More WW II now and then excellent!

Discussion in 'History' started by boatme98, Apr 25, 2018.

  1. SGWGunsmith

    SGWGunsmith Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Back in the day, I was buying Mauser '98 rifles, six in a case, at a time, for $60.00 each plus shipping. I don't know where this supplier got those rifles, but unlike others that I've seen, the bottom metal, which was captured in the wood stock, was pristine and didn't have any pits or rust that was common on other '98 rifles that I'd seen. Most all these rifles were made in Czechoslovakia and stamped VZ 24, BRNO or were identified on the left side with rolled stamping denoting made in Czechoslovakia. Vintage of these rifles were all around 1939, because Germany wasn't allowed to manufacture any weapons of war under the Versailles Treaty.
    These days, the sheriff is correct, many collectors want original WWII guns, unaltered.
     
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  2. Rex in OTZ

    Rex in OTZ Well-Known Member

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    The probibility of most folks of hearing of the Battle of Ramree Island is incredibly small due to it not being one of the Second World War’s most significant skirmishes,
    Secondly it was mainly a British and Commonwealth operation that many consider it one of the oddest and morbid stories in the history of WW2.

    During World War II, Ramree Island off the coast of Burma was the site of a number of military battles, but the truly terrifying action only began after the military maneuvers ended.
    the most terrible massacre by animals to this day. It was the bloodiest massacre of World War II that was not caused by humans.

    On January 26, 1945, British troops made their way to Ramree Island so that they could establish a new airbase. However, first they had to drive off the Japanese invasion force which had already claimed the island. After a bloody but successful campaign against the Japanese, the British soldiers managed to drive nearly 1,000 enemy combatants into the dense mangrove swamp that covered some ten miles of Ramree. While this may have seemed a fine opportunity to slip into the wilderness and regroup, most of the Japanese soldiers would never be heard from again.


    There is a long history of saltwater crocodiles attacking humans who wander into their habitats, and unfortunately for a small number of retreating Japanese soldiers managed to survive the Ramree swamps.


    It was after this that one of the oddest incidents in the history of warfare occurred.

    The defeated Japanese soldiers ignored all appeals by the British for their surrender, and instead abandoned their base and entered the swamp. Many of the Japanese troops succumbed to tropical diseases carried by swarms of mosquitoes, as well as the various poisonous spiders, snakes and scorpions found in the marsh.

    Another additional problem for the Japanese troops was the lack of drinking water and constant threat of starvation. Despite these numerous hazards, one danger stood out as the greatest.

    One night the British soldiers reported hearing panicked screams and gunfire emanating from within the darkness of the swamp. They didn’t know what exactly caused the shouts of terror they heard, but only that the Japanese troops were being ravaged by some evil menace.

    Unfortunately for the Imperial Japanese Army, the mangrove swamps of Ramree Island are home to an unknown amount of the largest reptilian predator in the world, the saltwater crocodile.

    The reptiles can grow up to 20 feet long and weigh 2,000 pounds, but even a midsize saltwater crocodile could easily kill a full-grown adult human, with many being known to eat animals as vast as Indian water buffalo. The soldiers were viciou
    sly and mercilessly attacked by the crocodiles.

    https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.th...-battle-of-ramree-island-of-world-war-ii/amp/

    https://factslegend.org/the-ramree-island-crocodile-massacre-a-horrific-carnage/

    “A Cacophony Of Hell”: The Story Of The Ramree Island Crocodile Massacre
    https://allthatsinteresting.com/ramree-island
     

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    Last edited: Oct 3, 2018
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  3. SGWGunsmith

    SGWGunsmith Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Wow! They got was was coming to 'em.
     
  4. Chainfire

    Chainfire Well-Known Member Supporter

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    If you want an exciting read that sounds like fiction, read Thunder Below
    By Eugene Flukey. Flukey was a MOH winner and, except for an enemy in Washington, would have won it twice. His was the only submarine to "sink" a moving train full of Japanese troops and the first sub to fire missiles. He later rose in rank to Admiral and only recently died. The man was a "hero" as the term used to be used......
     
