Need to get really good at trap.

Discussion in 'General Shotgun Discussion' started by LandMonster, Sep 8, 2012.

  1. LandMonster

    LandMonster New Member

    148
    0
    0
    I have been shooting table trap and casual trap, skeet and 5 stand for 6 years now. I recently joined a club with a trap team and I need to up my game. Any advice on practice, method or gear that may help me take my game to the next level?
     
  2. cmhill

    cmhill New Member

    113
    0
    0
    Find your form and stick with it, practice practice practice. its not only physical but mental as well, if you start missing and get frustrated its going to cause more dropped birds. if you get bored with 5 stand trap and skeet try sporting clays if they have a course or look for one nearby. usually consisting of 50 or 100 clays set up throught a course our local course is roughly 2 miles or more long and changes monthly
     

  3. LandMonster

    LandMonster New Member

    148
    0
    0
    Funny you should mention form. I always have shot with what I call an aggressive stance. Weight forward, gun up, head low. Much as I would shoot a rifle. I was told recently that I will never be consistent that way and that I should pivot more off my back leg. Any truth to this?
     
  4. Virginian

    Virginian Active Member

    1,081
    0
    36
    Trap is a mental endurance game. To me it is a lot easier than skeet or sporting, BUT I can't keep my concentration over the long haul necessary to excel at trap.
    I don't think their is any one form for all shooters. I have seen an awful lot of very good shooters with a form like you say you have. I have seen Tom Knapp shoot WILD ducks behind his back. He says any shooting with a shotgun is doing it enough that your brain remembers the right sight picture - even behind your back.
     
  5. Old_Crow

    Old_Crow New Member

    990
    0
    0
    An overbored barrel will up your score. Quality ammo and good form will help more than anything. It sounds like you are already doing everything right. You just need to give it time to work. Instinctive shooters benefit most from an aggressive stance.
     
  6. tonydewar

    tonydewar New Member

    619
    0
    0
    what kind of scores are you shooting now? 15 20 23? you need a gun with at least a 26 inch barrel choked mod or tighter . for it to shoot a bit high is a plus (check it on a pattern board) 1 or 1 1/8 oz loads (if shooting 12 )of 7.5 shot. eye and ear protection and practice forget the fiber optic sights and all that crap simplifey and have fun
     
  7. tonydewar

    tonydewar New Member

    619
    0
    0
    funny how them wild ducks appear at the right time
     
  8. billt

    billt New Member

    1,642
    0
    0
    You didn't mention if you're shooting a trap gun. There is a world of difference between them and a field gun.
     
  9. Virginian

    Virginian Active Member

    1,081
    0
    36
    It's called decoying. And it was the real deal. I have also seen him shoot skeet behind his back - in person. If that was what we did for a living we might be able to do it too. Might.
     
  10. tonydewar

    tonydewar New Member

    619
    0
    0
    to start you should be able to become a respectable shooter with inexpensive pump or crack gun for trap with the right barrel and choke when you start 23+ consistantly start looking for the right gun.then when you get tired of trap go try sporting clays and be humbled
     
  11. LandMonster

    LandMonster New Member

    148
    0
    0
    Thanks for all the good advice. To answer a couple questions I am currently shooting 20 +/- not great but I shoot a lot of other stuff as well so I have not really spent the time to earn those 3 or 4 more. I am using an over under field gun and full choke. As I understand trap guns have higher ribs and maybe a little more sweep in the barrel. Longer too. I am pretty sure the problem is not the gun.
     
  12. billt

    billt New Member

    1,642
    0
    0
    That's not going to help you because you're learning with the wrong equipment. A bit like trying to chip with a 1 iron. There are major differences between Trap and field guns. Trap shotguns are designed to pattern high. The reason for this is because in Trap the targets are shot on the rise. By having the gun set up to pattern high, it gives a "built in" vertical lead necessary to hit the ascending target. If a Trap shooter waited until the target was at the apogee of it's flight, it would be too far out of range, (40 to 45 yards), to allow for consistent hits. A Trap gun allows you to stack the beads one on top of the other, and hold just under the target, firing as it ascends.

