More WW II now and then excellent!

Discussion in 'History' started by boatme98, Apr 25, 2018.

  1. Rex in OTZ

    Rex in OTZ Well-Known Member

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    Teddy Roosevelt Jr
    At 57, he was the oldest man in the entire D-Day Invasion, now in the midst of storming ashore on the northern coast of France in the greatest amphibious assault in military history. He was also the only general to personally hit the beach on D-Day.
    Bobbing alongside his troops in a wildly careening LCVP, Theodore Roosevelt Jr. gripped the walking cane he used to get around on his bum left knee—the unwelcome souvenir of the first Great War, after receiving a German machine-gun bullet taken near Soissons in July 1918.

    He was also using the cane to fend off the well-intentioned assistance of one of his men as they got ready to jump into the landing craft 11 miles from the French coast.

    “Get the hell out of my way,” he growled good-naturedly. “I can jump in here by myself. I can take it as well as any of you.”

    No one who knew “Ted” Roosevelt could ever doubt the truth of that statement.



    https://warfarehistorynetwork.com/daily/wwii/d-day-invasion-tales-teddy-roosevelt-jrs-bold-decision/
     

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  2. Rex in OTZ

    Rex in OTZ Well-Known Member

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    One ne never hear much about.
    The North American A-36 Apache(listed in some sources as "Invader", but also called Mustang) was the ground-attack/dive bomber version of the North American P-51 Mustang, from which it could be distinguished by the presence of rectangular, slatted dive brakes above and below the wings. A total of 500 A-36 dive bombers served in North Africa, the Mediterranean, Italy and the China-Burma-India theater during World War IIbefore being withdrawn from operational use in 1944.

     

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  3. Rex in OTZ

    Rex in OTZ Well-Known Member

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    The first instance in U.S. Naval history that the entire crew of a ship had been arrested.

    This WWII Naval Ship Was So Unlucky, It Almost Killed FDR.