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  5. Rex in OTZ

    Rex in OTZ Well-Known Member

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    louis-curdes.jpg The only USAAC pilot to have shot down his Army nurse girlfriend
    and future wife.
    Captain Louis Curdes was awarded his second Distinguished Flying Cross for shooting down an American C-47?
    He became one of three American pilots credited with shooting down an enemy plane from three Axis nations and the only American decorated for shooting down an American plane.

    On February 10, 1945, Captain Louis Curdes took off from Mangaldan Airfield in the Philippines leading a flight of four P-51s on a reconnaissance mission to the tip of Taiwan looking for a Japanese airfield. They found nothing in Taiwan but decided to fly over Batan Island, one of the northernmost Philippine islands close to Taiwan. The four P-51’s broke up into pairs. Curdes and his wingman, Lieutenant Schmidtke flew over the northern half, while the other two pilots, Lieutenants Scalley and La Croix looked over the southern part of the island. The northern half had nothing of interest but Lt. Scalley called on the radio that they found something and requested immediate assistance. The flight of four found themselves engaged in fighters and anti-aircraft fire.

    The four Mustangs claimed 2 Japanese planes in the air and 3 more on the ground. Japanese Anti-aircraft fire was intense. Lieutenant La Croix was hit over the target and bailed out into the sea. Curdes ordered Lieutenant Scalley to fly back to Mangaldan to see if there was a PBY Catalina available for rescue. He then told Lieutenant Schmidtke to fly to 15,000 feet and give out a mayday and cover him.

    Curdes made another strafing run on the Japanese airfield to discourage them from going after La Croix in the water.

    In the distance he saw an American C-47 transport plane trying to land on the Japanese airfield. At first Curdes thought it was a Japanese copy of the C-47 but when he got close to it he could see it had American markings. Curdes tried to contact the plane on the radio, he shot across its nose and flew in front of it to ruin its landing approach, but nothing he did made the C-47 change course. Curdes did not want to see an American plane land on a Japanese field, especially one that had just been attacked. Curdes lined his P-51 behind the C-47 and carefully shot out both of its engines forcing the pilot to ditch in the sea. The C-47 landed close to La Croix in the water, and Curdes saw twelve people climbing into a raft. He saw they were all Americans and that two women were with them. Curdes dropped a note from 50 feet saying “For God’s sake, keep away from the shore. Japs there”. La Croix paddled over to the survivors and tied their rafts together. As night approached with no rescue airplane in sight, Curdes decided the people in the water would be safe until daylight and returned to base.

    Before daybreak the next day, Curdes and his wingman took off and returned to the rafts. They guarded them from the air until a PBY Catalina arrived. Curdes learned that the C-47 pilot had gotten lost in bad weather. The pilot’s radio had gone out and his fuel gauge was empty when he spotted the airfield on Batan Island. When looking over the list of survivors from the C-47, Curdes was shocked to see the name of a nurse he had a date with in Lingayen the night before he shot down the C-47. He exclaimed “Jeepers, seven 109’s and a Macchi in North Africa, one Japanese and one Yank in the Pacific and to top it, I have to go and shoot down the girlfriend(Svetlana Valeria Shostakovich Brownell)”.

    For shooting down an American C-47, Captain Louis Curdes was awarded his second Distinguished Flying Cross. He became one of three American pilots credited with shooting down an enemy plane from three Axis nations and the only American decorated for shooting down an American plane. He later married the nurse and can also claim to be only pilot to have shot down his girlfriend and future wife in aerial combat

    http://ww2awartobewon.com/wwii-articles/louis-curdes-shot-american-plane/

    https://www.notestream.com/streams/5548027025f54/
     
    Last edited: Sep 15, 2019
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  6. sheepdawg

    sheepdawg Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Further info, I emailed this picture to my 80 year old cousin Ilse. During the 30s through and beyond the war the whole family owned and lived together in an apartment complex in Hannover, Germany. Ilse was the daughter of one of my father's older brothers. She saw my father pretty much everyday except when he was in the Wehrmacht or when he was a POW. She says that prisoner is my father, no doubt in her mind. Small world, unbelievable luck.
     
