Mosin Nagant/Bolt Action Shooting Tips

Discussion in 'General Rifle Discussion' started by GrumpyPine, Apr 24, 2010.

  1. GrumpyPine

    GrumpyPine New Member

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    This question isn't necessarily specific to the Russian lady, but in my particular case that's what I'm shooting. Every video I see of those firing a bolt action involves them taking their eyes away from the sights/scope, lowering the rifle and working the action. If that is the case, how are you supposed to get decent groupings on the paper (besides just being a decent shot :rolleyes: )?

    I had my Mosin out at the range a week ago and got some decent "patterns" on paper at 50 yards (nothing I would call a "group"), and at 100 yards I was laughing at myself for hitting the paper twice... but not really in the black. I have a feeling I'm doing a lot to mess myself up in regards to resetting my point of aim every time I have to work the bolt.

    I know the gun is capable of accuracy beyond 100 yards with the iron sights - maybe I'm not at this point!
     
  2. gschnarr

    gschnarr New Member

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    It could also be your ammo. With bolt actions, you will normally lose some portion of you weld or cheek placement. Practice will help your be able to reproduce your hold. It takes time.
     

  3. LittleBear

    LittleBear New Member

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    Remember the 4 fundemtals of marksmanship. Steady Position, Sight Picture, Breathing, Trigger Squeeze....Also Are you using a M44 or the 91/30? The M44 is a Carbine and has a much shorter range and is less accurate.
     
  4. GrumpyPine

    GrumpyPine New Member

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    I'm using a 91/30, currently just using it from a bench rest. Was out at the range again yesterday and did quite a bit better- I have a 100 yard target with the proper number of holes in it ;) That's that whole practice thing gschnarr was talking about at work.

    The ammo is just lacquer coated 147gr Bulgarian stuff. I really need to go to town cleaning the thing because after my first 10 rounds it starts to stick so bad that I don't have a chance to reproduce my hold. Sticky bolt is probably the last thing you want when trying to be consistent.

    I'm looking at grabbing a 10/22 and heading to a local appleseed shoot coming up in mid May so I can do some "official" learning.
     
  5. dteed4094

    dteed4094 New Member

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    It may just be the gun. I shot 20 rounds at 100 yds from a recently acquired 91/30. The bore looked very good as did the overall condition. I gave my other 91/30 to my step son, taking for granted the newer one would out shoot the first one that was counter bored and looked like a sewer pipe down the tube. The better looking one covered an 8 1/2 x 11 paper aiming at the bottom edge. The older one grouped 5 inches at 100 yds. Normally I would say it was me but after shooting the Mosin, I shot a 2 inch group with an 8mm mauser with iron sights. I hear about what good shooters 91/30s are but you couldn't prove it by me!
     
    Last edited: May 12, 2010
  6. jpattersonnh

    jpattersonnh Active Member

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    I have found that my 91/30's shoot Yugo Heavy ball best. Hungarian light ball shoots well. 1970's and '80's soviet light ball shoots well also.
     
  7. GrumpyPine

    GrumpyPine New Member

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    I was told that the guns weren't designed to shoot the heavier-grain bullets because it can create too much pressure. Is that true at all? I know the Winchester (S&B?) new production stuff is all 180gr. It doesn't make sense to me that they would produce ammunition that isn't safe to use.

    +1 for guy at range blowing smoke, right?
     
    Last edited: May 12, 2010
  8. willshoum

    willshoum New Member

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    Reset Position

    I watched a special on the tube about people that lower thier rifles after firing. Some people cannot get the hang of lifting the bolt while keeping thier eyes on the target. It showed several ways to acomplish this. One guy used his thumb to lift the bolt and pull back and reload another round using thumb only. this takes a lot of practice and is hard on the thumb. Practice till it hurts, then practice some more!!! Have a Good Day at the Range!!!!
     
  9. GrumpyPine

    GrumpyPine New Member

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    That's an interesting idea. I would imagine it can work quite well with a new, modern bolt action. I'll certainly give it a try with the Mosin, but I think it might just have too much resistance to operate with one finger. I can't remember exactly, but I might smash myself in the nose with the bolt if I leave my face there? :( Will have to try this weekend and really pay attention to my cheek weld.

    Found this on ye-olde youtube: [ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=38024w3NCs8]YouTube - Bolt Throwing[/ame]

    Good or bad?
     
  10. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    Grumpy- ref: sticky bolt syndrome- there is usually a thin layer of gook still in the chamber. When it heats up, starts binding to the fired case. Two choices: 1. Carry a 3 ft length of 2x4 to beat the bolt open. 2. Remove bolt from rifle. Get a cleaning rod, about a 20 g shotgun brush, a drill, and a bottle of Hoppes. Chuck rod into drill, dip brush in Hoppes, while SPINNING, work into and out of the chamber. Keep it moving for about 30 seconds, then swab dry. Had a couple I would have SWORN were spotless- but I was wrong.
     
  11. GrumpyPine

    GrumpyPine New Member

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    Thanks for the advice, shooter. I actually did just that before my last trip to the range. I followed a modified version that was from YouTube that involved Borebright and polishing the chamber.

    I also spent what felt like about an hour and a half with a bottle of Hoppes and 40 bazillion of the girlfriend's Q-Tips just swabbing out the area where the lugs (or what I think are the lugs?) lock inside the chamber. When inspected with a borelight I could see the stuff just sitting there, which made sense to me as the cause for the bolt refusing to open after firing if that stuff was melting and then re-fusing to the bolt lugs.

    End result, no sticking on the next trip! It's certainly not butter smooth, but I didn't have any periods that caused me to set the rifle down and bang on it with my palm.
     
  12. jpattersonnh

    jpattersonnh Active Member

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    The 91/30 is designed for heavy ball. 91/30 PU sniper rifles shoot it exclusively. Light ball is what I use in my PSL. If you look at the original design of the FMJ bullet for the Model 1891 it is heavy ball (210gr).

    Here is Yugo heavy ball. http://7.62x54r.net/MosinID/20050112021.jpg

    Polish light ball. http://7.62x54r.net/MosinID/20060422034.jpg

    1986 Soviet light ball. http://7.62x54r.net/MosinID/20041231003.jpg

    Notice the Soviet 1986 and Yugo heavy ball follow the same trajectory path, The Polish shoots slightly higher.