    The USS William D. Porter — “Willie Dee” to her crew — was a War World II destroyer, and is arguably the unluckiest ship in the history of the world.
    She lasted less than two years, until her ill-fated demise in June of 1945, according to a piece originally published in The Retired Officer Magazine by historian Kit Bonner in 1994.
    The USS William D. Porter (DD-579) was one of the many war-built assembly line destroyers. Although the ships were small compared to modern-day destroyers, they were formidable forces in their time. Their main armament included 10 fast-running and accurate torpedoes that carried 500-pound warheads, but also included anti-aircraft artillery weapons.
    The USS William D. Porter was commissioned on July 6th 1943 under the command of Lt. Cmdr. Wilfred A. Walter. In November of 1943, she was ordered to accompany the battleship USS Iowa (BB-61) on a secret mission across the Atlantic that the cherry crew of the Porter was told nothing about. The green crew members quickly learned its tasks and purposes before setting sail, but clearly wasn’t ready for its upcoming mission — a few days later, they almost killed the precious secret cargo aboard the Big Stick (BB-61) USS Iowa: carried President Roosevelt, Secretary of State Cordell Hull, Chief of Staff Admiral William D. Leahy, Chief of Staff of the Army General George C. Marshall, Chief of Naval Operations Ernest King, Commanding General of the U.S. Army Air Forces Henry "Hap" Arnold, Harry Hopkins, and other military leaders to Mers El Kébir, Algeria, on the first leg of the journey to the Tehran Conference.
    The series of misfortunes began with the surreptitious order to escort the Iowa to North Africa.
    On November 12, she sailed out of Norfolk to meet up with the USS Iowa and two other ships. Unfortunately, her sailors failed to properly raise the anchor.
    Which was why it tore into a docked destroyer. Railings, lifeboat mounts, the captain’s gig (a small taxi boat), and other equipment were ripped off the other ship. Thankfully, no one was hurt or killed.
    The Willie Dee suffered only minor scratches to her anchor, but this marked the beginning of her two-year life of total chaos.
    About 24 hours later, the four-ship convoy consisting of the William D. Porter, the USS Iowa, and two other destroyers had set sail for Africa. All of the ships were under strict orders to maintain total silence as they sailed through the waters that were suspected to contain German U-boats. The ships hoped to quickly and quietly cross the ocean undetected. Not long into the journey, there was a massive explosion that shook the entire small fleet. All of the ships immediately began anti-submarine maneuvering.
    The chaos continued until Walter admitted that a depth charge had fallen off of the stern of his ship. The safety on the charge had mistakenly not been set, and when it crashed into the rough sea, it detonated.
    Soon after accidentally detonating a depth charge, a huge wave smashed into the William D. Porter — thus stripping it of everything that wasn’t tied down — and a man was washed overboard, never to be seen again. As a result of the wave, the engine room lost power in one of its boilers. The mission, which had demanded total silence, turned into an hourly reporting fiasco from Walter to the BB-61.
    On Nov. 14th, 1943, the four ships were east of Bermuda when the president wanted to test the defenses of the USS Iowa in the event that they came under an air attack. The crew of the Big Stick launched weather balloons to simulate anti-aircraft targets, and fired over 100 guns. In command of the William D. Porter, Walter, wanting to join in on the fun and redeem himself for the Willie Dee’s earlier episodes, sent his men to their battle stations.
    Willie Dee’s crew started shooting at the Iowa’s missed balloons that had drifted toward their ship. Down below on the torpedo mounts, the crew was preparing to take practice shots at the USS Iowa — which was 6,000 yards away. During live torpedo drills, primers, or small explosive charges, are removed for practice, but one of the torpedomen forgot to remove the primer from one of the torpedo tubes. Just as the torpedo officer ordered the fake firing command, a successfully armed and launched torpedo whizzed across the sea, straight toward the USS Iowa, endangering some of the world’s most influential figures, including Roosevelt.
    According to Bonner, a prominent historian who has studied the Porter, “the next five minutes aboard the Willie Dee were pandemonium.” T
    he crew ran around yelling conflicting orders, and tried to think of the best way to contact the USS Iowa under their stringent orders of silence.William D. Porter attempted to signal Iowa about the incoming torpedo but, owing to orders to maintain radio silence, used a signal lamp instead. However, the destroyer first misidentified the direction of the torpedo and then relayed the wrong message, informing Iowa that Porter was backing up, rather than that a torpedo was in the water.
    In desperation the destroyer finally broke radio silence, using codewords that relayed a warning message to Iowa regarding the incoming torpedo. After confirming the identity of the destroyer, Iowa turned hard to avoid being hit by the torpedo.
    When Roosevelt heard that a torpedo was zooming toward him, he asked to be moved with his wheelchair over to the railing so that he could see it. Fearing an Presidential assassination plot, the USS Iowa turned its main guns toward the William D. Porter — however, the crisis ended when the torpedo finally detonated as it struck heavy wake created by the USS Iowa’s increased speed.
    This was the first instance in U.S. Naval history that the entire crew of a ship had been arrested.
    Following these events, the ship and her crew were ordered to Bermuda for an inquiry into the Iowa affair. Chief Torpedoman (CTM(AA)) Lawton Dawson, whose failure to remove the torpedo's primer had enabled it to fire at Iowa, was later sentenced to hard labor, though President Roosevelt intervened in his case, as the incident had been an accident. Contrary to Internet legend, LCDR Walter was not relieved of command following the incident and remained in command until 30 May 1944. He later commanded other ships and eventually became a Rear Admiral. William D. Porter was in Bermuda from 16 to 23 November 1943, no mention was made of awaiting Marines or the entire crew being "arrested" in the ship's logs.
    Since the affair was deemed an accident, the WDP was sent to the Aleutian Islands. She was assigned to Task Force 94 in Unalaska at the Dutch Harbor Naval Operating Base and Fort Mears where she could do no harm.
    Or so the thinking went.
    It worked. Until December 31, that is, when the base commandant hosted a party for officers and their families. The WDP was also partying – which was how a drunk sailor got it into his head to fire one of the ship’s 5” guns. The shell landed on the commandant’s front yard, taking out his flower garden, and mercifully, nothing and no one else.
    They finally replaced Walter with Commander Charles M. Keyes on May 30, 1944. Which is probably why the WDP was allowed to participate in the Battle of Okinawa… where she accidentally strafed the USS Luce. Fortunately, she made up for it by shooting down five Japanese planes.

