My girlfriend and her "Baby"

Discussion in 'Semi-Auto Handguns' started by EiteCombat, Mar 9, 2010.

  1. EiteCombat

    EiteCombat New Member

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    Hey guys. I was just looking for some shooting advice for my girlfriend.

    To begin my story, the last gunshow we were at she tried out the feel of some firearms including Glocks, XD's and Taurus. Shortly after her hand rested on a Jericho 941 R Baby Eagle .40 S&W (steel frame). She loved the comfort and grip and the weight didn't bother her. She fell in love and I was out another $500.:D Which actually seems to be a very good deal.

    Anyways, she plans on using this gun as a ccw when she receives her license. So we went to the range and I gave her some basic advice on stance and grip and let her shoot. (She's a fairly new shooter.) The first few clips she was able to consistantly place her shots a little low and to the right, which makes me think she is just flinching upon trigger pull. However, the next few clips weren't so good. She barely hit the paper at only 7 yards. I was watching her control and it doesn't seem to be too bad, She's not wildly waving the pistol when she shoots and she seems to maintain decent control of the recoil. (Though it seems a .40 might have been a little too fiesty for a new shooter.) She put 100 rounds through it that day.

    At the time though there were a few other people at the range shooting as well as me with my 1911 which is far from quiet. So I'm also wondering if the shots in the background are messing with her nerves a bit. She says she feels pretty comfortable though.

    So I was wondering if you guys had any advice that I can give her besides the ole "practice makes perfect" and "don't anticipate the recoil" saying. I figured it might help getting some insight from you "seasoned :p" veterans.

    BTW. We are going to the range again on Wednesday so we're hoping to see a bit of improvement.

    BTW 2. I put a few rounds through the gun myself. Great pistol. Never a hiccup and it does feel pretty good in your hand. (Never better then my 1911 though) Recoil and trigger pull seem pretty smooth as well.

    Your 2 cents is appreciated.
     
  2. NGIB

    NGIB New Member

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    A .40, even in a steel frame is a tough gun to start with. The recoil impulse is very snappy as opposed to the "push" of a .45 - flinching and muzzle rise are 2 real problems here. If your range rents a .22, use it to teach the fundamentals and then move these skills to the baby eagle. I had one myself (in .45) and they're a good gun - she just needs practice...
     

  3. suprdave

    suprdave New Member

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    She's tightening her grip as she pulls the trigger. NGIB nailed it with teaching her the basics with a .22
     
  4. Missileman

    Missileman New Member

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    Suprdave is probably right on--you can test this by having her hold the gun lightly in her shooting hand, and use her support hand to tightly grip around the shooting hand, providing most of the support--also make sure she is using the end of her finger on the trigger, and not over-reaching with hertrigger finger. If she hits OK now then she was probably gripping the gun to tightly. Good luck.
     
  5. Glasshartt

    Glasshartt New Member

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    One of the things to try is to load her magazines for her and put in a snap-cap. You will know it is there, but she won't. Watch for her to get to it and see if she pulls the weapon.
     
  6. EiteCombat

    EiteCombat New Member

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    The .22 and snap cap ideas are great ideas. The range we're going to is an open one so there is no rental of any kind. So I might try the snap-cap idea and see what she does. Boy will she be confused for a minute. lol
     
  7. Mark F

    Mark F New Member Supporter

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    Have her BENCH-REST shoot for awhile, at least 2 or 3 sessions. This will get her used to the pistol, and she will begin hitting small targets quite easily. Then let her free-hand...
     
  8. utf59

    utf59 New Member

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    I would add that she may have been getting "shooting tired." New to shooting, shooting a .40, etc., makes the arms tired. That means the recoil feels a bit worse. And that makes the flinching from anticipating the recoil worse.

    It might be worth investing in a .22. Even for experienced shooters, it's a cheap way to get in a lot of trigger time. I always take a .22 to the range with me. I shoot at least as many rounds with it during a session as I do with whatever other gun(s) I bring.
     
  9. Jess

    Jess New Member

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    I don't know you, so i'm going to make sweeping generalizations, but I do see lots of posted by very well intending dads/boyfriends/husbands/etc. There is a common thread among them that since you love the woman in your life you are the best person to teach her shooting. This is not always the case. Choosing to own, shoot, and especially carry a gun is a very big decision, it can come with lots of emotions that are very different than a man would ever feel. To then have one of the men in your life influencing your technique, decisions regarding shooting, etc is sometimes overwhelming. But you men are being sweet and sharing something you love, so women tend to not say anything. I think this turns lots of women off from shooting (at least a lot of the women I talk to) Giving your woman the tools to research, train, and be sucessful on her own is priceless. Standing behind her suggesting how she grip her pistol...not so much. It can also be very intense to be the "new shooter" at a range with one on one focus on you.

