and neighbors, or even fellow forum members for legal advise. There are many old wives tales about dragging them inside after you shoot them, that should be ignored. Doing that will only get you arrested for sure.

    Harden the target. Turn your home into a fortress. Get a good, quality alarm system, with local monitoring. Stay away from alarms that only make noise. More often than not, those only get called in after your neighbors get tired of listening to it. Contact your local police Crime Prevention unit. They can give you tips and references that most of us know nothing about. Organize with your neighbors. Make sure none of them are reluctant to call 9-1-1 on any suspicious characters / activity. Be sure they understand it is important to be nosy. Make sure the bad guys know they've been spoted. Call 9-1-1 right away. Don't wait for them to leave. Get a detailed car description and license number for the cops.

    Inventory and photograph all valuable belongings. Record serial numbers and put the list in a safe place. Get a secure safe for valuable documents. Get a quality gun safe for your firearms, and bolt it to the floor.

    There's probably a lot I'm leaving out, so it is important to; 1- contact the pros, and 2- organize.

    Good luck.