Nautical oddity.

Discussion in 'History' started by Rex in OTZ, Dec 17, 2016.

  1. Rex in OTZ

    Rex in OTZ Well-Known Member

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    I came across this photo.
    Just what the heck is going on here?
    What nation?
    What time frame?
     

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    Last edited: Dec 17, 2016
  2. SSGN_Doc

    SSGN_Doc Well-Known Member

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    May just be my phone, by I dong see a picture, so I got nothing.
     

  3. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    That is a picture of a polar bear standing on an iceberg during heavy fog.


    :p



    NO PITCHER, Bro!
     
  4. Chainfire

    Chainfire Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I dong see one either.
     
  5. MisterMcCool

    MisterMcCool Well-Known Member Supporter

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  6. Rex in OTZ

    Rex in OTZ Well-Known Member

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    Sorry guys, I ended up having to change the attachment key to jpeg.
     
  7. mbschne

    mbschne New Member

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    U.S. Destroyer DD-374
    Laid down by Norfolk Navy Yard August 15 1934.
    Launched February 26 1936 and commissioned July 23 1936.
    Fate Struck mine off Espiritu Santo and sank August 4 1942.

    http://www.navsource.org/archives/05/374.htm
     
  8. therewolf

    therewolf New Member

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    And from the looks of it, using sails for propulsion.

    Possibly an economy mode, for staying underway,

    or for a quiet sub search. Maybe as a method to move the ship

    during an engineering maintenance phase, or breakdown.
     
  9. Rex in OTZ

    Rex in OTZ Well-Known Member

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    Yes you fellows were quick. :D

    USS Tucker (DD-374) with canvas hung from her masts, during the later 1930s. This is probably an experiment in using makeshift sails to extend the ship's low speed cruising range.

    USS Tucker (DD-374) "jackknifed" amidships and under tow toward the northwest corner of Malo Island at about 0315 Hrs. GCT on 4 August 1942. USS Tucker sunk at Bruat channel on 5 August 1942. The minefield into which she had steamed had been laid by United States forces only the day before, on 2 August, and its existence had not yet been radioed to Tucker and Nira Luckenbach. Thus, Tucker's commanding officer and her crew had no idea of the dangerous waters into which they had steamed. The destroyer's only casualties were three men killed in the initial explosion and three more listed as "missing." Her name was struck from the Navy list on 2 December 1944.
    She is being towed by a motor launch from the Naval Air Station, Segond Channel, Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides, in a final attempt to beach her before she sank. USS Breese (DM-18) is standing by, in the foreground. Tucker had struck a mine in the area at about 2145 Hrs. GCT on 3 August 1942, breaking her keel. She sank on 4 August. Photographed from a plane based on USS Curtiss (AV-4). U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

    On 7 December 1941, the USS Tucker was at berth X-8, East Loch, Pearl Harbor, undergoing the tender overhaul when the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor. Lt Commander (later Admiral) William R. Terrell, was now the skipper of theTucker. He had graduated from the US Naval Academy in 1921.

    At 0755 Walter E. Bowe, G.M.2c, USN, spotted the incoming planes and immediately manned the after 50 calibre machine guns of USS Tucker. At 0757 the quartermaster on watch (Robert Burns, Sea.1c, USN) who was on the bridge, sounded the general alarm. Before the general alarm started ringing Bowe was firing one of the after machine guns. Lt Commander Terrell stated: "It is believed from numerous reports and comments by personnel of this and other ships that Bowe fired the first shot fired by the American Forces in Pearl Harbor".

    The entire crew with the exception of about three men and four officers were on board. Under the command of the Executive Officer, Lieutenant W.H. Watson, USN, who was the senior officer on board, the ship's entire battery of guns was manned. As the Tucker was alongside the tender, USS Whitney, the five inch No 3 gun could not be fired. However all other guns and 50 calibre machine guns were manned and fired at the attacking planes during all attacks.

    Ensign Lee D. Goolsby, USN, was Gunnery Officer. There were no losses to the personnel nor damage to material of the ship. Lt Commander Terrell reported that it was believed that the Tucker shot down three or four Japanese planes. HE reported that Bowe was responsible for one and possibly two of the planes shot down.
    Walter E. Bowe, G.M.2c, USN Bowe fired the first shot fired by the American Forces in Pearl Harbor".
    http://www.michaelmcfadyenscuba.info/viewpage.php?page_id=37
     

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    Last edited: Dec 17, 2016
  10. Rex in OTZ

    Rex in OTZ Well-Known Member

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    Here is a new item that is definately a floating whats-it.
     

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  11. Mosin

    Mosin Well-Known Member

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    They're using sails for propulsion...
    We're starting to move back towards that, especially when the price of fuel goes up.
    You can push the limits of a Diesel engine in terms of fuel consumption only so much, but throw on a sail and see an instant 30% gain in fuel economy...
    Of course, when the weather is cooperating.
     