    The William D. Porter was assigned to Okinawa, Japan, and finally did a fine job destroying many different Japanese aircraft … oh, and three American aircraft. Those who greeted the ship’s crew often joked, “Don’t shoot, we’re Republicans!” On June 10, 1945, the ship ran out of any luck it ever possessed. When a fully-loaded kamikaze plane — a very old Japanese Val dive bomber constructed mostly from canvas and wood — snuck into U.S. airspace, it attempted to crash into a ship near the William D. Porter. However, at the last moment, it veered away and crashed alongside the Willie Dee. The plane sunk, drifting underneath where it exploded underneath of the ill-fated destroyer. This tore open the ship’s hull and caused the ship to sink.In a final twist of much-deserved luck — all of the crew survived.
    https://m.warhistoryonline.com/inst...-jinxed-ship-uss-william-d-porter-dd-579.html
     

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    Last edited: Nov 11, 2018
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  4. Rex in OTZ

    Rex in OTZ Well-Known Member

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    Operation "Pinball"
    The best way to train a pilot is to have him fly a real airplane until he is proficient - right? So why not train aerial gunners by letting them actually shoot at real planes? This was the concept behind one of the US Army Air Forces’ most unusual training programs in World War II, often referred to as Operation Pinball.
    The main use of the P-63 in American USAAF service was the unusual one of a manned flying target for gunnery practice.
    The Bell P-63 Kingcobra was selected as the target aircraft. As it was a type not used by front-line USAAF units, it was easily available. The P-63, designated RP-63, was given 1-inch thick armored glass with special armor in vulnerable areas. Sensors underneath the RP-63 registered hits and lights on the spinner and on the fuselage would light up, giving rise to the name "Pinball".
    Beginning in early 1945 RP-63 Pinballs would fly attack profiles against bombers with student gunners before they were assigned to a combat unit. A training B-17 might have 12 student gunners each having 2,000 rounds of Fairchild's special frangible ammunition to fire at the Pinballs. The Pinball pilots, flying RP-63s that were painted either dayglo orange or yellow, flew 2-3 missions a day from bases throughout the United States. Minor damage was easily repaired on the flightline but the Achilles heel of the Pinball was the wingroot air ducts that provided cooling air to the mid-fuselage mounted Allison V-1710 liquid-cooled engine. If a frangible bullet got into the duct, the fragments could damage the cooling system, resulting in an overheating engine and a mandatory deadstick landing or a bailout by the RP-63 pilot.
    A total of 300 P-63s were converted to the RP-63 Pinball configuration. Some aircraft also trained B-29 Superfortress gunners.



    https://www.airspacemag.com/military-aviation/just-shoot-me-57581298/

    http://www.tailsthroughtime.com/2010/09/bell-rp-63-pinball.html?m=1

    Frangible

    While .30-06 Frangible rounds are common, the story of their development is not well known. They were actually developed during WWII by Duke and Princeton Universities as part of a government contract. The intent was to develop a bullet that could be used to train bomber gun crews by allowing them to fire at a real aircraft. It took several years to arrive at a suitable bullet (and an armored aircraft for that matter). The common mottled grey-green bullet is actually a mixture of powdered lead and Bakelite, officially referred to as RD-42-93. Usually found with green and white bullet tips, they can sometimes appear with either no tip color or just white tip. In the majority of cases, these are simply rounds that have escaped the complete painting process. Those loaded on commercial cases (as opposed to having a military headstamp) might, repeat "might", be from the early experiments at Duke and Princeton.

    Initially called the T44, the frangible was adopted as the M22. A round with a different powder and a tan and green bullet tip was called the T74.

