My First M39 Finn

Discussion in 'Curio & Relic Discussion' started by Capybara, Oct 21, 2013.

  1. Capybara

    Capybara New Member

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    It finally arrived and so far, I am very happy with it. The build, trigger feel, sights and even the feel of the bolt is very different than any of my Russians. It looks nice and I hope it will be a good shooter.

    I like that it is a 1968 "Sneak" M39, interesting history there. Can anyone identify how old the receiver is on this rifle?

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    Last edited: Oct 21, 2013
  2. ctshooter

    ctshooter New Member

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    Nice rifle!!

    Looks to be a pre 1936 based off the hex receiver
     

  3. jpattersonnh

    jpattersonnh Active Member

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    If you remove the action, the Tang should be stamped w/ the original marks. No Sneeking, that is why it is C&R. Nice rifle!
     
  4. Capybara

    Capybara New Member

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    Yeah, I will need to tear it down for a cosmo removal party and take a peek at the tang when I have a life. I was also told to be cautious and take my time because Finns often have shims that should be marked and put back in place upon reassembly. Will report back when I get to it in a few weeks.
     
    Last edited: Oct 21, 2013
  5. sputnik1988

    sputnik1988 Active Member

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    What is 'sneeking'?
     
  6. Capybara

    Capybara New Member

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    The 1960s/70s M39s were known (in America only, from what I am told?) as "Sneaks" because they were assembled by the Finns right under the nose of the Russians with whom they had signed a treaty to not build more small arms. That is why they are called "Nones" also, notice how there is no arsenal or maker on the receiver? They were assembled from a mish mosh of whatever parts the Finns had laying about at Sako and another arsenal. Fascinating history on these rifles, supposedly they were setup for accuracy, are often shimmed from the arsenal and supposedly used for training (basic sniper? Without optics...)
     
  7. sputnik1988

    sputnik1988 Active Member

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    Cool, I may have to add one of those to my collection
     
  8. Trez

    Trez Well-Known Member

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    Im selling mine...... ;)
     
  9. sputnik1988

    sputnik1988 Active Member

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    I imagine shipping would be pretty outrageous from AZ to KY on a 9 pound rifle, maybe I'm wrong.
     
  10. Capybara

    Capybara New Member

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    Wideners only charged $16.00 to ship from Tenn to California on another rifle?
     
  11. Mercator

    Mercator Active Member

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    When was the treaty in effect? Were all small arms banned from production?
     
  12. Capybara

    Capybara New Member

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    From what I read, the treaty was signed at the end of the Continuation war with Russia. Right around the end of WWII, which is confusing since I thought the Russians were too busy fighting off the Germans? I also read that Finland was looking at what was happening with other countries like Czechoslovakia with the Russians and thought to themselves, "screw this, we are building and stocking up" but I have also beem told that the Sneaks were merely training rifles for basic sniper training. There are some books on it, written by Finns, I may read up on it to learn the real deal. Google is your friend, there are a lot of bits and pieces to the story out there.
     
  13. Mercator

    Mercator Active Member

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    Basically true, except a small arms production ban was not required by the treaty. The Finns were under pressure from the Allies who underwrote Finnish independence on the condition of neutrality. From the early 50s on the Finns developed, produced, and sold small arms. I don't know where the Sneaker story originated. It has an urban lore ring to it.
     
  14. Mercator

    Mercator Active Member

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    To clarify, I thought there may have been another treaty, but it looks like we are talking about the one signed in '47. I had a personal interest in the subject and did read some
     
  15. deathkricket

    deathkricket New Member

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    The hex reciver on the M 39's are built from captured russian recivers around 1890's (late) the Finns never produced their own recivers. Thease guns have a f ing ton of history. Here is mine. B marked Belgium (only around 10k made)made barrel 1946, resenal refinish unissued 100%. M 39's are known for their incredible accuracy so long as it has not been counter board. They are considered the best of the best rifles of their time.

    "Almost all of "Sneak M-39s" were assembled by ASEVARIKKO 1 in a town Kuopio; nowadays KUOPION ASEVARIKKO. (Finnish word "asevarikko" means "the arms depot of Finnish Army"). The stamp ASEV 1 means just the depot (not a factory) where the rifles are assembled. Receivers, barrels and breech-bolts may all bear the different serial numbers. Parts of the bolt may also be stamped with variable numbers. They were assembled from the huge pile of spare parts, but - PLEASE NOTE! - they were assembled scrupulously: Too big or too small clearance of a headspace was not allowed. Actually, the allowances of bore, chamber and action dimensions were smaller than those of original rifles M-39 made for use of average riflemen, as these "Sneak Rifles" were made for sniping. If the barrel was chopped from an old Mosin-Nagant M-1891 barrel, it's muzzle end was somewhat too thin. The front sight of rifle M-39 was fitted on it with a thin-walled bushing. Barrels, receivers and steel furnitures of these rifles are blackened to look very beautiful."

    Every thing you will ever need to know.
    http://www.mosinnagant.net/finland/finnish_mosin_nagantm39.asp
     

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    Last edited: Oct 22, 2013
  16. kfox75

    kfox75 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Nice rifle Capy. Thanks for the history lesson all. I think I have some interesting reads coming up from this thread.
     
  17. jpattersonnh

    jpattersonnh Active Member

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    The Finns did use shims, mostly at the end of the barrel, but they could be anywhere in the channel.

    The Term Sneakers is because of the production date on the receiver. I like the Czarist Izhevsk stamp on the bolt.

    The Finns were famous for shipping arms to conflict areas, not what the Soviets wanted when attempting to take over and hold eastern europe. Since Finland was independent during WWII (beat the snot out of the Soviets in the Winter War) They earned the right to stay independent even though the continuation war started as soon as Germany was defeated. The West helped them make their case.

    It has to do w/ U.S. laws and the receiver date.
     
  18. Capybara

    Capybara New Member

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    Thanks for the info deathkricket, very interesting.