More WW II now and then excellent!

Discussion in 'History' started by boatme98, Apr 25, 2018.

  1. Rex in OTZ

    Rex in OTZ Well-Known Member

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    I'm just learning about the story of Hermann Goering’s American born nephew Werner Goering who at age 19 was a captain of a USAAF B-17 in the 8th Air Force. He did a full combat tour and then volunteered for a second tour, was a Squadron Leader, Pathfinder, and was awarded the DFC.

    https://www.airspacemag.com/daily-planet/gorings-nephew-123292594/
    http://www.303rdbg.com/358goering.html

    Werner g. Goering

    Was Hermann Göring’s nephew a B-17 commander with the U.S. Army Air Forces during World War II
    After an FBI investigation, Werner was allowed to serve—under one condition, which was kept hidden from him. His co-pilot, First Lieutenant Jack Rencher, had orders to kill Werner should the B-17 be forced to land in Europe. Under no circumstances could Werner be captured alive, for fear that he would be used for propaganda purposes by the Nazis. Capt Werner G. Goering (P) - Was the nephew of Reichsmarschall Hermann Goering Commander in Chief of the Nazi German Luftwaffe. Capt Goering completed 48 credited combat missions on 28 Jan 1945 (Mission 308) and was promoted to Captain while a Lead Crew Pilot 1Lt Jack P. Rencher (P) - Was an experienced B-17 Pilot before being assigned to the 1Lt Goering Crew. Had over 1,000 B-17 Pilot hours flying at the Yuma AFB, Az. Gunnery school. While at Yuma AFB, AZ was selected for a volunteer assignment as the Werner G. Goering crew Co-Pilot after an extensive USAAF investigation to find a Pilot uniquely qualified to fly as an armed 1Lt Goering CoPilot over Nazi Germany and to make sure that he wouldn't land in German territory while on a combat mission. Was upgraded from CoPilot to Pilot on orders dated 22 November 1944 and completed five missions (277, 286, 287, 289, 290) as a First Pilot. Flew on 25 missions as the 1Lt Goering Crew CoPilot (Goering missions 232 through 275 and 279 and 281) and five credited missions with other Pilots (231, 251, 254, 258, 288 - when 1Lt Goering stood down). Completed his 35 mission combat tour on 24 Dec 1944 (Mission 290). USAAF Captain Werner Goering certainly thought he was related to the infamous Commander-in-Chief of the Luftwaffe. The American Goering was born in Salt Lake City, Utah, in 1923, shortly after his family emigrated from Germany. His father, Karl, often boasted to the local German-American community and to his family that his younger brother Hermann was a World War I fighter ace and adviser to Adolf Hitler.

    In the course of writing his book, Frater discovered that Hermann Göring and Werner Goering were not related after all. It seems that Karl Goering’s kinship claims had been nothing more than a way to gain recognition in Salt Lake City’s German community, and he would never know that his false claims almost cost his son his life. When Frater learned that there was no relation, he immediately called Werner. “His response was calm, muted, and, I believe, profoundly grateful,” he recalls
     

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  2. Hookeye

    Hookeye Well-Known Member

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  3. Rex in OTZ

    Rex in OTZ Well-Known Member

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    Lauri Allan Törni, later known as Larry Thorne, was a Finnish soldier who fought under three flags: Finnish, and later German when he fought the Soviets in World War II, and American when he served in US Army Special Forces in the Vietnam War.


    Rank: Captain (Finland); Hauptsturmführer (Germany); Major (USA)

    Service/branch: Finnish Army; Waffen SS; United States Army

    Battles/wars: World War II
    Winter War
    Continuation War
    Eastern Front
    Vietnam War
    Operation Shining Brass

    Years of service: 1938–1944 (Finnish Army); 1945 (Waffen SS); 1954–1965 (U.S. Army)

    Awards
    Mannerheim Cross
    Iron Cross 2nd Class[2ea]
    Legion of Merit
    Distinguished Flying Cross
    Bronze Star
    Purple Heart (2ea)
     

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  4. Rex in OTZ

    Rex in OTZ Well-Known Member

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    Tsutomu Yamaguchi the “nijyuu hibakusha,” or “twice-bombed person.”
    The Man Who Survived Two Atomic Bombs.
    In 2009, Yamaguchi learned that he was dying of stomach cancer.
    He died on January 4, 2010 in Nagasaki at the age of 93?!


