My first 1911

Discussion in '1911 Forum' started by Diesel3, Oct 30, 2020.

  1. Diesel3

    Diesel3 Member

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    After quite a bit of research i decided on a Kimber TLE II. Weapon is standard issue to LAPD SWAT, Marine Force Recon Units, and some other notable agencies I cant remember.
    I figure if its good enough for them its gotta be ok for me.
    I take possession Tuesday!!
    Thoughts appreciated

    custom_tle_ii_2016__532x495.png
     
  2. Rifling82

    Rifling82 Well-Known Member Supporter

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  3. locutus

    locutus Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Nice weapon.
     
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  4. PeeJay1313

    PeeJay1313 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Kimber's are a lil on the pricey side, but there nice. I have a couple. Not one complaint.
     
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  5. AgedWarrior

    AgedWarrior Well-Known Member

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    I have handled and shot a few Kimber’s but never owned one. Congrats! Nice pistol!
     
  6. Ingramite

    Ingramite Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I've owned a couple 3" barrel models.

    The Kimber RCP has a much better fit and finish than the Colt New Agent.

    Anyway, they're the smallest, lightest, and smoothest 1911 that I've found. Perfect for pocket carry.

    I only made mention of my short barrelled Kimber 1911s because that configuration is the most difficult to get right. If they get the RCP right, confidence is high that yours will operate perfectly.

    The Schwartz safety is something unique to modern Kimber. You have to be aware of this safety during the take down and reassembly. In a nutshell, don't depress the grip safety during take down and assembly. It's a Series 80 like firing pin safety that's activated by the grip safety instead of the trigger.

    Next thing for you to consider is the proper break in procedure. Modern 1911s are all made on CNC milling equipment to much tighter tolerances than the old rattle trap your Dad and Grandfather carried.

    Tighter manufacturing tolerances may require some cleaning and lubrication during the break in. It's not uncommon for the break in to approach 500 rounds.

    During this break in period you might experience a misfeed or failure to eject...or two. All of this info is in the instructions included with the pistol.

    If you go beyond the break in period and continue to have anything other than flawless performance then contact Kimber right away.

    1911s get a bad rap because of all of the stuff that I just ran down to you. While it's important to be aware of the stuff in case difficulties occur, all of my 1911s operated flawlessly out of the box. Even a couple of "cheaper " 1911s that I have were perfect.

    Enjoy your pistol and be sure to post a range report along with your first impressions.
     
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  7. Pasquanel

    Pasquanel Proud to be an American Supporter

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    I have 3 Kimbers, .45acp, 10mm, .22 LR, the 45 and 10 were flawless out of the box the .22LR took about 400 rds before it would run right. It's been great ever since and very accurate.

    Nice gun btw I'm sure you will love it.
     
  8. G66enigma

    G66enigma Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Nice.

    Have shot a couple of Kimbers, over the years. Haven't ever owned one.

    My only 1911 was a Shadow .45, basically an Officer's frame with 3" bbl. Fairly easy to carry. Sold it to a 1911-aholic who was wanting one. He corrected a couple of fitting issues, and ended up quite happy.
     
  9. Diesel3

    Diesel3 Member

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    I think my main all around concern is acquiring the ammunition lol.
    45ACP is going for around $700 per 1k rounds.
    It may find a home in the safe til this panic passes.
     
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  10. Chainfire

    Chainfire Well-Known Member Supporter

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    That is a fine way to enter the 1911 fold. With the current situation it will soon be, "buy 500 rounds of ammo and get a free gun."
     
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  11. To piggyback on Ingramite's break-in advice, I suggest doing a detail disassembly, thorough cleaning, and generous lubing of the pistol when you take possession of it. During the break-in period don't clean it. Just keep it well lubed. The soot, grit, and carbon from firing will mix with the lube and act as a mild abrasive that will greatly help the parts mate and further smooth the action.
     
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  12. Diesel3

    Diesel3 Member

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    Oght to be interesting tearing down the weapon. Never done a 1911 before.
    Found a great video on YouTube tearing down, cleaning, and reassembling.
    Only question I have is where are the lubrication points? I'm hoping the manual will show where.
    Also I've always used CLP on my glocks. Is that ok on a 1911?
    TIA
     
    Last edited: Nov 2, 2020
  13. Fred_G

    Fred_G Well-Known Member

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    Love my TLE II. Only problems I had was the grips were a bit too aggressive for my hands (a bit of light sanding took care of that) and the thumb safety is not fitted as well as my other 1911's. Going to do some more blending on it this week. It pinches the web of my strong hand...

    But, for what I paid, nice gun. I am sure you will like yours.
     
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  14. The 1911 was designed at the beginning of the 20th century as a combat weapon. As such, it loves oil. You could toss it into a bucket of oil, pull it out a week later, hang it up on a clothes line to drain for an hour, and then go shoot it.

    You'll know when you've over-lubed it when you get sprayed with oil every time you pull the trigger. CLP is fine to use as is any other oil (I prefer synthetic oil). Be generous on the slide and frame rails, the barrel hood, the barrel bushing, the recoil spring guide rod, the mainspring housing tunnel, and the lower barrel lugs/link. A thin coat of oil on all other internal parts and surfaces including inside the barrel (oil inside the barrel won't hurt anything).

    Basically, don't get hung up on specific lube points. No need to worry about only using a single drop here and there. Run the thing wet. Keep it wet for the first 500 rounds. After that do whatever you think is best.
     
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  15. oO_Rogue_Oo

    oO_Rogue_Oo Well-Known Member

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    The TLE is a great no nonsense "got everything you need and nothing you don't" 1911. Enjoy :)
     
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  16. ifithitu

    ifithitu Well-Known Member

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    Sweet looking 1911 Kimber. Congrats:cool:
     
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  17. Fred_G

    Fred_G Well-Known Member

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    I did have the Swartz or however it is spelled stuff removed. Need to go ahead and strip it down and replace the trigger with a flat one. The more I shoot it, the more I like it. Mine had possibly an aftermarket MSH that had a hole for a lanyard. I replaced it with a Nighthawk MSH and a two piece magwell. Love it, I messed up and ordered the serrated one instead of the checkered one... Still shoots good! IMG_1125[1].JPG
     
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