My first C&R

Discussion in 'Curio & Relic Discussion' started by xring3, Oct 1, 2020.

  1. xring3

    xring3 Well-Known Member

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    605F6B0F-0C5C-4359-ACA6-B27487011EFE.jpeg Back in 1963 my dad, a neighbor and I went to Hodgdons gunshop and I bought one of these rifles. It took all of my summer lawn mowing money. I was 14 years old at the time. My dad, of course, had to sign for it. The idea was for me to clean and refinish the stock and have a nice rifle in case I wanted to go deer hunting. I stripped the grimy wood, steamed the dent out and proceeded to apply Neetsfoot oil. After about 20 coats I had a really beautiful walnut stock. Sadly I no longer have the rifle as my now ex wife sold it. BTW...I actually bought it from THE Bruce Hodgdon who makes Hodgdon powders. Nice fellow.
     
  2. Sniper03

    Sniper03 Supporting Member Supporter

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    xring

    My heart goes out to you regarding your Rifle! But how could she take it from you since you had it when you were a kid? (OH lest I forget Attorneys and a vengeful X!)
    But so sorry to hear that! I really liked your Thread here about your Dad the Gun Shop and Mowing Money for the rifle. Even stirred up great memories for me as I read it.
    But one good thing about it, great memories can not be taken from us!:)

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  3. sheriffjohn

    sheriffjohn Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Those were some great years ! Dad bought a .303 British Enfield for less than $20 mailorder. When it arrived there were several boxes of ammo (tracers) and a Weaver .22 rifle scope in the box which he did not order. He "sporterized" the Enfield as many did. After setting an old tree on fire with the tracers down in the woods he put those away. I still have a box of them 50+ years later.
     
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  4. DHall_37

    DHall_37 Member

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    Only $40 wow! I wish I was around when a lot of Mausers and Enfields were coming in at a good price. My Uncle told me back in the day he bought a Lee Enfield for $15.
     
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  5. sheriffjohn

    sheriffjohn Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Well, in the early 60's a dollar an hour was big bucks for a kid to earn - IF anyone would hire you. Grass cutting, snow shoveling. bucking bales, etc. were possible but seasonal. Traplines paid pretty good for a few. Selling "Wallace Brown" greeting cards and Clover Brand salve worked until you ran out of relatives.
     
  6. xring3

    xring3 Well-Known Member

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    BTW....it was all matching. I even remember the serial number 17422. I did spark my interest in collecting military firearms. I have since then managed to acquire 2 Belgian made Mausers in 30.06. In my original post I mentioned my neighbor. His name is George Parkhurst. He is a custom stock maker with many awards for his creations. I enjoyed watching him take a block of walnut and make a custom stock for some wealthy hunter.
     
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  7. xring3

    xring3 Well-Known Member

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    Your quote is true! I was lucky to get $1.25 for mowing a lawn. $1.00 to shovel snow (no such thing as a snowblower). I had one elderly lady that that paid me 75 cents an hour to paste wax her hardwood floors once a year. I knew, even as a kid, that was cheap but, the lady had numbers tattooed on her arm and even then I knew what she had to endure. I always wanted to ask about her experiences but, my mom said it would bring up too many bad thoughts for her. In those days kids minded their parents.
     
  8. aarondhgraham

    aarondhgraham Well-Known Member

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    My go-to was the Alden's mail order catalog,,,
    They always had 15-20 pages of guns.

    I hustled for money just like every other kid born in the early 50's,,,
    Mom and Dad were pretty generous giving me a dollar a week allowance.

    I remember the absolute joy when I started junior high school,,,
    Dad upped my allowance to a whopping $2.00 a week.

    Dad had the logic down about allowance money:

    "I don't give you an allowance for doing chores,,,
    You do chores because you are a member of this household.
    I give you an allowance because you are my son,,,
    I love you and want you to have some pocket money."

    That didn't mean the allowance couldn't be forfeited,,,
    If I didn't do my chores that allowance was gone for that week.

    When it got to the point that I actually needed more money,,,
    Such as drooling over that 80-cc motorcycle,,,
    I was expected to go out and find a job.

    That wasn't easy though,,,
    There were a lot of kids in my neighborhood,,,
    All of them trying for that lawn mowing or trash pick-up job.

    My big break was when a Buchanan's Grocery Store opened up near us,,,
    I was one of the first kids in line for one of the "un-paid" jobs,,,
    I bagged groceries and schlepped them to cars for tips.

    That actually paid fairly well,,,
    Most of them old ladies would tip at least a dime,,,
    And if you were lucky you could often score a whole quarter.