  7. Rex in OTZ

    Rex in OTZ Well-Known Member

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    Slightly before WW2.
    15 May1941 Distinguished Flying Crosses for 2
    15 May 1941 A most unusual accident occurred near San Diego, California. USMC Second Lieutenant Walter A. Osipoff and 11 enlisted men of Company A were making a practice jump over Kearney Mesa.
    At 9:30 in the morning on May 15, 1941, Some the public stood in a crowd on a San Diego sidewalk, staring transfixed at the sky. We watched an R2D-1 transport circling, trailing a queer whirligig below its tail. The airplane, the Navy version of the Douglas DC-2, was marked “U.S. Marines.” The whirligig was Marine parachutist Second Lieutenant Walter Osipoff. The drama that was about to unfold would be the talk of the town for weeks.
    Everyone else had exited the plane and he threw out a cargo pack, which possibly tangled in his static line. His parachute opened prematurely while he was still in the door of the plane; it billowed outside the aircraft and pulled him out, but the canopy and suspension lines tangled in the bundle of static lines streaming beside the transport. For a moment the cargo pack, Osipoff and his partially opened parachute were all suspended from the cable that held the static lines. Under this combined load the bracket holding one end of the cable gave way and it streamed out the door. The cargo pack fell away, but Osipoff and his parachute remained dangling from the cable and static lines, suspended behind the plane's tail. The accident also mined his reserve chute and ripped away the part of his harness attached to his chest. He ended up being dragged through the air feet-first, held only by the leg straps.The crew of the plane attempted to pull him in but could not do so. Since the transport had no radio communications, the pilot flew it over the field at North Island to attract attention.
    On the ground at Naval Air Station North Island, Marine lieutenant and test pilot William Lowrey had seen what was happening above. He yelled to Aviation Chief Machinist's Mate John McCants to quickly fuel a Curtiss SOC biplane, called the control tower by telephone for clearance (the biplane, like the R2D-1 from Osipoff dangled, had no radio), and then took off with McCants in the rear cockpit.
    When the two men caught up with the transport plane, Lowrey matched its speed as best he could and slowly inched up on Osipoff — but it wasn't working. Johnson was having trouble holding the transport steady and Osipoff was twice hit by the biplane's wing. McCants later said he could see blood dripping off of Osipoff's helmet and knew the jumpmaster had been badly hurt.
    Johnson moved up to 3,000 feet, where he found more stable air, and the transport evened out. By this point, the larger plane had enough fuel left for only ten minutes.
    Again, Lowrey approached the dangling Osipoff.
    McCants finally succeeded in getting him head first into the plane, though his legs dangled outside.
    Before McCants could cut the shroud lines, bumpy air pushed the biplane up and its propeller did the job (chopping off 12 inches of the tail cone of the transport in the process). Lowery landed his aircraft as McCants maintained his tenuous grip on the Marine parachutist. Osipoff had been hanging beneath the transport for thirty-three minutes. Among his other injuries, he had suffered a fractured vertebra is his back that would keep him in a body cast for the next three months. but fully recovered and returned to jump status. He went on to win a Bronze Star in World War II and ended the war as a lieutenant colonel.
    Lowery and McCants received Distinguished Flying Crosses for their successful rescue.

    https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.we...ratrooper-was-rescued-by-open-top-biplane/amp

    https://www.airspacemag.com/military-aviation/above-amp-beyond-man-overboard-51031927/
     

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  8. Rex in OTZ

    Rex in OTZ Well-Known Member

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    Brazilian Expeditionary Force -
    was a force about 25,700 men and women arranged by the Army and Air Force to fight alongside the Allied forces in the Mediterranean Theatre of World War II.
    Brazil was the only South American country to send troops to fight in the Second World War.
    During the eight months of the Italian campaign, the Brazilian Expeditionary Force managed to take 20,573 Axis prisoners, including two generals, 892 officers and 19,679 other ranks.
    During the War, Brazil lost 948 of its own men killed in action across all three services.

    http://www.defenseforces.com/2018/03/28/brazilian-air-force-1st-fighter-group-in-the-world-war-ii/


    The 1st Brazilian Fighter Group accomplished 445 missions, with a total of 2,546 flights and 5,465 hours of flight on active service. It destroyed 1,304 motor-vehicles, 13 railway waggons, 8 armoured cars, 25 railway and highway bridges and 31 fuel tanks and munition depots.
     