    For the second time in three days, he’d had the misfortune of being within two miles of a nuclear explosion. For the second time, he’d been fortunate enough to survive.
    Tsutomu Yamaguchi wasn’t the only person to endure two atomic blasts. His coworkers Akira Iwanaga and Kuniyoshi Sato were also in Nagasaki when the second bomb fell, as was Shigeyoshi Morimoto, a kite maker who had miraculously survived Hiroshima despite being only a half-mile from ground zero. All told, some 165 people may have experienced both attacks, yet Yamaguchi was the only person officially recognized by the Japanese government as a “nijyuu hibakusha,” or “twice-bombed person.”
     

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  5. Rex in OTZ

    Rex in OTZ Well-Known Member

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    Caption: Owen J. Baggett (1920-2006) was a soldier of the United States Air Force. In 1943, in the middle of World War 2, his plane was severely damaged by Japanese fighter planes over Burma. The crew bailed out with parachutes. While Baggett was in mid-air, a Japanese fighter plane approached him. Baggett drew his M1911 pistol and fired straight at the pilot. The pilot lost control of the plane and plunged to certain death. Baggett’s feat to down a plane with a mere pistol became absolutely legendary.

     

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  6. Rex in OTZ

    Rex in OTZ Well-Known Member

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    Fascinating Tale of American Mrs Iva Toguri D'Aquino.
    According to Wiki her birthday was 4 July 1916.

    With the beginning of American involvement in the Pacific War, Toguri, like a number of other Americans in Japanese territory, was pressured by the Japanese central government under Hideki Tojo to renounce her United States citizenship. She refused to do so. Toguri was subsequently declared an enemy alien and was refused a war ration card. "A tiger does not change its stripes" is a quote attributed to her. To support herself, she found work as a typist at a Japanese news agency and eventually worked in a similar capacity for Radio Tokyo.
    In November 1943, Allied prisoners of war forced to broadcast propaganda selected her to host portions of the one-hour radio show The Zero Hour. Her producer was an Australian Armyofficer, Major Charles Cousens, who had pre-war broadcast experience and had been captured at the fall of Singapore. Cousens had been tortured and coerced to work on radio broadcasts, as had his assistants, U.S. Army Captain Wallace Ince and Philippine Army Lieutenant Normando Ildefonso "Norman" Reyes. Toguri had previously risked her life smuggling food into the nearby prisoner of war (POW) camp where Cousens and Ince were held, gaining the inmates' trust. After she refused to broadcast anti-American propaganda, Toguri was assured by Major Cousens and Captain Ince that they would not write scripts having her say anything against the United States. True to their word, no such propaganda was found in her broadcasts. Toguri hosted a total of 340 broadcasts of The Zero Hour
    At no time did Toguri call herself "Tokyo Rose" during the war, and in fact there was no evidence that any other broadcaster had done so. The name was a catch-all used by Allied forces for all of the women who were heard on Japanese propaganda radio.
    On September 29, 1949, the jury found Toguri guilty on a sole count, Count VI, which stated, "That on a day during October, 1944, the exact date being to the Grand Jurors unknown, said defendant, at Tokyo, Japan, in a broadcasting studio of The Broadcasting Corporation of Japan, did speak into a microphone concerning the loss of ships." She was fined $10,000 and given a 10-year prison sentence.
    She married Felipe D'Aquino (last name sometimes given only as Aquino), a Portuguese citizen of Japanese-Portuguese descent, on April 19, 1945. At the same time, Toguri formally became a Catholic, a faith she would keep through her prison years. The marriage was registered with the Portuguese Consulate in Tokyo, with Toguri declining to take her husband's citizenship.
    http://www.boston.com/news/globe/ob.../28/iva_toguri_90_branded_as_wwii_tokyo_rose/
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iva_Toguri_D'Aquino
    http://www.dyarstraights.com/orphan-ann-home-page/
    http://www.dyarstraights.com/orphan-ann-home-page/the-hunt-for-tokyo-rose/
    http://www.dyarstraights.com/orphan-ann-home-page/the-trial-of-the-century/
     

