Mysterious phenomenon --cartridges expanded in size?

Discussion in 'General Handgun Discussion' started by Buckaroo, Aug 27, 2010.

  1. Buckaroo

    Buckaroo New Member

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    I recently found a 50-count box of .22 caliber, long rifle, 40 grams, lead, Lubaloy coated cartridges by Winchester in my dresser drawer. They are probably 10 years old. I tried to insert them into the cylinder of my old S&W revolver (a heavy "K" .22, I think).

    To my surprise -- they didn't "fit" into the cylinder. The casings seemed to have actually expanded in diameter. I tried to a bit of gun oil on them, but to avail. I could probably pound them in, but that might be a big no-no.

    Anyway, has anyone on here ever experienced or heard of such a bizarre thing?

    And how does one dispose of unwanted bullets? Take them to a cooperating gun store for disposal? Take them to the police department? Bury them in the back yard? I don't want to throw them out with the garbage, as they might explode in the landfill.

    Thanks in advance for any answers, comments or suggestions.

    A newby
     
  2. robocop10mm

    robocop10mm Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    I do not think the case could "expand" with age. The bullet could, however, as the lead can oxidize and "grow". Compare one with a micrometer or good caliper to a modern/fresh round to see where the discrepancy is.
     

  3. Shihan

    Shihan Active Member Lifetime Supporter

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  4. canebrake

    canebrake New Member

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    The .22 is a heeled bullet. The internal diameter of the barrel is the same diameter as the cartridge case and bullet.

    This makes measuring the cartridge easy. Is the bullet the same size as the brass?

    Does the cartridge hang up in the cylinder at the beginning or after the bullet is inserted and the brass starts to go in?

    Two suggestions;

    1. Clean the cylinder with a chamber brush,
    2. Or, find a well used rimfire with a worn chamber.

    Or you can do what G37 suggested and forget the $3.00.
     
  5. danf_fl

    danf_fl Retired Supporter

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    Don't try to dismantle .22lr bullets. Should the primer compound in the rim get activated by using any tools, could be a trip to the ER.
     
  6. MB44

    MB44 New Member

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    With all due respect, isn't this "Much Ado About Nothing"...??

    I'd say toss them and get another box, unless you like me live in Brazil and a box of .22LR hurts you for 20 USD for a box of 50. I figure a lot of things could have happened to them over time,....

    Ahh and also, don't we owe Buckaroo the good ole' "Go the the introduction forum and introduce yourself" speech,....:D
     
  7. danf_fl

    danf_fl Retired Supporter

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    I think you just did. Good catch.
     
  8. IGETEVEN

    IGETEVEN New Member

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    Think about the possibility of maybe your gun got smaller? :confused: :eek:
     
  9. orangello

    orangello New Member

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    Cold water and shrinkage, the bane of many a skinnydipper.
     
  10. danf_fl

    danf_fl Retired Supporter

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    Some muscles will reduce in size if not used regularly.
     
  11. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    And for the obvious- You are CERTAIN that the suspect rounds are not .22 magnum?:confused:
     
  12. utf59

    utf59 New Member

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    And the other obvious: did you try the rounds in another gun?
     
  13. crazycharlie2

    crazycharlie2 New Member

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    I fail to see where you're coming from or what it has to do with the subject.
     
  14. utf59

    utf59 New Member

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    It was a joke. When someone posts a complete, definitive answer, he is often referred to as a "thread killer." Shihan was referring to that.
     
  15. Win73

    Win73 Member

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    Ditto checking to be sure they are not .22 magnum. The .22 magnum has a larger diameter case than the LR.