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  9. Rex in OTZ

    Rex in OTZ Well-Known Member

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    Escuadrón Aéreo de Pelea 201



    The Mexican Expeditionary Air Force(Spanish: Fuerza Aérea Expedicionaria Mexicana, FAEM) was a military aviation unit which represented Mexico on the Allied side during World War II. It is notable as the only Mexican military unit ever to fight outside Mexico itself.
    Although most Americancountries eventually entered the war on the Allies' side, Mexico and Brazil were the only Latin American nations that sent troops to fight overseas during World War II.
    At a conference in Rio de Janeiro of Latin American foreign ministers in January of 1942, the Mexican delegation convinced many other countries to follow suit and break ties with the Axis powers.
    Mexico saw immediate rewards for its support. US capital flowed into Mexico, building factories for wartime needs. The US purchased Mexican oil and sent technicians to quickly build up Mexican mining operations for much-needed metals like mercury, zinc, copper and more. The Mexican armed forces were built up with US weapons and training. Loans were made to stabilize and boost industry and security.

    On 29 December 1944, Mexico's Senate authorized troops to be sent into combat.
    Founded by order 8606 of the Dirección de Aeronáutica of the Secretariat of National Defense, the unit was officially made part of the Mexican Army on 1 January 1945. Its structure was organised as Command (Mando), Command Group (Grupo de Comando),
    Escuadrón 201 and Reinforcement Group (Grupo de Reemplazos), to be consistent with the structure of a U.S. fighter squadron, though the unit flew with its own markings and remained under Mexican command—Colonel P.A. Antonio Cárdenas Rodríguez (1905–1969) was appointed its commander.
    When the 201st deployed, no provision for replacement pilots had been made and the pilot losses incurred in the Philippines hampered its effectiveness. Mexican replacement pilots were rushed through familiarization training in the United States, and two more pilots died in flight accidents in Florida. When the 58th Fighter Group left the Philippines for Okinawa on July 10, the Mexicans stayed behind. They flew their last combat mission as a full squadron on August 26, escorting a convoy north of the Philippines. Not only did the pilots get into combat, but also the ground personnel encountered Japanese troops, having some fire-fights and capturing a number of enemy troops as well. The 201st Mexican Squadron was given credit for putting out of action about 30,000 Japanese troops and the destruction of enemy held-buildings, vehicles, tanks, anti-aircraft guns, machine guns emplacements and ammunition depots.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/201st_Fighter_Squadron_(Mexico)

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mexican_Expeditionary_Air_Force

    https://www.af.mil/News/Article-Display/Article/117449/museum-remembers-aztec-eagles/
     

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  10. Rex in OTZ

    Rex in OTZ Well-Known Member

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    Mexicans and Mexican-Americans in US military during WW2.
    There are not reliable data about the number of chicanos and mexicans in the army. Official accounts estimate between 250 000 and 500 000 , and it is believed that from these, between 15 000 and 30 000 were mexican citizens, the rest were mexican-americans.

    https://www.quora.com/How-many-Mexicans-fought-in-the-Second-World-War

    Staff Sergeant Marcario García, Medal of Honor recipient
    Staff Sergeant Marcario García also known as Macario García (January 20, 1920 – December 24, 1972) was the first Mexican immigrant to receive the Medal of Honor, the United States' highest military decoration. He received the award for his heroic actions (europe) as a soldier during World War II.

