Need help with .223 Recipe

Discussion in 'Ammunition & Reloading' started by texaswoodworker, Oct 29, 2013.

  1. texaswoodworker

    texaswoodworker New Member

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    I'm working up a recipe for a good hunting round, but the data for the bullet I have is a little hard to find. I'm using IMR 4320 and a 65gr Sierra GameKing bullet.

    This is the most useful source I have found for this data yet.

    http://www.imrpowder.com/data/rifle/223rem-2005mar28.php

    It doesn't list a 65gr GameKing, but it lists something called a 63gr SIE SP. I assume this means it's a Sierra Soft Point. Correct?

    Here's what's listed.



    Would the data for this bullet be ok to use with the 65gr GameKing bullets?
     
  2. bntyhntr6975

    bntyhntr6975 New Member

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    I believe that 63g Sierra is a semi-point. Still a soft point, just more rounded than the 65g spitzer youre wanting to load. As usual, the heavier the bullet, the less powder you put behind it. So you should be good assuming your start and max numbers are reduced a little. Actual length will be determined by the firearm chamber and magazine, im pretty sure you already know that but just in case.
    Since there is no cannalure, i assume this is for a bolt gun? Otherwise, crimping for an auto is going to be difficult. Once again, just in case.
    You can also contact Sierra and double check with them, never a bad idea anyway.
     

  3. mseric

    mseric New Member

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    Sure, 2gr of bullet weight isn't going to affect much as far as powder charge goes. Just start low and work up.
     
  4. jpattersonnh

    jpattersonnh Active Member

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    The only issue you will find w/ IMR4320 in a .223 semi auto is cycling issues. It is a fine line on what will cycle and what will not. 4064 is more forgiving.
     
  5. texaswoodworker

    texaswoodworker New Member

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    Awesome! The gun is an AR so IIRC, they have a longer chamber than a bolt gun correct?

    Thanks. :)

    I normally use a flat base 55gr hollow point with 23-24gr (IIRC, I don't have my book handy) of IMR 4320. No cycling issues yet. :D
     
  6. bntyhntr6975

    bntyhntr6975 New Member

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    Neck tension only may or may not keep that bullet in place. Theres alot of enertia present upon chambering and recoil. Keep an eye on them for bullet set back. I havent tried any uncrimped bullets in my ARs, so I really cant say.

    As far as the chamber goes, you should be fine. Your max length for the magazine is going to be short enough that you wont have to worry about being so long as to jam into the rifling.
     
  7. ColdIron44

    ColdIron44 New Member

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    Funny you stumbled on that load combination. I did a lot of load development for my .223's and the most accurate load I found for my rifles was with those same 65 SGKs and IMR 4320. I remember cross referencing data from Lyman and the hodgdon website using information for the 63gr and 69gr Sierra bullets. Then I started low and worked up until I hit a sweet spot. I never encountered any signs of low or high pressure. When I get home I'll post my data and a picture of the group.
     
  8. texaswoodworker

    texaswoodworker New Member

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    I usually don't crimp my .223 rounds. I haven't had a problem yet. I just keep an eye out for set back. :D

    Awesome! Thanks! :D
     
  9. mseric

    mseric New Member

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    Actually "set-Back" isn't as big a problem as forward creep. Bullets without adequate neck tension can actually creep forward when the action closes, some so much that the bullet come right out of the case.

    I crimp all my semi-auto ammo with the Lee Factory Crimp die.
     
  10. texaswoodworker

    texaswoodworker New Member

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    I plan on ordering a crimp die next time I order reloading supplies from Midway USA, but for now the bullets seem to stay where I set them.
     
  11. Txhillbilly

    Txhillbilly Active Member

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    I have never needed to crimp any bullet for any caliber AR,and the 223 is at the low end of my spectrum.
    If you are using good brass that isn't work hardened,and have your dies set up correctly,you will always have plenty of neck tension holding the bullets right where you seated them in the case.
    The inertia in my 458 SOCOM and 260 Remington are far greater than any 223 caliber weapon,and I have no need in crimping them.

    TWW,I'll run out to the shop and dig up some of my load data on this bullet for you. I'll be back in a few minutes!
     
  12. Txhillbilly

    Txhillbilly Active Member

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    Aaron,Sierra's load data for that powder isn't very good for that bullet. It shows 24.9 grains - 25.7 grains,and the velocity is pretty slow - 2600 to 2700 FPS.

    I use H335 for that bullet. I'm using 25.2 grains in my RRA 20" Varminter at around 2900 FPS,and 24.5 grains in my Savage 12 FLVSS. The velocity is almost the same in both rifle's,but the Savage has 6" more barrel length.

    H335 and Ramshot TAC are the two preferred powders in the Sierra load manual.
     
  13. texaswoodworker

    texaswoodworker New Member

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    I've been meaning to try some other powders for .223, I just haven't had the extra funds lately. (will soon though :D). IMR 4320 is what I use in my 30-06, so I was making due with it in my .223. It's pretty accurate. I've actually gotten my best group ever using that powder in my .223. :D

    For now, would the 2600-2700 FPS suffice for hunting?

    Thanks for the info. :)
     
  14. ColdIron44

    ColdIron44 New Member

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    5 shot group at 100 yards. My personal standards for accuracy demand performance with high barrel temps. Though this group is nothing to write home about, I like this load because it makes holes like this every time, in bolts and semi-autos, and I like the way the 4320 meters as opposed to ball powders and longer cut extrusions. It's my go-to .223 deer load now and it cracks me up because I never would have used those bullets or that powder if the shelves at the store weren't empty. I'm working out some .25-06 loads this weekend, I'll run a few of those .223's through the chrono and let you know where they're at. Good luck!
     

    Attached Files:

  15. Txhillbilly

    Txhillbilly Active Member

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    It'll work fine for the ranges intended as long as your rifle shoots groups them well.
    H335 has always been my main 223 go to powder for most bullets.
     
  16. texaswoodworker

    texaswoodworker New Member

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    I think my local shop sells H335. I'll pick some up next time I'm there and give it a try.

    Thanks. :)
     
  17. mseric

    mseric New Member

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    I must say, that's the first time I have ever heard or read that.
    Carry on.
     
  18. ColdIron44

    ColdIron44 New Member

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    I guess "meter" is probably the wrong word. I use Hornady's scale and electronic powder dispenser and its a bit finicky to say the least. As you approach the target weight the trickler slows down to a crawl until target weight is reached. The only issue is that the trickler's motor is a bit "jerky" so it oftentimes overthrows ball powders and longer extrusions. Shorter cut extrusions seem to trickle just fine.
     
  19. texaswoodworker

    texaswoodworker New Member

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    I tested some loads, and found one I liked. My gun didn't seem to like 24grs of 4320 for some reason. It cycled fine, but the grouping was a little bigger than I'd like. It like 25grs ok, but the grouping was still a little off. I tried 25.5grs, and it loved it. The groping was great even with me rushing it a bit (it started raining). It was probably just under MOA (two rounds in one hole, The other a flyer. :()

    I'm happy with it, so now I just have to adjust the scope a bit and I'm good to go. :D

    Thanks for the help everyone. :)
     
  20. gunnut07

    gunnut07 New Member

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    All RCBS and Hornady bottle neck rifle dies have a roll crimp built in.