Need input on Hi Point 9mm

Discussion in 'Semi-Auto Handguns' started by rbranstner, Mar 12, 2009.

  1. rbranstner

    rbranstner New Member

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    I am researching to buy a Hi Point 9mm hand gun. I currently have a S&W 40 but it is really big. I want to get a gun for concealment. I have been reading reviews on line and over all most guys say they like the Hi Point gun for the price. I know they are a really cheap gun but I just need another for shooting around (9mm ammo cheaper than my 40) but I am a little bit leary about carrying this one because of a few bad reviews. Any of you own one of these guns and have problems?
     
  2. SGT-MILLER

    SGT-MILLER New Member

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    These are about the worst handguns for concealed carry.

    If you want something different, You can go the route of a sub-compact Glock, XD, Kahr Arms, or Kel-Tec.

    The Hi-Points are only good for plinking and service as a "tackle box" gun.
     

  3. skullcrusher

    skullcrusher New Member

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    Hi-points are not carry guns. You think your S&W is heavy....

    If you are looking for a daily shooter in a Hi-Point, go with the .40 or .45. Still, not a comfortable carry piece, imo. There are guns out there that weigh half as much and are smaller. Just my opinion.

    Still, none of them will only be $150.
     
  4. 8000F

    8000F New Member

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    You have got to be kidding, right? I hope all the people who ever decide to attack me use Hi-Points & Jennings & Brycos..JUNK. Hi Points are large enough to use for a small fishing skiff's anchor...
     
  5. iloveguns

    iloveguns New Member

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    I personally wouldn't own one unless it was just for plinking. But hi points do not deserve to be in the same sentence with Jennings and Brycos. My brother in law has about 12000 rounds down his hi point .40 s&w and has not failed him at all. And I actually shoot pretty good with it.

    I would not recommend for a carry gun. Spend another 100 and get a kel-tec pf9
     
  6. canebrake

    canebrake New Member

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    I think $150 is an awful lot of money for a door stop and its efficacy as a door stop is equal to its use as a PD gun. [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  7. WDB

    WDB New Member

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    RBran, What kind of S&W do you own now? As you can see on this thread not a lot of Hi Point fans and that is for a reason. When these guys get hard on a pistol it's something to avoid. Lots of expereince here and for the most part good natured people. How much do you have to spend on your new pistol? Is it for plinking or carry? I expect with a little more information we can point you to a few pistols to check out.

    Oh my personal opinion, I'd never own a hi point.
     
  8. SGT-MILLER

    SGT-MILLER New Member

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    Here's a little review from youtube that will open your eyes. Near the end of the video clip, you'll see some evidence of a busted Hi-Point C9.

    Now it's one thing to see a barrel that went kaboom. You can make argument about maybe the rounds were lead or overpowered or etc. This is a failure of the FRONT of the slide. The front of the slide completely busted off during firing. I do realize this is one pistol, but because the slide literally sheared in two pieces, this pistol is a no-go. The front of the slide does not experience high pressures like the barrel does.

    After seeing this video, I think people are literally taking a chance (although it may still be small) every time they touch off a round in these Hi-Points. This is evidence that the Hi-Point is prone to suffer the same problems as the infamous "ring of fire" weapons.

    If it happened once, it probably happened other times. It just wasn't reported to the masses.

    [ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eZrbACh8hM8"]YouTube - Handgun Podcast - Hi Point C9 pt.2[/ame]

    It's funny. The Hi-Point owners out there wanted proof that this could happen to this weapon. The proof is here, but alot of people are now making excuses.

    I used to like Hi-Points. I'll admit it. I thought they were the greatest little bargain out there. I have also learned that if something seems too good to be true, it usually is. There is a reason that the pistol retails for about 150 bucks or so. Think about that. If a new firearm retails for about 150 dollars on average, that means the manufacturer probably built it for a cost of about 60 buck each (top end estimate). How much safety and quality can you really get into a weapon for 60 bucks?

    Hi-Point is an official NO-GO in my book. Take the 150 dollars and get something like a PA-63, or a Makarov/Tokarev/CZ-52, or save a little and get a nice revolver.
     