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  7. Rex in OTZ

    Rex in OTZ Well-Known Member

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    Hero Street, USA this is way too cool!
    The Mid west town of Silvis, Illinois
    The former Second Street is now known as Hero Street USA. The muddy block and a half long street was home to Mexican immigrants who worked for the Rock Island Railroad.
    The 22 families who lived on the street were a close-knit group. From this small street, 84 men served in World War II, Korea, and Vietnam. The street contributed more men to military services in World War II and Korea than any other street of comparable size in the U.S.
    In total, eight men from Hero Street gave their lives during World War II—Joseph Gomez, Peter Macias, Johnny Muños, Tony Pompa, Frank Sandoval, Joseph "Joe" Sandoval, William "Willie" Sandoval and Claro Solis.
    Second Street's name was changed to Hero Street in honor of these men and their families.
    Of the 22 families on Second Street, the two Sandoval families had a total of thirteen men who served in the armed forces. Three died in service during World War II. The Sandovals were two families of Mexican immigrants, with the same surname and lived on Second Street. Eduvigis and Angelina Sandoval immigrated to the U.S. from Romita, Mexico. Their son, Frank, was a combat engineer assigned to help build the Ledo Road in Burma. He was killed when his unit was sent unexpectedly to the front to fight for control of a key airbase. His older brother, Joe, was assigned to the 41st Armored Infantry Division in Europe. He was killed in April 1944, just days before the war ended.
    Joseph and Carmen Sandoval also immigrated to the United States from Mexico. When the war broke out, their son Willie asked for permission to enlist in the Army and both parents consented to their son's request. Willie Sandoval was trained as a paratrooper and was assigned to the 82nd Airborne Division. He fought in Italy and Germany, and was killed on October 6, 1944, during a combat mission related to Operation Market-Garden, the largest airborne operation of all time.
     
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  8. Rex in OTZ

    Rex in OTZ Well-Known Member

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    I found this sight, Wow!
    Second New Zealand Expeditionary Force, The 28th (Māori) Battalion

    'The 28th (Māori) Battalion was part of the 2nd New Zealand Division, the fighting arm of the 2nd New Zealand Expeditionary Force (2NZEF) during the Second World War (1939-45). A frontline infantry unit in Europe made up entirely of volunteers, the Battalion usually contained 700-750 men, divided into five companies.'

    My guess the average german trooper had their hands full dealing with a New Zealand Māori.

    http://www.28maoribattalion.org.nz/story-of-the-28th/about-the-28th

    https://28maoribattalion.org.nz/photo-gallery/all?page=7

    maori war cry the haka
     

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  9. Rex in OTZ

    Rex in OTZ Well-Known Member

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    Joseph "Joe" Medicine Crow (October 27, 1913 – April 3, 2016) was a war chief, author and historian of the Crow Nation of Native Americans. His writings on Native American history and reservation culture are considered seminal works, but he is best known for his writings and lectures concerning the Battle of the Little Bighorn in 1876. He received the Bronze Star Medal and the Légion d'honneur for service during World War II.

