Mossberg 500 rant!

Discussion in 'General Shotgun Discussion' started by colmustard, Jul 11, 2013.

  1. colmustard

    colmustard New Member

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    Ok I am an Remington 870 shooter so was not familiar with the moss 500. Well I was out sport clay shooting with a friend and noticed they could not put more than 2 rounds into their mag tube. Yes I know this is due to a stopper for hunting laws, I have one for my 870 when I hunt.

    But the kicker is, why does Mossberg make it so hard to get to that safety plug? On a Remington all you do is unscrew the cap on top of the tube and pull the barrel then pull the spring along with stopper out. Take stopper out and replace spring. Do the reverse when it is time for hunting season. This takes 2 min.

    But the Mossberg no way! You cannot unscrew the top of the mag tube!? How weird is that? Sorry rant over, just thought it was so weird and it just makes it more complicated.
     
  2. SSGN_Doc

    SSGN_Doc Well-Known Member

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    I didn't find it hard to remove at all. Unscrew the barrel retaining screw, tip the shotgun downward until the plug hits the screw hole. Remove the plug, and replace the barrel. Probably a minute or so in reality. Maybe it just gets easier the more times I do it. But really don't find it more difficult than my 870.
     

  3. colmustard

    colmustard New Member

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    Yes but the fact that you cannot easily take the spring out is what also bothers me. When I clean a firearm, I disassemble and check all parts including the spring. That design makes it rather a pain to check your spring and make sure that there are no cracks in it.
     
  4. Virginian

    Virginian Active Member

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    Different designs is all. They both have a pretty strong following, having outsold every other shotgun design in history combined, between them.
     
  5. SSGN_Doc

    SSGN_Doc Well-Known Member

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    But try changing a dented mag tube out on an 870.
     
  6. colmustard

    colmustard New Member

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    LOL you got me there! :) Would not want to do that!
     
  7. SSGN_Doc

    SSGN_Doc Well-Known Member

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    Both guns have their strengths and weaknesses. I like them both, learned to live with either.
     
  8. bikerlbf406

    bikerlbf406 New Member

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    I know I took the stopper out of my 500, and so did by dad......took less then 5 minutes for both. (we don't hunt)
     
  9. Virginian

    Virginian Active Member

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    Really not that hard NOT to dent the mag tube on an 870 either.
     
  10. SSGN_Doc

    SSGN_Doc Well-Known Member

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    True. Just making a point. I did see a 870 at a shop that was selling cheap. I asked why, they pointed out the mag tube that had a dent, slowing only one round in the mag a d causing the spring to stick. Said it took special tool to remove it to get the dent out. Apparently the previous owner griped or slipped entering his duck blind and got his weight plus what he was carrying on the tube and an edge of the duck blind framework. I passed on that project but leaned of a trick to get the dent out without removing the tube. If I find another wing master at that price with the same problem, I'll pick it up.
     
  11. DrumJunkie

    DrumJunkie New Member

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    ^^^^^^^^^
    This is a simple truth. I own both and can honestly say function is pretty close. I think the action is a little more smooth in the 870 but my Mossy patters as good or better with cheaper ammo. High brass and they both are pretty close.
     
  12. ninjatoth

    ninjatoth New Member

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    I bought my first 500 today and by chance found that stopper.I kept hearing a rattle and took the barrel off and shook the gun to see where that noise was coming from and 2 seconds later this dowel rod fell out, I knew it wasn't part of the gun so I kept it out and Googled what that was.
     
  13. Missouribound

    Missouribound Well-Known Member

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    It falls out on mine. Perhaps the one you are discussing has other issues.
     
  14. OldEagleEars

    OldEagleEars New Member

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    The dowel in mine had a couple of rubber O-rings that kept it from rattling in the tube. I kept the thing and use it for removing the Laserlite laser training cartridge from the chamber of my 1911's...or pushing out a blown-up brass if such should ever happen.
     