  9. SGT-MILLER

    SGT-MILLER New Member

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    Here's some pics that I found that are a little disturbing to me:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    I have pretty much already kicked myself for ever owning a Hi-Point. I'm glad I got rid of them, and I will never get another one. I will not even accept one for free.
     
  10. Retiredfireguy

    Retiredfireguy New Member

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    My personal opinion is that it would be like carrying a brick around all day. I have a friend who's a gun dealer, and he says they are VERY poorly made and tend to break a lot. He sells them, but he doesn't recommend them.
     
  11. 741512th

    741512th New Member

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    The Hi-point is one ugly pistol.
     
  12. Mac79912

    Mac79912 New Member

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    I have a Hi Point that cost me $50.The gunshop was desperate to get the gun out the door.It is heavy but I have had no issues with mine.And if it ever jams on you you can use it as a brick to hit someone upside the head.They are fun to shoot but I would never tell anyone to buy it for a CCW.Save a little more money and get something you will be happy with.
     
  13. DonnyKC

    DonnyKC New Member

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    dont waste your money on a hi-point for a ccw gun. there heavy as hell. there made cheap. there a fun gun to plink. but i would not trust my life to it at all. if you are looking for a light weight ccw gun. get a glock. or a taurus pt111
     
  14. Arrowhead

    Arrowhead New Member

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    I always like to read the HI-Point posts and replies. Lots of differing opinions and I wonder how many are based on actual experience. I bought one a couple of years ago just to play with. My local gunshop sells them as fast as he can get them and doesn't have complaints about them.

    What did I determine from actually shooting and modifying a C-9? Here are my findings from actually shooting the thing. Looks: It's ugly, so's a Glock. It's heavy, so it doesn't have a lot of recoil. It is suprisingly accurate, especially for something that cost me $129 dollars. Ammo: I've shot WW hollow points, Blaser FMJ, and Monarch, both steel and brass cased FMJ with no FTFs, no stovepipes, and no jams. It hasn't stumbled one time. That is with good and the cheapest of cheap ammo. I'm thinking of doing some handloads just to see what happens. Don't get me wrong.I'm not suggesting that a Hi-Point is anywhere near the gun that a Colt, S&W, Ruger, and several other brands are. But it isn't the piece of junk that many make it out to be. If I had to use it to defend myself it wouldn't worry me a bit.

    The grips are slick. I used a Dremel and a small round diamond point tool and stippled them. Now it is easy to hold. The trigger was very heavy. A little experiment with the sear spring, or what ever you call iin a Hi-Point, and it has a much better trigger.
     
  15. SGT-MILLER

    SGT-MILLER New Member

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    Lets try this. I will post some facts about the Hi-Point, and people can make their best educated decision based on that information.

    As a side note, I have owned, and fired the .380, 9mm, and the .45 ACP Hi-Point pistols. I have experience with these firearms, but I will leave that out since my experience doesn't really make a difference to anyone but me in the end.

    Note 1:

    Most people know that the Hi-Point company (aka MKS / Beemiller) uses the metal compound known as Zamak-3 for their slides on their handguns. Zamak-3 is also referred to as "Pot Metal". Here is a quick basic description of Pot Metal and it's limitations (credit to Wikipedia).

    Pot metal

    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Jump to: navigation, search
    Pot metal is a slang term that refers to alloys that consist of inexpensive, low-melting point metals used to make fast, inexpensive castings. There is no scientific metallurgical standard for pot metal; common metals in pot metal include zinc, lead, copper, tin, magnesium, aluminium, iron, and cadmium. The primary advantage of pot metal is that it is quick and easy to cast. Due to its low melting temperature no sophisticated foundry equipment is needed and specialized molds are not necessary. It is sometimes used to experiment with molds and ideas before using metals of higher quality. It is sometime referred to as white metal, die-cast zinc, or monkey metal.[1] Examples of items created from pot metal include toys, furniture fittings, tool parts, electronics components, and automotive parts.[citation needed]
    Pot metal can be prone to instability over time, as it has a tendency to bend, distort, crack, shatter, and pit with age.[1] The low boiling point of zinc and the fast cooling of the newly-cast part often allow air bubbles to remain within the cast part, weakening the metal.[1] Many of the components of pot metal are susceptible to corrosion from airborne acids and other contaminants, and the internal corrosion of the metal often causes the decorative plating to flake off.[citation needed] Pot metal is not easily glued, soldered or welded.[1]
    At one time, "pot metal" referred to a copper alloy that was primarily alloyed with lead. 67% Cu, 29% Pb & 4% Sb and 80 Cu, 20% Pb were common formulations.[2]
    The primary component of pot metal is zinc, but often the caster adds other metals to the mix to strengthen the cast part, improve the flow of the molten metal, or to reduce cost.[dubiousdiscuss] With a low melting point of 419 °C (786 °F), zinc is often alloyed with other metals including lead, tin, aluminium and copper.




