need advice

Discussion in 'General Shotgun Discussion' started by machinist, Feb 16, 2009.

  1. machinist

    machinist New Member

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    I am going for my hunting license this summer and was wondering what kind of shotgun I should buy. I am a small framed female, so I would like a youth 12 gauge but dont know if one is available. Please help me.
     
  2. Minionsram

    Minionsram New Member

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    If at all possible, find someone in your area that shoots the same type shotgun you are thinking about, that way you can see if the recoil is more to your likening.

    Here is the best list I could find that has all the youth model rifles and shotguns. find one on the list and go from there.

    Youth Size guns, guns for kids by manufacture
     

  3. rugermike

    rugermike New Member

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    12 or 20ga?

    Depends alot on what type of shooting you plan on doing, have you had any experience with a 12ga or anyother shotgun in the past? I would suggest starting out with a youth model as mentioned above in a 20ga. Main thing is make sure it fits you. Depending on your budget Remington 870 Jr. Wingmaster is really hard to beat in a pump action. But again it depends on your wants and needs. I help a lot of people get started in the shooting and hunting sport. If you have other questions don't hesitate to ask. Perhaps I can help?

    mikem@tls.net
     
  4. Shotgun Shooter

    Shotgun Shooter New Member

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    How tall are you?
    If you're short, I'd recommend getting a mossberg 505 [its a youth M500 model] .410.
    Kick is easily handled and you can get big rounds for it.

    S.S.
     
  5. hunter Joe

    hunter Joe New Member

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    Years ago I won a Mossberg 500, 20 ga. in a gun raffle. I sold it to my buddy's 12 year old son Mitch for the price of the ticket, ($10). My buddy bought Mitch a riffled slug barrel for the firearm and Mitch is still killing whitetails with that firearm 10 years later. Mitch shoots at least one whitetail every year and last year he took one out to 175 yards. Do not ever underestimate a 20 ga. shot gun in capable hands. Shoot Straight, Be Safe. HUNTER JOE

    P.S. To find if the firearm fits you properly, check the "length of pull". To do this: put the butt of the stock in the crook at your elbow and your finger should be able to touch the trigger enough to pull it.
     
    Last edited: Feb 17, 2009
  6. machinist

    machinist New Member

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    how come the mossberg 9200 Crown is the only one that is listed in a 12 gauge. Does Remington or Browning make a youth 12?
     
  7. Shotgun Shooter

    Shotgun Shooter New Member

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    I dont believe Remington makes a youth. I've checked numerous places, even remington website, and it does not say anything about youths.

    It'd be helpful if the OP gave us more detail on what the use was for, budget etc etc.

    S.S.
     
    Last edited: Feb 17, 2009
  8. machinist

    machinist New Member

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    I am going to use it for ducks, geese. I dont really have a set price range, I just want to know what is out their.
     
  9. Virginian

    Virginian Active Member

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    I would advise getting a gas semi auto because of the ability to mitigate the recoil from the heavy rounds normally used in waterfowl hunting. I would look at a used Remington Model 1100 Magnum or 11-87 with a 26" barrel with choke tubes. While Remington does not make a "youth" model in 12 gauge, there are several youth sized aftermarket stocks available. (In fact I have a set I need to sell myself, that I bought for my stepson before he decided he wanted a youth LT20)
    Whenever someone is starting out, the odds are even at best that they will want to stick with whatever gun they start out with long term. If they get a good used gun and take reasonable care of it, their monetary risk is minimized because they can likely recoup almost all they have in it if they decide to sell it. The 1100/11-87 platform is enormously popular, with more aftermarket support than anything else on the planet, and they work extremely well, too. An 1100 was not my first gun, but I have had one for 45 years now and it and a couple of it's siblings have killed a few ducks and geese. Good luck.
     
  10. machinist

    machinist New Member

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    thank you for your help, it is greatly appriciated.
     
  11. biff44

    biff44 New Member

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    What are you going to be hunting? Are you ever going to shoot trap at a range?

    It is pretty important for bird hunting and trap to get the stock to be just the right length for your arms and frame. Go to a reputable gun shop and have them show you something. You might need to go with a stock that is adjustable with shims for length, and has some recoil padding. Hunting shot shells have a lot of kick to them! A light (youth) gun will not help with the recoil.