My new Mosin Nagant was new in 1900

Discussion in 'General Rifle Discussion' started by jebsca, Oct 15, 2012.

  1. jebsca

    jebsca New Member

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    I had been reading up on the mosin nagant 91/30s and went looking for something from just before World War II, say about 1939. I was looking forward to digging around and picking one out at the big gun show in our area. What I did not expect to do was look around and find three m1891s. I am more of a long rifle guy, and they stole the show for me. As I looked them over, the one that demanded my attention was from 1900. She was in good shape for being 112 years old. I looked her over for a bit before the salesman came over. I found out fast that I may have read up a bit on the rifles, and knew a small bit, but I was way out of my league trying to make my first milsurp buy. I had no idea what a forced match was, or what any of the stamps meant or would add (or subtract) to the value. In the end, I knew that I would have to take her home and make her mine.

    It has been two days since I got her home, but I still have not stripper her down very far. I have pulled out the cleaning rod and taken the bolt out and taken the bolt apart some of the way. That has been enough to see that I will have finish cleaning the cosmoline off and out.

    I got her with the idea of shooting her, but have a few questions still. As she is over 100 years old, but spent much time in long term storage, should I worry about running just any ammo in her, or should I look for something loaded a little light? I know that I should run a set of go no-go gauges in before I send round down range, and lots of cleaning before anything else, but is that it? I know I need to break it down to every little piece to clean, but that seems so wrong with something that has so much history.

    I will try to get some pics up soon. As it turns out, my wife can’t find the charger for her good camera, and I am having a hard time getting some good pics with my 9 year old camera.
     
  2. JWagner

    JWagner New Member

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    Any gun that old will have metallurgy inferior to newer guns. Even the '03 US Army rifles with low serial numbers are considered questionable for safe shooting. I suspect that the Russian guns are no different. A light load would be a good idea.
     

  3. potentialglock

    potentialglock New Member

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    I have a 91/30 and while I havnt shot it yet it still needs to be completely broken down for cleaning. I had mine cleaned and back together in two days. Personally I enjoyed the process. And while it is a historical rifle its by no means so valuable you shouldn't mess with it. Unless your mosin is special somehow I wouldn't worry about historical value. Now I have a question for y'all. I ran some dummy rounds through it and its a 50/50 chance that they'll chamber easily or sometimes I have to give the bolt handle a good smack downward to completely chamber the round. Is this normal?
     
  4. JWagner

    JWagner New Member

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    The ornery bolt on a 91/30 is considered a feature and not a flaw. It is fairly normal.
     
  5. jebsca

    jebsca New Member

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    Took my M1891 out today. I was shooting about 200 yards, without bayonet (do not have one yet). It shot ok, but from what I have read, it should be better when I put the bayonet on. I was only planning on 10 or 15 rounds, but in the end, I used all 30 rounds that I had with me. This rifle is way to much fun.
     
  6. Jpyle

    Jpyle New Member

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    It's normal to a point...what I mean is, most Mosins will have a heavy bolt...if it feels like you need a 2x4 to smack it loose the chamber may need a good cleaning. Sometimes the residual cosmoline that gets left in the bolt melts into a sticky varnish-like substance that coats the chamber...this coating gets tacky with heat and causes excessive "sticky bolt syndrome."

    http://7.62x54r.net/MosinID/MosinCleaning.htm#Sticky
     
  7. Chainfire

    Chainfire Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Congrats on your purchase. You bought an outstanding historical artifact. That one probably fought in the Russian revolution and both world wars. It is probably also a safe and reliable shooter.

    In the years I have been around Mosins, I have only seen one failure of the metal; that in a cracked receiver. That one was all over the web a year or two ago. Who knows why that one broke; it may have been due to some creative reloading. These guns are tough as nails, and were over-built. I have some older than 1900, and have never been the least bit aprehensive about shooting one.

    Have the headspace checked. Either buy the gauges or have a smith do it for you. If that is acceptable, the gun will be fine. Of course, when you take it down, it never hurts to go over the whole thing with a fine tooth comb. (or a lighted magnifier)

    Good luck and good shooting!
     
  8. -06

    -06 New Member

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    Love my mosins. Think I have three that I have not fired yet-or cleaned. Rotator cuff has my shoulder sore so am afraid to bruise it more. Did fire an 8mm Mauser a couple weeks ago--and wished I had not. Nagants are hard to beat especially when you load your own rounds. It cuts down on the "fireball" and noise a bit. Makes a lot of difference. I like the light ball better but it still produces a lot of smoke/noise. Will be trying the drilling out of Berdan primers and inserting Boxers soon. Have a good bit of Berdan brass cases that hopefully will work.
     
  9. Rick1967

    Rick1967 Well-Known Member

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    Good luck with that. Berdan primers are larger than boxer primers. I have deprimed berdans. But the holes were too big for the boxers.
     