    Read the limitations carefully as determine for yourself if this substance is strong and stable enough for prolonged use in a firearm (take into consideration the constant exposure to high pressures from fired rounds on a regular basis).


    Note 2:


    As you all may know, the handguns from Hi-Point have an MSRP of around 180 dollars (JCP .40 and .45) or lower. This makes for a very inexpensive firearm. Taking the standard business practices into account, one can only figure out that the handgun itself cost much less to produce.


    An example would be if the handgun retails at 180 dollars, the dealer maybe purchased it at around 100 dollars or less. With that in mind, the company originally selling to the dealer needs to make a profit also. With that said, there is a very good chance that the company is most likely putting about 40-50 dollars into each handgun. Think of the overhead, wages, supplies, maintainence, etc.... and that will figure into the dealer price.


    Here's a few questions I ask all of you to ask yourself when purchasing a new firearm, regardless of model.


    1. What are the materials used and how is the quality of those materials (is there the possibility of the company cutting corners in order to cut costs)?


    2. What quality control is put into the development of this firearm (i.e. can a gun be produced with good quality when only 40-50 dollars is spent per gun from start to finished product)?


    3. What is the track record of the company producing the firearm?


    4. (MOST IMPORTANT) Does this firearm fit your needs and wants?
     
  16. DonnyKC

    DonnyKC New Member

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    thanks for the facts..
     
  17. cpttango30

    cpttango30 New Member

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    Ask yourself one question...

    What is your life and the life of your loved ones worth?

    I know my life is worth a whole lot more than a Hi-point.
     
  18. Merc187

    Merc187 New Member

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    When searching for a firearm that will be used for an application such as CCW, I tend to not look so much at price. Reliability is worth allot more than Hi Point has to offer. As a plinker (or a throw gun) I am sure they have their place. Unfortunately, it is not in my safe, tool box, tackle box or scrap metal box. I have fired a few of these in 9mm and .45 with very poor results.

    If I can not rely on it 100% then I will not buy it, or even have it given to me. When SHTF and you have to grab something, I would rather it be something I know will "just work".
     
    Last edited: Mar 25, 2009
  19. chucksolo69

    chucksolo69 New Member

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    I have an indigent friend (not employed) who bought one of these just so he could shoot something. Aside from the appearance (butt ugly) it seems to function well and when I have shot it, I have had no issues with it. As for the construction of the gun, pot metal, et al, I doubt these guns are supposed to be subjected to constant firing. I would put this gun in the occassional firing catagory where you fire it just to make sure it still functions if you ever need it. I doubt I would ever buy one, and the only "budget" gun I own is a Bersa Thunder .380 which is pretty well made. Even so, all guns have their detractors. If you use a gun within its limits, then the gun should serve its intended purpose. For example: I don't plan on shooting my Bersa like I do my SIG Mosquito or my CZ 75B. I shoot a couple of hundred rounds through them each time I go to the range; I usually go 3 to 4 times a month. I will probably shoot it once or twice a year, maybe 50-100 rounds each time just to keep sharp with it. That being said, just keep in mind what a Hi-Point pistol is meant to be and it should serve you well. As for carrying one for SD, I should think it would get tiring after a couple of hours.
     
  20. drdarwinn

    drdarwinn New Member

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    Hi Point

    I have the hi point 9mm and 380 ACP and they are both great pistols. The look is bulky but still a rugged and accurate weapon for the price. I have a Jennings 9 and 380 as well, and have problems with the heavy trigger and certain Ammo. Between the two...I suggest the Hi-Point.