    One unusual frangible round has a short sharp bullet with a black tip (and a hemispherical base) and was actually for testing the armor plate on the target aircraft.

    There is an extremely rare and often faked Frangible Tracer, identified by a red and white bullet tip. Because the trace cavity in the bullet was unsealed and trace compositions expand over time, most of these have long since broken apart.


    Pinballs get revved and ready to be shot down — sometimes for real when a frangible bullet found its way into the cooling duct at the wing root. War’s end and new
    technologies sent the Pinball to the ground for good. (National Museum Of The USAF)
     

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    Last edited: Nov 25, 2018
  5. schnuffleupagus

    schnuffleupagus Well-Known Member

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    Better to put evil on display, naked in defeat rather than attempting to erase it. Erasing the past is a tactic of Big Brother.
    Placing a Star of David,? Possibly, how about a museum displaying stolen art and broken people? How the slave labor slowed progress at Penemunde? How the Jews continued to be treated by the Soviets and the Arabs, abandoned by the British.

    Destroying statues and architecture that embarass our modern sensibilities is indicative of fear more than loathing.
     
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  6. manta

    manta Well-Known Member Supporter

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  7. Rex in OTZ

    Rex in OTZ Well-Known Member

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    Operation Green
    The Nazi plan to invade Ireland.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Operation_Green_(Ireland)

    To counteract any Nazi invasion of Neutral Ireland was Plan W, a planned occupation of all of the state by the British Armed Forces, was drafted by the British military in secret liaison with the Irish government to counteract any German invasion
    Irish-British co-operation was a controversial proposal for both sides, as most members of the Irish political establishment had been combatants in the Irish War of Independence between 1919 and 1921. However, because of the threat of German occupation and seizure of Ireland and especially the valuable Irish ports, Plan W was developed. Northern Ireland was to serve as the base of a new British Expeditionary Force that would move across the Irish border to repel the invaders from any beach-head established by German paratroopers. In addition, coordinated actions of the Royal Air Force and Royal Navy were planned to repel German air and sea invasion. According to a restricted file prepared by the British Army's "Q" Movements Transport Control in Belfast, the British would not have crossed the border "until invited to do so by the Irish Government,"
    and it is not clear who would have had the operational authority over the British troops invited into the State by Éamon de Valera.
    The document added that most people in Ireland probably would have helped the British Army, but "there would have been a small disaffected element capable of considerable guerrilla activities against the British."[https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plan_W

    Markings to alert aircraft to neutral Ireland ("Éire") during World War II on Malin Head, County Donegal
     

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  8. Rex in OTZ

    Rex in OTZ Well-Known Member

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    I was watching Tora Tora Tora just now.
    The Philippene bound B-17's were caught up in the thick of it.
    And of course I wanted to know the rest of the story.
    The www.hawaiifreepress.com/ link below has some rare photos taked from one the B-17's during the attack.
    That was about the only shooting they could do was with cameras as they had no ammo aboard.

    The story of the B-17s that arrived over Hawaii during the Japanese attack has been told many times, but what happened to them?

    On December 7, 1941, 12 unarmed B-17s on their way to reinforce the Philippines arrived over Oahu to find Pearl Harbor and Hickam Field under attack.

    Six, led by Major Truman Landon, were from the 19th Bomb Group’s 38th Reconnaissance Squadron. Two of them, Landon’s 41-2413 and 41-2408 piloted by Lieutenant Karl Barthelmess, were brand-new B-17Es. The other four were obsolescent B-17Cs that would never see combat again. Following were six B-17Es from the 88th Reconnaissance Squadron, 7th Bomb Group, led by Captain Richard Carmichael in 41-2429.Carmichael decided to fly northeast, “just off the ground,” and try Bellows Field. At Bellows he encountered more chaos, and at Kaneohe and Wheeler too. With little choice left he turned into the wind, lowered the landing gear and flaps and, in a near stall, dragged the Flying Fortress onto the runway of the short auxiliary strip at Haleiwa. Lieutenant Harold Chaffin had landed there five minutes earlier in 41-2430. Lieutenants Robert Thacker in 41-2432, Harry Brandon in 41-2433 and David Rawls in 41-2434 braved Japanese and friendly fire to land at Hickam. Lieutenant Robert Ramsey, Brandon’s copilot, recalled “getting shooted at, muchly, by both countries.” Lieutenant Frank Bostrom in 41-2416 landed on a golf course at Kahuku. One B-17C was destroyed on landing and another damaged beyond repair, but all eight B-17Es and two B-17Cs were safely down by the time the Navy issued orders to “cease firing on B-17s attempting to land at Hickam.”