  15. Missouribound

    Missouribound Well-Known Member

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    Ahh...the art of re-purposing.....well done.:D
     
  16. bobski

    bobski Well-Known Member Sponsor

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    because inexpensive guns werent meant to be fiddled with. most 500 owners never shoot the gun more than once a year as it is, so the need to put more than 2 or 3 in at a time is rare.
    but now that we are into the shotgun pimping stage of shotgun ownership in america....where people pay more for the bling and snake oil accessories for a shotgun than what thay paid for the shotgun itself, everyone wants to tinker with a gun that was sent from the factory in working order. and when they do they find out the gun wasnt meant to be screwed with by back yard gunsmiths.
    just because a gun is the biggest selling gun doesnt make it the best gun.
    its an average gun marketed and sold to average owners.
    what the problem is is, average people try to make average guns better than average by trying to go in the back door. instead of paying for quality, they assume they can out think mfg'ers and make a better gun themselves...which ends up being more expensive than if they just bought a nice gun thats well built to begin with.
    guns like 500's, western field, sears, hi standards, ted williams, etc...werent meant to last long. why do you supposethey were sold in hardware stores? they are garden tools. the only reason you still see them around is most owners bought them with intentions of using it once a year. and did.
    but if you were to take one of those guns and shot it 500 rounds a day for years...it would wear out. it was meant to be discarded and a new one was to bought when it fell apart.
    500's were and are such a gun from conception.
    and knowing the famous military murphy law of .."your gun was built by the lowest bidder"...came true as we wore out 500's on occasion in the 'teams' as the alloy receivers buckled and froze up from all day summer slug and buck shot training. we went back to 870's in the mid 90's.
    just thought id share this with the 500 worshipers.
     
    Last edited: Jul 13, 2013
  17. SSGN_Doc

    SSGN_Doc Well-Known Member

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    Shotguns I've quaked with in the Navy since my first shotgun qual in 1996 have been Mossbergs. 500, 590, 590a1. Carried one in Haiti because it was still policy that Corpsmen couldn't carry a rifle as routine practice.

    My last shotgun qual last year was with a 500 with some Navy specific features. Never had a problem with them. Navy hasn't phased them out and I have only seen 870s with Army units. Marines were still using 590A1 and the Benelli.
     
  18. Missouribound

    Missouribound Well-Known Member

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    There is nothing in your lengthy post that I can agree with. The Mossberg 500 has proven the test of time. It's reliable, it's inexpensive and I'd guess that of the 13,000,000 made, most of them were heavily used, not just 2 or 3 times a year, and few of them fell apart or wore out. More than likely they were parted out, or "customised" to the point that they became unusable. As far as being the best? Who gets to decide that? The most expensive is certainly not the best...and often the cheapest is not the best.
    What every product stands the test of time, has the most reliable performance, has the largest customer base, has the best mfg. support and has the most vesatility. Am I a 500 worshipper....nope. But I respect what Mossberg has done and I am not a snob who will only shoot guns which sell for thousands, while I can buy a Mossberg and outshoot the expensive guns.
     
  19. OldEagleEars

    OldEagleEars New Member

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    In my dreams I drive a Ferrari 250GT SWB coupe, hunt grouse with a Holland & Holland double, conceal-carry an Ed Brown Bobtail (with Signature engraving), open-carry a Cabot "Joe" and defend my home with a Browning M1919A-6. In real life I drive a PT Cruiser, don't hunt anymore because of old injuries, my 1911's come from Rock Island Armory and I defend my home with a Mossberg 500. Life is what happens while you're busy making plans and for most of us we get the best we can afford that will do the job. I'll tug my forelock in honor of bobski's superior taste in weaponry if that will make him happy but I will not apologize for my choices. What or who I shoot will be just as dead from my "cheap" firearm as from one that costs what my house did.
     
  20. SSGN_Doc

    SSGN_Doc Well-Known Member

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    I'm not going to deny that what bobski says is true with regard to the Mossberg being made to a price point to appeal to a wider market.

    It has a lower cost aluminum receiver. it has rails riveted to the pump instead of welded. These do not seem to hurt reliability or function, but they do save in cost. They do affect the feel. They also placed the safety in a good location for right and left handed users and placed the slide release in a more ergonomic position as well.

    And as I said I like 870s and 500 series shotguns:
    [​IMG]

    They both will get the job done
    [​IMG]