    Minimum wage for an adult was $1.15/Hr back then,,,
    A buck for 2-3 hours easy work after school was a small fortune,,,
    That would buy me 20 rounds of mil-surp 8mm ammo at the surplus store.

    Aahhh,,,
    Simpler times.

    Aarond

    .
     
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  9. locutus

    locutus Well-Known Member Supporter

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    When I was 12, my dad bought me a "New, unissued, in the original cosmoline" G-1 1911 .45, Remington Rand, from Golden State Arms for $40.

    He also bought an M-1 Carbine, M-1 Garand, No.4, Mk1* SMLE all for under $50 each. A WW1 .30 Luger for around $15, and a .455 Webley for around $12. I still have all of them except the Luger and Webley. Plus I added a couple of Mausers, a Carcano and P-38 back in the late fifties with paper route money and summer job "hod carrier" money.

    My first gun that I bought with my own money, after my dad passed on was bought mail order when I was 13.
    Yeah, those really were the good old days.

    The Hod Carrier job convinced me to love school!:eek: That was a back breaker!!!!!:(:(
     
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  10. xring3

    xring3 Well-Known Member

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    Kids today don’t have a clue what a hod carrier is. But they will spend a ton of money to go to a gym and pay to lift weights.
     
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  11. Chainfire

    Chainfire Well-Known Member Supporter

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    My first C&R was also a Mauser of some type. I bought it when I was about 18 at a J.M. Fields store, somewhere around 1969. (J. M. Fields was one of the biggies of the day). It came out of a full barrel and I bought two for $20.00 apiece; one for me and one for my little brother. I have no clue as to what they were, but probably Turkish Mausers. All I knew was that they were rifles and I thought they were cool.

    Who knows where they got off to, but when I went to boot camp, my mother sold off a lot of my stuff, including my BSA Victor motorcycle and she spent the money. (I wasn't amused)
     
  12. xring3

    xring3 Well-Known Member

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    [​IMG]
    OMG.....I always wanted a BSA motorcycle. Guess this is as close as I can get.
     
  13. Chainfire

    Chainfire Well-Known Member Supporter

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    That motorcycle was rough on me. I only weighed about 125 pounds at the time, and when I kicked that starter, it kicked me back like a mule. I kept taking it back to the shop with "starting problems" and the 300 pound biker dude would hop on kick it over and it would start like a dream. He told me, for the truth, that I just didn't have enough azz. It was a fun ride though.
     
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  14. JTJ

    JTJ Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Absolute truth.
     
  15. xring3

    xring3 Well-Known Member

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    My brother had a Mark 2 Spitfire. I envied him. All I could afford was a rice burner.
     
  16. Chainfire

    Chainfire Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I think that I paid $250.00 for that BSA used, but it could not have been more than two years old. I never found out what my mother got for it, maybe just enough to buy a carton of cigarettes.
     
  17. JTJ

    JTJ Well-Known Member Supporter

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    With me it was my Dad. He gave away 2 handguns I had stored at the house while I was in Alaska. One was a 1903 Colt 32acp in near new condition. Sold an engine my older brother had stored and blamed me. Stored my record collection in a tin shed where it pretty much melted and dumped all my milsurp camping equipment.
     
  18. xring3

    xring3 Well-Known Member

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    I was fortunate that my folks didn’t sell off my stuff. I only have me to blame for the stupid stuff I did. I remember vividly my dad telling me I might want those late 1950’s and early 60’s baseball cards some day as I threw them in the trash. And he told me someday you’ll be sorry you sold your 1962 Chevy Nova convertible. And the list goes on........
     
  19. Chainfire

    Chainfire Well-Known Member Supporter

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    My mom told me she didn't think I would need the motorcycle when I was in the Navy......I guess she didn't figure I could have used the money either. Yea, it is not hard to carry a grudge for over 50 years.....
     
  20. Sniper03

    Sniper03 Supporting Member Supporter

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    I love the older military rifles and as I have said in the past, even today I could KMA!
    Because, when I was in High School I worked for my Dad's friend Don in his Gun Shop after school and on Saturday. Started out being a Gopher keeping the Shop clean and cleaning guns for him to resell in the Shop. But to the point, I use to buy a lot of older Mauser and other Military Rifles for $25-$30. Then Sporterised them and sell them for $50. $75 if tapped and drilled for a scope. Don was an excellent teacher and taught me how to do the tap and drill process correctly and also repair guns. And that kind of money at the time was good for a teenager! OK it was a long time ago! Gasoline was .27 a gallon.:p How do I remember that? Because I won a $100.00 Gas Gift Certificate in a Drawing at the Fair that was donated by Cecil Hubber's Standard Oil Filling Station.;)

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