    http://www.historynet.com/pacific-tramps.htm

    https://militaryhistorynow.com/2016...es-how-the-b-17-made-a-splash-in-the-pacific/

    http://www.hawaiifreepress.com/Arti...Photos-from-Landing-B-17-Flying-Fortress.aspx

    With every reason to expect that the Japanese would be back, probably with an invasion force, the movement to the Philippines was postponed indefinitely. All 10 bombers were commandeered by the Hawaiian Air Force and put to work patrolling the surrounding waters. As a further precaution, Brig. Gen. Jacob Rudolph issued an order on December 10 to overpaint the B-17s to “blend” with “the area in which they were dispersed.” He later noted that “lack of proper colors prevents getting color desired,” but provided no further explanation. The work was hastily carried out, presumably by or under the supervision of the Hawaiian Air Depot Refinishing Section. There was a basic pattern and all the overpainted planes were similar, but no two were identical. The colors, chosen purely to protect the bombers on the ground, appear to have been shades of rust, sand, blue-gray, the earlier fast-fading olive drab and remnants of factory-applied dark olive drab. Data blocks were masked off and radio call numbers were added to the tails. Brigadier General Clarence Tinker endorsed the camouflage program when he arrived to take command of the Hawaiian Air Force on December 18, but just three days later two relatively junior officers, Navy Lt. Cmdr. Frank O’Beirne of Patrol Wing Two and the Hawaiian Air Force’s Major Ernest Moore, agreed to a compromise to aid with aircraft identification. Red-centered roundels would be displayed on both port and starboard upper and lower wings as well as the fuselage sides, with 13 alternate red and white stripes painted on the rudders. It’s not known to what degree the bolder, brighter markings contributed to the conclusion of the program, but by then the unique camouflage adorned at least 20 B-17Es, including the eight December 7 arrivals.As the threat of attack receded, the B-17s routinely patrolled the ocean around Hawaii. On the afternoon of January 3, 1942, 23rd Bomb Squadron commander Major LaVerne Saunders, flying 429, bombed a pair of submerged submarines without result and lost contact after a 40-minute pursuit. The following day Lieutenant Ralph Wanderer in 433 reported an enemy sub 600 miles out, but it escaped beneath the waves.

    After surviving the Pearl Harbor attack, B-17E 41-2433 gets some payback against a Kawanishi H6K4 on October 23, 1942.
     

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    Last edited: Dec 1, 2018
  9. manta

    manta Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Éamon de Valera did little to help during WW2. And shamefully treated returning Irish citizens that did fight for the allies during WW2.

    maxresdefault.jpg
     
    Last edited: Dec 1, 2018
  10. Rex in OTZ

    Rex in OTZ Well-Known Member

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    The planning for Operation K began in the weeks after the attack on Pearl Harbor, when the Imperial Japanese Navy high command considered how to take advantage of the capabilities of the long-range Kawanishi H8K flying boats. Plans to bomb California and Texas were being discussed, when the need for updated information regarding the repairs to US Navy facilities at Pearl Harbor took precedence. An assessment of the repairs to the docks, yards and airfields of Oahu would help the IJN staff to determine American ability to project power for months to come.
    Initial plans called for the use of five H8K aircraft. They would fly to French Frigate Shoals, the largest atoll in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands, to be refueled by submarines prior to taking off for Oahu. The raid was planned to coincide with the full moon to illuminate the Pearl Harbor target area, but the actual date of execution would depend on calm weather for refueling at French Frigate Shoals and clear skies over Pearl Harbor. If the first raid was successful, additional raids would be made In a repeat of events just prior to the 7 December attack, American codebreakers warned that the Japanese were preparing for reconnaissance and disruption raids, refueling at French Frigate Shoals, and again were largely ignored by their superiors.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Operation_K