    All that being said my advice is to ASK her how she would like to become comfortable shooting.

    a .22 rifle can't be beat for basics and fun cheap shooting, and a grip ball for strength.
     
  10. IGETEVEN

    IGETEVEN New Member

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    The other suggestions of grip related to trigger issues and starting with a .22 initially seem to be spot-on, IMHO.

    Jess is "quoted for truth" here. More importantly, be patient and DO NOT RUSH HER! Let here learn and shoot at her own pace and comfort level. ;)

    There is no hurry to get Bonnie up to Clyde's expected shooting abilities. :)

    Jack
     
  11. Missileman

    Missileman New Member

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    Wow Jess, that's some of the best advice I've seen for awhile. Kind of like teaching your spouse to drive or to golf--it's always better to let someone else do that, at least initially. Guess it's just a guy thing--tough to look at it from the woman's perspective. Nice post!
     
  12. amoroque

    amoroque New Member

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    I think thats a great idea. never thought of that.
     
  13. EiteCombat

    EiteCombat New Member

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    Well she's not rushed or anything at all, she just wants to make sure she is ready so she can get her concealed permit. She's wanting to go to the range all the time so she can get better. We actually just got back from the range and I will be telling you the story a little later on, it's a long one, not from the shooting but from the traveling adventure.
     
  14. gorknoids

    gorknoids New Member

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    I JUST came down out of the kitchen after attempting to shame my daughter into going shooting with me this Sunday. Basically, if she goes shooting, she gets new tires for her Miata. See, guys can be nice about it!
     
  15. EiteCombat

    EiteCombat New Member

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    So we went out to the range, which is slightly off road across the West Virginia line. We figured all the snow and ice would be melted right? WRONG! We started in and ended up directly on ice facing down hill, so there was no backing up. We pressed on and eventually came to a place to turn around to try to go back up the hill, not happening. So we went down to the range to do some shooting while hoping someone would come. She did much better shooting out there, I think because she was more comfortable out there then in the indoor range. She said she felt more comfortable and overall her shots came up a bit. No one came after about 2 hours so we decided we had to walk out.

    So I had my 1911 in my back and her baby eagle in my pocket as we walked our way through the middle of the woods. I stayed armed due to the fact of seeing large animal tracks along the trail we were walking down. (Looked like bobcat or small bear, dunno if bears would be out yet.) We finally got to the road and had to walk 5 miles to a garage that would be able to tow us up the icy hill.

    All in all it was a heck of an adventure but i think we're gonna hafta stick to the indoor range at least untill the summer. All this in the name of shooting sports. Wouldn't have it any other way. :cool:
     
  16. Jpyle

    Jpyle New Member

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    Snap cap is also a good tool for teaching the proper technique for clearing a fail to fire.
     
  17. EiteCombat

    EiteCombat New Member

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    So taking your advice I've decided I need to add a .22 to my collection. Any advice on what is a good affordable .22? I've never really looked into 22's too much as I have always favored something with a bit more firepower, but this one is for her. My first handgun was a converted Remington 1861?? I think, reproduction. It was converted to .45 long colt. That thing packed a punch but since then I have gone large caliber and never looked back.

    Any opinions on the Walther P22? or anything else for that matter would be helpful. Thanks
     
  18. utf59

    utf59 New Member

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    If you're going low price, S&W has a model that's inexpensive and fun to shoot. Rugers cost a bit more, but are more reliable and less finicky about ammo. But they are a bit of a pain to disassemble.

    If you are looking for a "trainer," something that is set up more like bigger defense pistols, look at the Walther and the Sig Mosquito. Personally, my Mosquito has been a disappointment, but a friend of mine has a newer one, and he has been very happy with it. I shot someone's Walther P22 at the range last weekend, and it was sweet! The ammo they had (American Eagle) wasn't feeding well, but the Federals I had (same company, go figure) ran through it flawlessly. I don't know how finicky they are with other brands.

    There are plenty of good .22s out there, these are just the ones that I have experience with. I'm sure you'll get a lot more good advice and find something you will both enjoy shooting.
     
  19. Force4000

    Force4000 New Member

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    I just purchased a Walther P22 about a month ago I love it!!!! Great little gun to use. I payed 200 for mine in mint condition (fired about 20 times). Its a very good gun to shoot and practice with!
     
  20. WDB

    WDB New Member

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    The best money you will ever spend will be professional instruction for someone new to firearms. If you find a good instructor they can teach the one you love in a far more objective manor than you can. I have been around firearms most my life and believed I should be able to teach those I love but I was too emotionaly invested.