  10. -06

    -06 New Member

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    There is a video of "changing them". You drill through the fired primer to center a flash hole in the existing anvil then use a larger drill to cut out the center of the Berdan primer leaving the walls. The Boxer supposed to fit properly within the Berdan's walls. Have not tried it yet but the video says it works fine. Knew there had to be a way to save all that good brass--lol.
     
  11. Old_Crow

    Old_Crow New Member

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    I have a 1930 Mosin Nagant 91/30. After I cleaned it up there was still a layer of cosmoline that was like dirt. I ended up using fine steel wool all over the outside of the metal parts of the gun to restore the original finish. My gun appears to have been unissued. It was the ugliest gun in the box yet the action was smooth as silk and the trigger was very nice. After several cleanings the bore now looks as good as a new rifle. At 80 yards the mosin is just as accurate as my Marlin 60 with open sights. At 80 yards wind is a great equalizer. I have shot stumps at the lake at unknown distances. When shooting across water the yards add up fast. A friend took his 300 magnum to the same spot. It has a scope with a mildot setup. He estimated the stumps to be around 600 yards away.

    If you take care of your mosin and clean it up well your mosin will do the same thing. I use Brown Bear 203 gr soft point ammo. Surplus ammo is ok for plinking but for hunting you need to invest in quality ammo.
     
  12. HM2Grunt

    HM2Grunt New Member

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    It is too bad that Soviet Berdan primers are too large. If a source of those primers could be found, you could use those brass cases very easily. I hate to toss good brass cases after using them one time. Had a bunch of brass 8mm Mauser Berdan cases, and thought about drilling out the anvil. This was too time consuming and the primer pocket seemed deeper than the Boxer. Bought a Berdan de-primer, and found Berdan primers from Graf's, and now I reload the 8mm. Loading the Berdan is easy, and after the primer part, not different from loading Boxers I heard that some countries that use the 7.62mmx54r ,use smaller primers, and therefore these cases might be reloadable. I think that China may be one. Has anybody seen any rounds with the smaller Berdan primers. I don't think that there is much of a market for the larger Berdan primers with the abundance of cheap, steel-cased, 7.62mm ammo now. So I don't see Tula making any larger Berdan primers soon, but again, has anyone encountered a source of the larger Berdan primers?
     
  13. jebsca

    jebsca New Member

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    When to the Tulsa show this weekend. I noticed many fun new toys to add, but in the end, I added another Mosin Nagant to the safe. This second one is a 1930 91/30. Looks to me like it is laminated stock, maching numbers, hex reciever, that is is good shape, with an accessory kit (something that didn't happen with my first). I took a pic of the two of them together. The 1891 is in the back, and somehow looks a bit shorter than the 91/30. This is not a very good pic, but something to look at. I will have to try to have better pics after I get this second rifle cleaned up. Also, thanks for the help so far.
     

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  14. Jpyle

    Jpyle New Member

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    Pull the buttplate off of the new rifle, it will show whether its a laminate or not but I don't think laminated stocks were common on the pre-war rifles. Regarding the 1891, it may be a converted Dragoon M1891...Hard to tell exactly from the pictures but the front sight and rear sight should be noticeably different. Google Mosin Nagant Dragoon, you should find lots of info.
     
  15. HM2Grunt

    HM2Grunt New Member

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    Friend of mine has the same sweet tooth as you at gun shows. He has bought better than thirty Mosins. He bought so many in one week, that I think the Feds may have visited him. He seems to think that the same thing that happened with .303 Enfields, will happen with Mosins, and the price go up. I don't think it will happen, just because of the numbers of Mosins that have entered the country. Talked him into buying gun safes for his hoard in case J. Edgar visits again. Hope he is right about the price going up, he says that I am in "the will".
     
  16. HM2Grunt

    HM2Grunt New Member

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    Can possibly have a laminated stock if it was refurbished after the war. I have found two kinds of laminated stocks, one on a round receiver, and one I bought and found it was inletted to fit the No. one Hexagonal-style receiver. Is there a refurb cartouche on your stock? I agree that a laminated stock would not be original equipment for a hex receiver. I think they are strictly post-war. Maybe it's a prototype? I don't know.
     
  17. batjka

    batjka New Member

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    You have nothing to worry about. People, myself including, shoot antique Mosins with full military loads all the time with no ill effects. Mine is an M-39 on a 1898 receiver. Good enough for Talvisota, good enough for me.
     
  18. -06

    -06 New Member

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    HM2, having safes will not deter the alphabet boys from getting at them. Having his "hoard" under lock and key may be their concern. Why would he be recording C&R purchases--especially in large numbers? Just inviting problems.
     
  19. HM2Grunt

    HM2Grunt New Member

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    Unless you feel that you want to, you don't need to put a bayonet on your rifle. If the rifle doesn't shoot where you want it to, the sights up front can be moved. If the rifle shoots too high, lower your point of aim or put a taller front sight on. Unless you feel that you want to use a bayonet for some reason. The bayonet adds some to an already long rifle. If you aren't careful,"you'll put somebody's eye out".