    The codebreakers had reason to correctly interpret the Japanese intent. Edwin T. Layton's staff included Lieutenant Jasper Holmes, who, writing under the pen name Alec Hudson, had a story entitled Rendezvous published in an August, 1941, Saturday Evening Post. His fictitious story about refueling United States planes from submarines at a remote island for an air attack on a target 3000 miles away had been withheld from publication for a year until the author convinced United States Navy censors the techniques described were known to other navies.

    https://www.stripes.com/news/japan-...-hawaii-failed-in-more-ways-than-one-1.514386
     

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    Last edited: Dec 1, 2018
  11. Rex in OTZ

    Rex in OTZ Well-Known Member

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    Despite all of the scorn and mockery, Semple was still defiant and with plenty of justification. Under Robert Semple the almost defenseless islanders of New Zealand had developed their own armored force and demonstrated the resolve to fight and to resist. Semple, in a political exchange in September 1943, said:

    “When we came into office we had insufficient strength to protect a currant bun from the attack of a blowfly. But if the Japs could be killed with wheelbarrows we could have stoushed them – we had plenty of barrows…two years before the war we quietly slipped machines to Fiji and Tonga and built aerodromes there secretly… it was plain as the day that the Japs would strike south through the back door to Singapore… [island hopping] …to New Zealand..what stopped them this way?”
    A retort from the floor mocked Semple saying:
    “Probably your tanks, Bob”
    to which he responded
    “If that is a cheap sneer, you keep it. I had the vision to try and create something while a lot of others were just sniveling” [Laughter and applause to this response is recorded]

    This was not the response of a man in any way ashamed or embarrassed but rather proud in what he and the PWD achieved.
    http://www.tanks-encyclopedia.com/ww2/NewZealand/Bob_Semple_Tank.php

    Postwar commentators may also continue to sneer at this ungainly machine, but the PWD and Semple had laid down a marker, a line in the sand that New Zealand would defend itself no matter what. Semple, the fighter, the anti-authoritarian, would not give up to the defence of his home to the dictatorship of Japan no matter what.

    Robert Semple (with cane) accompanied by unidentified staff officer inspecting the very tall sides of the PWD tank. Note this photo shows the back of the vehicle and clearly shows the corrugated armor on the right-hand side extending all the way up the side
     

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  12. manta

    manta Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Designed and built in Belfast during WW2. Short-stirling-bomber-02.png


    s16-Short-Sunderland-960x534.jpg
     
  13. Rex in OTZ

    Rex in OTZ Well-Known Member

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    Tizard Mission
    After the Fall of France, it was realised in Great Britain that the manufacturing capabilities of the United States were vital to success in the war; thus, although America was not yet a belligerent, Prime Minister Winston Churchill directed that the technology secrets of Great Britain be shared in exchange for the needed capabilities. In the summer of 1940, the Tizard Missionvisited the United States. The cavity magnetron was demonstrated to Americans at RCA, Bell Labs, etc. It was 100 times more powerful than anything they had seen.
    Bell Labs was able to duplicate the performance, and the Radiation Laboratory at MIT was established to develop microwave radars. It was later described as "The most valuable cargo ever brought to our shores".

    The Tizard Mission, officially the British Technical and Scientific Mission, was a British delegation that visited the United States during the Second World War in order to obtain the industrial resources to exploit the military potential of the research and development (R&D) work completed by the UK up to the beginning of World War II, but that Britain itself could not exploit due to the immediate requirements of war-related production. It received its popular name from the program's instigator, Henry Tizard. Tizard was a British scientist and chairman of the Aeronautical Research Committee, which had propelled the development of radar.
     