    Master Sergeant José M. López, Medal of Honor
    José Mendoza López (July 10, 1910 – May 16, 2005) was a Mexican-born United States Army soldier who was awarded the United States' highest military decoration for valor in combat — the Medal of Honor — for his heroic actions during the Battle of the Bulge, in which he single-handedly repulsed a German infantry attack, killing at least 100 enemy troops.
    (WW2 and Korea)
    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marcario_García
    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/José_M._López
     

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  11. Rex in OTZ

    Rex in OTZ Well-Known Member

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    Pacific Coast Militia Rangers (PCMR)
    Formed on March 3, 1942, the Pacific Coast Militia Rangers were volunteers who patrolled, performed military surveillance, and provided local defence of the coastline of British Columbia and in Yukon against the wartime threat of a possible Japanese invasion. At their height, the Pacific Coast Militia Rangers consisted of 15,000 volunteers in 138 companies under three major patrol areas, which were Vancouver Island, the lower Fraser Valley and the Bridge River area. Some of the principal officers of the PCMR were Lieutenant-Colonel C.W. Peck, Lieutenant-Colonel A.L. Coote and Major H. Ashby. The Pacific Coast Militia Rangers were disbanded on September 30, 1945.At the outset of the Second World War, the rest of the Canadian Army was equipping with Enfield rifles, Bren guns, Webley revolvers, and Browning-Inglis Hi Power pistols and Canadian production of these weapons was badly needed for overseas service. The Pacific Coast Militia Rangers thus had to make do with what was readily available, often patrolling with their own rifles and shotguns. This led Canadian purchasing agents to look to American sources for rifles. At the time [when?] the most popular style of rifle in the North American West was the .30WCF (.30-30 calibre) lever action. As such, purchasers considered that the Winchester 1894 and Marlin 36 would be easy for the PCMR members to use, as they more than likely had experience with the type already.
    As a stop-gap until Enfield Rifles became available in numbers for issue, some 3000 Winchesters and an estimated 1800 Marlins were promptly acquired direct from North Haven (likely all these firms had on hand). Guns were marked with the canadian military stamp and issued as needed to senior members of the companies, but stocks of .30-30 ammunition was so limited that only six rounds were issued with the rifle while the rest was locked up in the company's armoury, typically in the vault of the local bank.

    https://laststandonzombieisland.com/tag/pacific-coast-militia-rangers/

    https://www.thefirearmblog.com/blog/2014/09/04/winchester-94-wwii/amp/

    http://www.nambuworld.com/pcmr.htm

    http://www.watchersofthenorth.com/home/history-rangers
     

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    Last edited: Oct 28, 2018
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  12. Rex in OTZ

    Rex in OTZ Well-Known Member

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    The sinking of U-176
    11 commercial ships sunk (53,307 GRT)
    U-176 sailed for her third and final patrol on 6 April 1943 from Lorient, sailing across the Atlantic and into the Caribbean Sea.
    On 13 May 1943, U-176 attacked Convoy NC 18 only five miles off the northern coast of Cuba, sinking the 2,249 ton American tanker Nickeliner, which was loaded with 3,400 tons of ammonia water, and the 1,983 ton Cuban molasses tanker Mambí.
    On 15 May, the Cuban merchant ship Camagüey, and the Honduran Hanks, both loaded with sugar, sailed from Sagua La Grande, bound for Havana, escorted by the Cuban submarine chasers CS-11, CS-12, and CS-13.
    At 17:15 hours, a U.S. Navy Kingfisher aircraft from squadron VS-62 operating from Cuba spotted U-176 at 23° 21′N 80°18′W and dropped a smoke float to mark her position about one and a half miles astern of the convoy. CS-13 located the U-boat with her sonar, attacked with depth charges and sank U-176.
    CS-13 was commanded by the Cuban Navy's Alférez de Fragata, Mario Ramirez Delgado commanding, the only Cuban national to sink a U-boat during World War II. In 1946, Delgado, promoted to Lieutenant, was awarded the Orden del Mérito Naval con Distantivo Rojo (Meritorious Naval Service Order with Red Badge). Rear Admiral Samuel E. Morison, official historian of the US Navy, recognized his success in his work History of United States Naval Operations in World War II, where he also praised the ability and efficiency of this particular Cuban seamen.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/German_submarine_U-176
     