    If you shoot Trap with a field gun that patterns at point of aim, you have to cover the target to acquire the necessary vertical lead. Once you do that, you have no idea where the target is. This will cause a lot of dropped targets. This effect becomes even greater when you start shooting at handicap yardages, (17 to 27 yard line). Also, Trap guns are often equipped with very high vented rib barrels to further enhance this feature depending on the shooter, and what his handicap yardage is, along with his shooting style. It is not uncommon for AA Tournament ATA Trap Shooters to run 98 out of 100 from the 27 yard line to win top tournaments. This would be all but impossible to achieve with a field gun.

    Trying to shoot Trap with a field gun, is like trying to deep sea fish with a Fly Rod. Fishing rods are the same as much as shotguns in that regard.
     
  13. LandMonster

    LandMonster New Member

    148
    0
    0
    So what you are saying is that I need a new shotgun. Ok. Recommendations for a value trap gun?
     
  14. tonydewar

    tonydewar New Member

    619
    0
    0
    buillt must sell guns i shoot high 80s low 90s trap 80s skeet and sporting?well if i shoot my age im happy. and all with a beretta 687 field gun it has been fitted to shoot about 60 40 but to start out all you need is a solid reliable piece and lots of range time when you start chasing those last 2 or 3 birds its time to start spending the big $$
     
  15. tonydewar

    tonydewar New Member

    619
    0
    0
    and i do salt water fly fish
     
  16. billt

    billt New Member

    1,642
    0
    0
    You will do better with a purpose built gun. As far as shooting Trap with a field gun, yes it's possible. And yes, many people do it. That in itself doesn't mean you'll be better off doing the same. If you go to most any ATA registered Trap shoot all you will see is Trap guns. There is a very good reason for that. They allow you to perform better. Look at any shooter who shoots in the high 90's and is handicapped at 25 yards or better, and ALL of them shoot Trap shotguns. There won't be a field gun shooter among them.

    Nothing discourages a novice shooter more than missing. If you take up the sport of Trap, you'll be spending a fair amount to do it. Why not use equipment that will allow you to perform with the best results? By shooting a Trap gun you will be assuring yourself there is no disadvantage in your gun. Like most any other firearm, you can spend as much or as little as you wish, or your budget will allow. Remington still makes the Model 1100 Trap, which is an excellent performing gun for the sport. It's stock dimensions and point of impact are designed exclusively for Trap shooting. Another very popular gun is the Browning BT-99 single barrel, and Citori O/U models. They come in many grades, styles, finishes, and barrel lengths to suit most any shooter. They are very popular, and you will see many of them at most any registered shoot.

    One thing I would recommend you do before you commit to purchasing anything, is to attend a registered Trap shoot. They have them most every weekend all over the country. You can talk to people, all of whom are very friendly. You can have a great deal of fun while learning a lot before you buy. You will see everything from $800.00 Remington's to $35,000.00 Krieghoff's, and most everything in between. You will see for yourself why people who do this every week, use a gun that is built for the sport. Then you will be able to better judge what is right for you in relationship for what you want to spend.
     
    Last edited: Sep 17, 2012
  17. LandMonster

    LandMonster New Member

    148
    0
    0
    Thank you for your excellent advice.
     
  18. tonydewar

    tonydewar New Member

    619
    0
    0
    and shoot as many different guns as possable find out what feels right fit(ie poi) can be fixed later in most guns.
     
  19. Virginian

    Virginian Active Member

    1,081
    0
    36
    At trap, I shoot a field 870 Wingmaster with a 28" fixed Full or a field 1100 with a 28" Target Contour barrel with an IM choke, and I can crank out 24s regularly, with a few 25s sprinkled in. I do about the same when shooting a fully adjustable trap gun adjusted for me. The first round after switching is usually worse as I adjust. But, I prefer the field guns as it doesn't disturb my brain when I switch to skeet or Sporting. As noted, I need all the help there is there.
    You should be able to do better with a purpose built gun, but I have never gotten high enough up the pecking order in trap to know where that point is. Sort of like me getting a set of custom irons probably wouldn't do me anywhere near as much good as it does Tiger Woods. I have a friend who has a tapered plastic piece he clips on his rib when he shoots trap to raise the POI because he likes THAT gun, and he says that helps. A LOT of trap shooters have "stuff" on their guns. The freestyle benchrest equivalent for shotguns sort of, so anything you do or shoot won't be too out of place.
    Good luck with whatever you decide to pursue.