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  14. Rex in OTZ

    Rex in OTZ Well-Known Member

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    on December 14, 1941, seven days after the attack on Pearl Harbor, when the Imperial Japanese Navy (IJN) ordered a number of submarines to the west coast of the United States to attack shipping.The Imperial General Headquarters issued an expanded set of orders over the head of the IJN to also initiate attacks against the continental mainland, i.e., shell and/or bomb the U.S. West Coast. To meet the immediacy of those orders --- with no traditional warships remotely in the pipeline or close by --- Vice Admiral Shimizu issued a detailed order for the submarines already dispatched to the area to comply. Those submarines, all aircraft equipped, were the I-9, I-10, I-15, I-17, I-19, I-21, I-23, I-25 and I-26. Shimizu's orders were for each of the submarines to fire 30 shells on Christmas night, December 25, 1941, into high profile targets along the Pacific coast. To underscore the level of importance the Japanese high command put into the successful execution of the plan, one of the submarines, the I-9, even carried a Rear Admiral.

    http://the-wanderling.com/radar-dilemma.html
     
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  15. Rex in OTZ

    Rex in OTZ Well-Known Member

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    LA PALMA SECRET BASE
    "They worked their way from Mexico City to Acacoyagua in Chiapas state and into the small village of Acapetahua six kilometers away, then, with the help of a sleeper agent long passing as a local, slipped out into estuaries leading toward the Pacific. Part way down they came upon what they had been told existed, a rudimentary yet seemingly effective Japanese operated facility used as submarine base, hidden and hewed out of the side of the jungle apparently designed as a resupply and refuelling depot."
    The secret submarine base alluded to in the above quote was reportedly a World War II Japanese submarine refuelling and resupply depot hidden in the estuaries on the Pacific side of Mexico in the state of Chiapas, so far south it was only about 60 miles north of the Guatemalan border. The existence of the secret base, which originally never had a name and never very high up on the spectrum of things, is now called by some as La Palma.

    http://the-wanderling.com/secret_base.html
     
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  16. RJF22553

    RJF22553 Well-Known Member

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    Which led to the blockbuster movie "1941". They never had a chance against John Belushi!:)
     
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  17. RJF22553

    RJF22553 Well-Known Member

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    Rex, my Dad commanded a company in the 560th Signal Aircraft Warning Battalion (Separate) in Tunisia during WW-II. Fresh out of RADAR school at MIT, he signed into Camp Drew, FL as a 1LT and reported in.
    Per Dad's memoirs:

    I was ordered to report to a Captain Jay at "C" Stage of the Staging Area of 
    Drew Field. The Staging Area was the area where units were assembled and made their final preparations before movement to the Port of Embarkation (POE). I reported to Capt. Jay, and the conversion went something like this:

    Me: "Lt. Foster reporting as ordered, sir."
    Capt. Jay: "Oh, yes, Lt. Foster. I heard you were coming. You are now 
    Commanding Officer of Co.E, 560th Signal Aircraft Warning Battalion. Do you 
    have any questions?"

    Me: "Yes, sir. Where are the other Officers of Company E?"
    Capt. Jay: "No other Officers have been assigned as yet."

    Me: "Where are the enlisted men?"
    Capt. Jay: "No enlisted men have been assigned as yet."

    Me: "Where are the company barracks?"
    Capt. Jay: "A barracks area has not been assigned as yet."

    Me: "Where is the company equipment?"
    Capt. Jay: "The company equipment has not been issued yet."

    Me: "Captain Jay, if I understand you correctly, I am Commanding Officer of 
    Company E, 560th Signal Aircraft Warning Battalion. Company E has no other 
    officers, no enlisted men, no barracks, and no equipment. Just me. Is that 
    correct?"
    Capt. Jay: "That is substantially correct."

    Me: "Sir, can you tell me anything about my new command?"
    Capt. Jay: "Well, yes. Your company is scheduled to depart for overseas in 
    ten days. BE READY!"

    I saluted and left.

     
    Last edited: Jan 10, 2019
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  18. jigs-n-fixture

    jigs-n-fixture Well-Known Member Lifetime Supporter

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    Now I’ll be up all night rewatching it.