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  13. manta

    manta Well-Known Member Supporter

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    A soldier from Northern Ireland was one of the highest decorated British soldiers during WW2. He was a controversial figure well known for his explosive temper, especially after a few drinks. But he was the right man at the right time and place, notice the famous cap badge. PS Some bad language in the link.
    Badass of the Week: Paddy Mayne List of Gallantry / Campaign Medals & Awards


    2484339_orig.jpg images.jpe
     
  14. Rex in OTZ

    Rex in OTZ Well-Known Member

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    1941-1942 U.S. Enlisted Military Base Pay Charts

    The United States military enlisted base pay scales effective August 1, 1941 through May 31, 1942 for active components of the Navy, Marine Corps, Army, and Coast Guard.

    The United States officially entered World War II on December 8, 1941, the day after Japan bombed Pearl Harbor, Hawaii.

    The pay rates are monthly, US dollar.

    1941-1942 Enlisted Military Base Pay Chart

    https://www.navycs.com/charts/1922-officer-pay-chart.html

    https://www.navycs.com/charts/1941-military-pay-chart.html

    https://www.navycs.com/charts/1942-military-pay-chart.html

    Grade. Years of service.
    4th: less than 3 years. $78 a month

    Note 1: The "E" and "O" pay grades did not come until the approval of the Career Compensation Act of 1949; however, for comparison purposes, the 1st Grade, is the same as today's E-7; 7th Grade is the same as E-1.

    $78 in 1941 equals $1,363.75 in 2018.

    https://www.saving.org/inflation/inflation.php?amount=78
     
    Last edited: Oct 29, 2018
  15. Rex in OTZ

    Rex in OTZ Well-Known Member

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    The plucky soldier that fought the communists in 2 different WW2 armies.
    Lauri Allan Törni (28 May 1919 – 18 October 1965), later known as Larry Thorne, was a Finnish–American soldier who fought under three flags: Finnish, and later German when he fought the Soviets in World War II, and American (where he was known as Larry Thorne) when he served in US Army Special Forces in the Vietnam War. Törni died in a helicopter crash during the Vietnam War.

    Lauri Allan Törni, also known as Larry Thorne, was a Finnish war hero who fought for Finland, United States, and Germany. He led an infantry company as a Finnish Army captain in fighting the Soviet Union in the Winter War, a military conflict that began following the Soviet invasion of Finland. He also fought in such capacity in the Continuation Wars, a conflict fought against the Soviet Union by co-belligerents Finland and Nazi Germany during the Second World War. Following the Second World War he went to the US where he joined the United States Army Special Forces and fought in the Vietnam War. Considered a national hero of Finland, this war veteran lost his life in the Vietnam War. He received several military awards and decorations for his valor and contributions in the wars. These include Finnish decoration Mannerheim Cross; German decoration Iron Cross 2nd Class; and United States Army decorations and medals Legion of Merit, Distinguished Flying Cross, Bronze Star and Purple Heart among others.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lauri_Törni

    http://taskforceomegainc.org/t375.htm
     

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  16. Rex in OTZ

    Rex in OTZ Well-Known Member

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    To avoid using the German sounding name ‘hamburger’ during World War II, Americans used the name ‘Liberty Steak.’
     

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  17. Rex in OTZ

    Rex in OTZ Well-Known Member

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    William Patrick "Willy" Stuart-Houston(né Hitler; 12 March 1911 – 14 July 1987) was the Irish-German nephew of Adolf Hitler. He was born to Adolf's half-brother, Alois Hitler, Jr. and his Irish wife, Bridget Dowling, in Liverpool, England. William Hitler later moved to Germany, but subsequently immigrated to the United States, where he served in the United States Navy in World War II (1944-1947). He eventually received American citizenship.