  12. Rex in OTZ

    Rex in OTZ Well-Known Member

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    Funny how a new billion dollar destroyer looks like some old 1870's vessel.

    At least the 19th century guns didnt fire $800k per shot.
    According to Defense News, the LRLAP round costs*$800,000—or more—each, making the rounds prohibitively expensive.

    The ships that need sails and masts are the rather spendy but supremely immobile littoral dock queen combat ship*(LCS)*

    http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&sour...GdfT7DOq3F2nNa7FA&sig2=Kx2ULxKJDFOWB1o_mgcRhA

    http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&sour...NTV9fN3MlUalOoLaA&sig2=518ZXSgw9X6X3rQqzpvP8Q

    http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&sour...6iHiEQUzgB41Htm1g&sig2=CiQffPMyUHjpaGbrfe9Dqg
     

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    Last edited: Dec 29, 2016
  13. microadventure

    microadventure Active Member

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    to see sails on a motor vessel done right, google Dutch Motor Sailer. sensible, practical, function fist and form a distant second.
     
  14. Rex in OTZ

    Rex in OTZ Well-Known Member

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    There is a odd British story to the submarine in this photo.
     

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  15. Rex in OTZ

    Rex in OTZ Well-Known Member

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    I see nobody has taken the bait on Post 10.
    It was used during WW1.
    Study the photo for key Id points.
    The track is complete as it was fielded.
    Those brackets on the visible side, as well as the Starboard side that were the main function of this War Conveyance. . . . . . . .

    GRILLO climbing motor torpedo boats (1918
    http://www.navypedia.org/ships/italy/it_cf_grillo.htm
     

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    Last edited: Dec 22, 2016
  16. Chainfire

    Chainfire Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I was on a Destroyer Escort when I was in the Navy. What our job was was to absorb torpedoes and missles meant for carriers. The ultimate in expendable ship and crew.
     
  17. Rex in OTZ

    Rex in OTZ Well-Known Member

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    Thats right up there with the Imperial German Navy U-28 supposedly being sunk by a truck.
    After torpedoing a British steamer (Olive Branch) full of munitions bound for Russia , Dead in the water freighter was shelled by the submarines deck gun resulting explosion sending its deck cargo up into the air.
    And this case a truck that tumbled back down on top the U-28.

    http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&sour...pTSRmkTmOKvcU080Q&sig2=-sGYiuwLJKpXAUIbLyVisg

    http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&sour...3J7iaLGOE0AesGVpA&sig2=mV1q6qI-5adbM-iCr5y-bQ

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/SM_U-28_(Germany)
     
  18. AZdave

    AZdave Active Member

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    It reminded me of an oil skimmer we had when I was in the Navy 70's.

    Grillo in Italian means cricket (fancy,...).
     
  19. Rex in OTZ

    Rex in OTZ Well-Known Member

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    A very interesting boat in the Italian Naval service during World War One. Part tractor, part torpedo boat, it was designed to crawl over the nets protecting enemy naval bases, then punch holes in the bad guys ships, sending them to the bottom and taking them out of the war.

    For most of 1915, 1916, and 1917 the Italian Navy, (Regia Marina) was content with holding the line across the Adriatic and keeping the Austrians in their ports. Then in 1918, they decided to go north and sink the Kaiser’s battleships where they slept. Two Italian torpedo boats made it into the lightly defended harbor at Trieste and sank the old battleship Wien. The problem was, the Austrians had years to fortify their largest naval base at Pola (now Pula in Croatia) with anti-submarine nets, anti-torpedo nets, underwater obstacles, coastal artillery, and naval mines. To penetrate these harbors, the Italians had to come up with something different. They came up with the “Barchino saltatore” or “punt jumper”. These fifty foot long wooden hulled boats had a flat bottom and two tracks along each side of the hull, port and starboard. Each track held a series of metal crampon hooks and was turned by a set of pulleys fore and aft, propelled by a pair of 5hp electric motors. This unusual boat 8-ton could literally crawl over the rows of torpedo nets and anti-submarine nets that separated the Adriatic from the protected harbor. Once over the nets, the boat would drop into the inner harbor, where it would transit, using its spinning tracks to move like a side-mounted paddle wheel, at 4-knots. Then, lining up with an Austrian battleship at anchor, it would send two torpedoes into its side before beating feet (err, tracks) back out to sea. Of course this required the punt jumper to be towed to Pola and back by a larger ship, but once there, it was good to go.

    http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&sour...V7RlTt1CZUsHqwF5Q&sig2=UA5QbMjaeMxMppvoXqRzBQ

    https://laststandonzombieisland.com/tag/grillo/
     

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