Mystery Musket

Discussion in 'Blackpowder & Musket' started by bratry, Apr 4, 2010.

  1. bratry

    bratry New Member

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    Hi all. I have an identification issue I hope someone can help me with. I recently acquired a blackpowder flintlock musket. To me it doesn't appear to be authentic due to its low quality appearance. It is however quite interesting and looks old. The barrel is pitted and oxidized and so is the brass on the gun. There are no identifying numbers or words that I can find anywhere on the gun. There are however two identifying marks. One mark is on top of the barrel and the other is on the side by the hammer. The mark appears to be a dog or fox sitting on its haunches with four or five dots in a row under it. The whole symbol is enclosed within a circle. The stock has a buffalo hand carved in it. The barrel is attached to the forestock with tightly wrapped bands of sinue. (spelling??) I suspect it is a kit that someone put together at some point. I appreciate any help.
     
    Last edited: Apr 4, 2010
  2. doctherock

    doctherock New Member

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    You might want to go to the Introductions and tell us about yourself. Then take some pictures so we can see what you have and see the markings. That would be a great start.
     

  3. Hawg

    Hawg New Member

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    Last edited: Apr 5, 2010
  4. bratry

    bratry New Member

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    Dang. Sounds like you may have hit it right on the head HAWG. I will check out the link you put up. Thanks a lot.
     
  5. bratry

    bratry New Member

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    I checked out the site and the company logo looks a little different and the guns they offer seem of better quality. I'm wondering if maybe someone bought some parts from them and carved their own stock for it? I will try to put up some pics.
     
  6. Hawg

    Hawg New Member

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    It could be an original that's gone thru hell and high water. How bout some pics?
     
  7. bratry

    bratry New Member

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    These are the photos that I took of my mystery musket. Notice that the fox logo has five dots under it. The logo from the Sitting Fox website didn't have these dots. Any further thoughts?
     

    Attached Files:

  8. Hawg

    Hawg New Member

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    What you have is an original northwest trade gun. It should have a sea serpent as a sideplate.
     
  9. bratry

    bratry New Member

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    I sent these photos to a contact at Sitting Fox and he doesn't seem to think it's authentic. Any more thoughts or info? Thanks Hawg.
     
  10. Hawg

    Hawg New Member

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    No, he could be right but I am curious as to why he thinks that.
     
  11. bratry

    bratry New Member

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    The gun seems to be missing the serpent sideplate. He thought that the shotgun style barrel with the bead at the end didn't seem right. He also said that it is easy to get a fox stamp to put on the barrels but the only markings on the gun are the foxes so I'm not so sure someone put those on there. He thought maybe someone had built if from spare parts? He sent me link to another web site North Star West, Inc | Manufacturer of Historically Correct Reproductions of 18th and 19th Century Smooth Bore muzzleloading guns. a company that makes authentic reproduction trade guns. The guns they produce look very similar but still with small differences. I sent the same pictures in an email to them to get some insight.
     
  12. CA357

    CA357 New Member Supporter

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    Very interesting. Good luck with your quest.
     
  13. bratry

    bratry New Member

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    Thank you everyone for your input. The mystery seems to be solved. I heard back from the owner of North Star West Inc. he identified the gun as one of the companys very early productions from the early 1980's. He believes that past owners made the gun by hand with parts purchased from them. After having inspected the gun and viewed their website I believe he is most likely correct. It has been a fascinating and informative investigation. Regardless of it's origin I love it.
     
  14. CA357

    CA357 New Member Supporter

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    Excellent! Mystery solved. :cool:
     
  15. Hawg

    Hawg New Member

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    Cool, now you know.
     
  16. Portugal

    Portugal New Member

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    Hi All,

    I'm from Portugal, and I have a Westley Richards "Monkey Tail", a caplock musket from 1867. But I have a problem: There's a piece that is broken, some kind of little tube (I think it was a tube where the soldiers put the gunpowder, I'm sorry, I don't know the name of it). I have an image of the tube, but not the broken one (below).

    The little piece is broken, therefore, when the hammer goes down after I pull the trigger, it doesn't hit the broken part, because that little tube that was supposed to be there isn't.

    So, my questions are: Is that piece replaceable? Where can I buy it online, ordering it from the US? Is it expensive?

    Thank you.
     
  17. Portugal

    Portugal New Member

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    Sorry, here's the image of the little tube that's broken in my rifle:
     

    Attached Files:

  18. bratry

    bratry New Member

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    Hey Portugal

    I'm no gun expert but I do own and hunt with a percussion cap style muzzle loader and the piece your asking about is called a 'nipple'. The percussion cap that ignites the powder in the barrel goes on top of that. The hammer slams down on that cap and ignites the cap. Around here you can buy a replacemnt percussion nipple at almost any place that sells guns for just a few dollars. Based on your picture it looks like a standard number 11 style nipple. You should be able to buy that piece at Cabelas.com or any other hunting supply site.
     
    Last edited: Apr 14, 2010
  19. bratry

    bratry New Member

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    And also, they are just threaded in the gun. You should be able to just untwist it with a small wrench.
     
  20. Hawg

    Hawg New Member

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    You will need to know thread size. Once you get the broken one out and it may require a little heat if it's seized in place you can take it to a hardware store and they can most likely tell you the thread size.