    William left Germany in January 1939 and visited the United States with his mother on a lecture tour[5] at the invitation of publisher William Randolph Hearst. He and his mother were stranded in the U.S. when World War IIbroke out. After making a special request to President Franklin D. Roosevelt, William was eventually cleared to join the United States Navy in 1944, and moved to Sunnyside, Queensin New York.
    William Patrick Hitler was drafted into the United States Navy during World War II as a Pharmacist's Mate (a designation later changed to Hospital Corpsman) until he was discharged in 1947. On reporting for duty, the induction officer asked his name. "Hitler," he said. "Glad to see you Hitler," the officer replied, "My name's Hess." He was wounded in action during the war and awarded the Purple Heart.
     

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  18. Rex in OTZ

    Rex in OTZ Well-Known Member

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    How the Royal Navy submarine HMS Graph was inducted into the Royal Navy aka. Patrol Bomber Captures U-Boat?
    On August 27, 1941, U-boat U-570, captained by Kapitanleutnant Hans-Joachim Rahmlow, surfaced off the coast of Iceland. Almost immediately, it was spotted by James Thompson, the acting leader of a British squadron based in Iceland who was on an anti-submarine patrol. Immediately, Rahmlow ordered a crash dive, but it was too late. Thompson’s Hudson bomber dropped four depth charges, one of which dealt a critical blow to U-570, knocking out the lighting system.

    Being inexperienced in U-boats and commanding an inexperienced crew, Rahmlow panicked and surfaced again, fearing the release of deadly chlorine gas. When a number of the crew came up on deck, Thompson attacked the U-boat with the plane’s machine guns. The crew soon realized the futility of fighting the aircraft in rough seas and surrendered. Amazed, Thompson flew in for a closer look, but no other attempt was made by the crew to defend their vessel, fearing more depth charge attacks. Thompson then radioed for more planes and to alert the Navy to collect the U-boat.

    In the time it took for the Royal Navy armed trawler to arrive, the U-boat crew destroyed the code books and Enigma machines on board. U-570 was then towed back to Iceland and beached to prevent it from sinking. The boat was repaired, and it was discovered that there was no evidence of chlorine gas. A more experienced crew would probably have escaped. U-570 was then placed into service with the Royal Navy as HMS Graph. The surrender of U-570 remains the only time a submarine has surrendered to an aircraft.
     

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  19. Rex in OTZ

    Rex in OTZ Well-Known Member

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    Allies’ daring Trojan horse attack on German-controlled French port of Saint-Nazaire was ‘greatest raid of all’

    The St. Nazaire Raid
    The German battleship Bismarck had been sunk by the Royal Navy in 1941, but that wasn’t the end of its threat—the Bismarck had a sister ship called the Tirpitz. To neutralize the threat, the British planned a raid on the French dry dock of St. Nazaire, the only dock on the Atlantic coast which could hold the Tirpitz. Destroying the docks called for an unorthodox plan—an old US Navy destroyer, HMS Campbeltown, would have to be packed with explosives and rammed into the dock gates. Then, commandos would blow up the other buildings, including the U-boat pens.
    HMS Campbeltown was stripped of all nonessential equipment to save room and weight for explosives, and two of her four funnels were removed so she bore a better resemblance to a German frigate. Extra steel was plated on at the front to protect the commandos on board. On March 26, 1942, the flotilla—made up of two destroyers, 16 motor launches, and HMS Campbeltown—set off from Falmouth, Cornwall, reaching the dock on March 28. Flying the German naval ensign, HMS Campbeltown accelerated to full speed on the river leading to the docks. With the gates in sight, the Royal Navy flag was raised, and seven minutes later, the destroyer hit the gates and the commandos sprang into action.
    Unfortunately, the commandos on board the motor launches didn’t fare well. Of the 265 who landed, only five made it back to England. The rest were killed or captured after many of the motor launches were damaged or destroyed. At 10:35 AM on the March 29, HMS Campbeltownexploded, killing 250 Germans on board and destroying the docks, rendering them out of service for six years. Five Victoria crosses were awarded in the aftermath, and even today, it is regarded as the greatest military raid of all time.
    https://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/n...l/news-story/d3203571af4365f0b4478e757363e2cc
     

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