Mosin Nagant stock project

Discussion in 'DIY Projects' started by chloeshooter, Nov 19, 2013.

  1. chloeshooter

    chloeshooter New Member

    2,565
    0
    0
    Got into the Russian Rifle Addiction lately, have been spending some time practicing refurb work on these "cheap" rifles. I'd like to get into restoring other rifles but want to know what works best before I spend bigger bucks The 1940 Tula (left in first pic) is the darker color; don't think I will touch it other than the furniture polish I have used. The 1938 Izhevsk is the one I refinished; it was more of a red color to begin with. I got pretty close, would like a closer match but probably need to use shellack like the Ruskies did. image-3431245230.jpg I used Minwax Senoma Red stain, applying 4 thin coats, then, finished with 5 coats of tung oil image-3159327326.jpg image-2135063449.jpg It's very dry right now in Minnesota so this normally week long job took about 3 and 1/2 days due to a no-humidity work space. image-1368325425.jpg Of course the Izhevsk has the better stock and the Tula better iron. Of course! But all numbers match so no thought of mix and match. I'm a big fan of the luster tung oil provides. We will have to see how it holds up but do far we are pleased image-3971162742.jpg



    image-666376029.jpg
     
    Last edited: Nov 19, 2013
  2. Mercator

    Mercator New Member

    11,337
    2
    0
    well done. What is it the British did not understand about rifle stocks? Almost any Mosin has a better wood stock to begin with than an Enfield. Most Ive seen are driftwood.
     

  3. chloeshooter

    chloeshooter New Member

    2,565
    0
    0
    Thanks.

    My guess is the Brits used up all their decent wood years before building the largest wooden ship navy the world has ever seen
     
  4. FullautoUSA

    FullautoUSA Welcoming Committee/ Resident Pellet Gunner Lifetime Supporter

    2,627
    1
    0
    Some fine rifles right there!
     
  5. fupuk

    fupuk New Member

    1,672
    0
    0
    I need to redo my mosin over the winter, yours look way better than mine. Did you sand the stock first and what grit did you use? I did mine but I dont think I got down to bare wood before I stained.
     
  6. sputnik1988

    sputnik1988 Active Member

    2,883
    2
    38
    :confused: mine looks pretty good, I thought so anyway.
     

    Attached Files:

  7. sputnik1988

    sputnik1988 Active Member

    2,883
    2
    38

    Russian Mosins are generally force matched, they are 30 different rifles in one with matching serial numbers added later, after the arsenal rebuild.

    I'd say it would be a chore finding one that wasn't matching.
     
    Last edited: Nov 22, 2013
  8. chloeshooter

    chloeshooter New Member

    2,565
    0
    0
    how many would you like me to send you? I went through about 15 looking for 1 that had all matching numbers.
     
  9. chloeshooter

    chloeshooter New Member

    2,565
    0
    0
    I used a furniture stripper first; that took most of the stain off, and I kept at it with steel wool until it was bare wood (wish I had taken a picture of that). I then wiped it down real good with mineral spirits and used more steel wool (this time, '0' grade). I used no sandpaper whatsoever but did spend some time and considerable elbow grease with the steel wool

    From there, it was stain and then the tung oil. Good luck, show us pics when you are done please
     
  10. schuylar81

    schuylar81 New Member

    2
    0
    0
    Beautiful job man I'm working on a nagant m44 myself I used sand paper, started with a heavy grit to remove the surface then went finer. After I hit it with the steel wool. So far so good, I'm planing on staining it a charcoal tone not original I know but I think it will look cool. Thanks for sharing. And again that's beautiful work.
     
  11. chloeshooter

    chloeshooter New Member

    2,565
    0
    0
    Thank you!
     
  12. stringplucker

    stringplucker New Member

    19
    0
    0
    Looks good. I've had a number of these fine firearms come across my bench over the years. My favorite is a 1942 Izhevsk 91/30. It has many rough machined parts and machine marks...it's far from pretty, but still one heck of a rifle. It has a beech stock that I stripped and smoothed, leaving armory marks and oil stained areas intact. Most of those stains are in the wrist area, showing how often it was handled I was unable to get the stock to accept the Sedona Red stain I bought. In the end, I finished mine off with Tung Oil and called it a day.

    Yours came out really nice looking...good job!
     
  13. chloeshooter

    chloeshooter New Member

    2,565
    0
    0
    Thanks! I used a lot of mineral spirits after stripping per the suggestion of the 'old guy' at the local hardware store, I think that helped the wood accept the stain. Also these were not all made from the sane wood. The lighter colored one was spruce I believe
     
  14. John_Deer

    John_Deer New Member

    6,624
    1
    0
    The 91/30 is finished with shellac. To get the original finish use amber shellac as a sanding sealer. Stain the stock with red mahogany. Then give the stock as many coats of amber shellac as you like. The nice thing about shellac is it is very easy to repair. Use a rag with a fine texture such as an old sheet. Dampen the rag with denatured alcohol. Place the rag on the damaged area until the shellac is "soft." Then use the rag to gently push the shellac into the damaged area. Allow the stock a couple hours to dry. I have used this technique to repair antique furniture I bought at auction for pennies on the dollar. After the repair I have run furniture back through the same auction house for a healthy profit.

    Don't use paint thinner to clean your tools or to wipe the dust off a surface you are going to finish with shellac. Use denatured alcohol to clean up your tools or prepare the surface for a coat of shellac.
     
    Last edited: Jan 11, 2014
  15. Mercator

    Mercator New Member

    11,337
    2
    0
    Is the shellac okay for in-house furniture? I have some that could use restoration. Is it clear by itself or has an amber color?
     
  16. John_Deer

    John_Deer New Member

    6,624
    1
    0
    There is clear shellac but it is not truly clear. I prefer amber shellac for that reason. If you do a little research on shellac you will see the main ingredient is crushed beetles. Given that the main ingredient is a crushed bug it's easy to see why I say that there is no truly clear shellac.
     
  17. chuckusaret

    chuckusaret Member

    509
    0
    16
    Nice job. After stripping the stock some of the small dings/dents can be removed with a good steam iron, cloth and patience.