Needed foods we can't just reconstitute

Discussion in 'Survival & Sustenance Living Forum' started by TekGreg, Jan 23, 2012.

  1. TekGreg

    TekGreg Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    I'm constantly looking for basic foods that can last a long time on the shelf and be ready to go in a SHTF situation. However, I also collect recipes that use items that come in #10 cans and five-gallon buckets: red winter wheat, dry milk, egg crystals and dehydrated fruits, just to name a few. I've noticed that many bread recipes including loaves, cakes, pies and other breads have an ingredient required that you can't just add water to a mix: cooking oil.

    Obviously, most of us can go to Sam's Club and pick up a couple of five gallon buckets and that will keep us through several months of cooking, but what happens in an EOTWAWKI situation? Does anyone have a way to produce cooking oil without taking over a Kraft Foods plant? Is it as simple as collecting corn or soybeans and pressing them to death, or does it need further processing? Obviously the easier the better, but any ways to produce any sort of cooking oil with common tools and/or appliances would be appreciated.
     
  2. trip286

    trip286 New Member

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    Animal fat will do in a pinch. I've had birthday cake with bacon grease in it, didn't know the difference.

    What I'm getting at, if you have meat, you can cook. Maybe not exactly what you want flavor and health wise, but it can do the job.
     

  3. bkt

    bkt New Member

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    Holy cats. Crusty bread with BACON flavor? I just broke a zipper....

    Seriously, trip's right - there are almost always substitutes for ingredients. Google a specific example and you'll see.

    Check this out for some hints.
     
  4. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    Other than a bit of olive oil, I was probably 14 before I saw my first "vegetable oil". The fat of pigs. rendered at time of slaughter, is called lard. Used for frying and baking. Think Crisco, and you will be close. Also used a lube for muzzle loading bullets.

    Best biscuits you will EVER eat are made with buttermilk, lard, flour, salt, and baking powder.
     
  5. TLuker

    TLuker New Member

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    Same for me. I was probably 10 before I knew there was anything else other than lard for cooking. And C3shooter you're absolutely right about the biscuits, and the same is true for cornbread, pies, and just about everything else. Lard also has a ton of other uses.
     
  6. TekGreg

    TekGreg Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    Ah, so as long as there is enough ammo to take wild boar, there's a replacement for our standard, yellow, clear oils! Makes sense, thanks guys!

    Remembering back to when McDonald's used to deep fry in pure lard - that was when they had the BEST french fries! Going back to lard for cooking might not be a bad thing, especially if you eat food for its taste. :)
     
  7. trip286

    trip286 New Member

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    Hey, there wouldn't be a spear season in Alabama if you absolutely must use a gun!
     
  8. paintsplat

    paintsplat New Member

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    who needs ammo? In that type of situation a bow, snare, deadfall, would probably be better, no noise.
     
  9. paintsplat

    paintsplat New Member

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    just use a bow, (retrieve arrows) snare, deadfall. no noise, no unexpected company for supper.
     
  10. djl4570

    djl4570 New Member

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    If you have a patch of land for your preparations plant some olive trees. You'll need more than one so they can pollinate each other. The ripe olives can be cold pressed for sweet edible oil. The left over mash, pits and skins can be heated and more oil extracted. This secondary oil can be used for cooking, and it can be used for fuel in lamps.

    Otherwise lay in a generous supply of edible oil.

    Dolmas. The Greeks used these. Some seasoned starchy rice wrapped in a grape leaf and packed in olive oil. You can buy canned Dolmas at upscale grocery stores today. I'll bet the oil has more calories than the rice and grape leaf. I can imagine Leonidas eating one after replying "Molon Lave."
     
  11. winds-of-change

    winds-of-change The Balota's Staff Member

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    You can't make a decent pie crust without lard, too. :eek:

    Yes, I agree. McDonald's french fries were the BEST when deep fried in lard. It's never been the same since.

    But I think going back to lard for everything would not be a good idea. It really is BAD for you........but oh, so good!! ;)
     
  12. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    Yeah, they kept telling that to my grandad. He ate butter, eggs, smoked red meat, buttermilk and lard.

    There were 4 generations of us at his funeral. He was farming up until 6 months before his death at the age of 98. :D

    Diet has to play a role in health, but there are a lot of other factors in there as well.
     
  13. MrWray

    MrWray New Member

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    My great grandfather was 94 when he died and he never slowed down up until he passed. He ate the same way, people back then ate what they wanted and never worried about it. Now days its "that is bad for you,eat this" and "that isnt good for you,drink this". And people arent living near as long as our older generations did.
     
  14. TekGreg

    TekGreg Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    It's interesting that most people think lard is bad for you. In researching this subject, i found that fresh-rendered lard is mainly monounsaturated (healthy) fat. Processed lard has hydrolized, which adds unhealthy fats back in to stabilize it for a long shelf life.

    Lard is very easy to make, will store 1-3 months refrigerated and can be frozen. Do NOT go back to lard if you're going to buy it off the shelf, but if you want to learn a useful skill of rendering, you can safely go back to using lard to cook with! Check out the facts because, as usual, we've only been given part of the story.
     
  15. Jim1611

    Jim1611 New Member

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    There's a local locker here that butchers meat and they save the lard for you if you ask for it, that is if it's your hog they butchered. My family used lard for years. My great gandmother died at 101 eating many things we're told kill you.

    Another thing you can grow is peanuts. Lots of cooking can be done with peanut oil. Pretty good too. Getting back to some old fashioned ways isn't that hard.
     
  16. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    Jim- good point. We usually plant a couple of rows of Jumbo Virginia peanuts- because we like them. Peanuts are very high in protein, as well as having oil.

    They also make great deer bait!
     
  17. LeoGripster

    LeoGripster New Member

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    Another thought is this: Store Palm Shortening. It has an indefinite shelf life and a low melt point. It comes in the form of shortening or lard and when melted acts as an oil for breads, etc.

    They usually recommend about 6 to 8 gallons per family of four for one year. While it doesn't answer your questions directly, it is a realistic alternative in the mean time.
     
  18. Cattledog

    Cattledog New Member

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    Yeah cat oil could work. Denzel did it in Book of Eli, so it must be true....and gross.
     
  19. MrWray

    MrWray New Member

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    Damn good movie
     
  20. HockaLouis

    HockaLouis New Member

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    I don't usually recommend it to starting preppers but Crisco makes a butter-flavored shortening that lasts at least a couple of years unopened (like cans of olive oil) and up to a year opened (a little longer than olive oil). Either way you need about a third of your calories from fats which also tend to be relatively cheap, so, please, do the math!