    Joseph's part in World War II
    After spending the latter half of 1942 working in the naval ship yards in Bremerton, Washington, Medicine Crow joined the Army in 1943. He became a scout in the 103rd Infantry Division, and fought in World War II. Whenever he went into battle, he wore his war paint beneath his uniform and a sacred eagle feather beneath his helmet.
    Medicine Crow completed all four tasks required to become a war chief: touching an enemy without killing him (counting coup), taking an enemy's weapon, leading a successful war party, and stealing an enemy's horse. He touched a living enemy soldier and disarmed him after turning a corner and finding himself face to face with a young German soldier:“The collision knocked the German's weapon to the ground. Mr. Crow lowered his own weapon and the two fought hand-to-hand. In the end Mr. Crow got the best of the German, grabbing him by the neck and choking him. He was going to kill the German soldier on the spot when the man screamed out 'momma.' Mr. Crow then let him go.”
    He also led a successful war party and stole fifty horses owned by the Nazi SS from a German camp singing a traditional Crow honor song as he rode off.


    http://www.badassoftheweek.com/medicinecrow.html

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3525855/Crow-Tribe-war-chief-buried-veterans-cemetery.html
     

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  10. Rex in OTZ

    Rex in OTZ Well-Known Member

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    The Odd History of Nazi Creek, Alaska.

    In the middle of the northern Pacific Ocean, on a desolate Alaskan island closer to Russia than to continental North America, amid the vast Aleutian tundra, there resides Nazi Creek.
    Well, for one, few if any people have ever actually set foot near Nazi Creek. The closest population center is 242 miles away on Adak Island (population: 329). And because the creek is part of the federally protected Aleutian Islands Wilderness, visitors can only come with a permit or as part of an official tour group.
    The 0.7-mile-long stream’s official name has existed since World War II, even though the eponymous German regime never set foot on Little Kiska Island, seeing as their battlefront was on the exact opposite side of the planet.
    How did the creek get such a bizarre name? And as mainland America grapples with newly empowered neo-Nazi groups and geographic locations named for the similarly evil ideology of the Confederacy, how has Nazi Creek’s name remained unnoticed or unchanged for more than half a century?
    https://www.google.com/amp/s/amp.thedailybeast.com/the-secret-history-of-nazi-creek-alaska
     

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  11. Rex in OTZ

    Rex in OTZ Well-Known Member

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    Battle of Midway
    [​IMG]

    Although the Battle of Midway was one of the first major encounters between the U.S. and Japanese forces in the Pacific, it had a major influence on the future course of the conflict. On June 3, 1942, the Japanese launched an attack on the Aleutian Islands with an aim to divert the attention away from their true target – the Midway Atoll. But the Americans broke the Japanese naval code and knew exactly what the Imperial Combined Fleet was planning. They clashed with the Japanese on June 4 and after three days of fighting, forced the enemy to give up the attempt to invade Midway. But most importantly, the U.S. forces inflicted a serious blow to the Japanese naval and air power. The Imperial forces lost all four carriers that participated in the battle and about 250 aircraft. After the Battle of Midway, the immediate threat to the United States virtually came to an end.
     
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  12. Rex in OTZ

    Rex in OTZ Well-Known Member

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    Battle of Okinawa
    [​IMG]

    One of the bloodiest battles of the Pacific War was fought from April 1 to June 22, 1945, for the island of Okinawa. The Americans wanted the island at the southern tip of Japan to create a base for air raids on Japan as well as to “rehearse” for the planned invasion of Japan’s main islands. However, they met a fierce resistance. By June 22, the U.S. troops suffered nearly 50,000 casualties of which approximately one quarter were deaths. The Japanese, on the other hand, lost about 100,000 of 110,000 men. The largest amphibious campaign of the Pacific War also claimed heavy civilian casualties as an estimated 100,000 civilians were killed by the end of the campaign. According to many historians, the Battle of Okinawa had a major influence on the US decision to drop atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki as it clearly revealed that the invasion of Japan would claim huge casualties on both sides.
     
  13. sheriffjohn

    sheriffjohn Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I very much regret not being able to talk to my parents' generation about WWII. It's only been recently that photos and film footage has been available to everyone.
    I had old friends who lived through those battles, but sadly, they are gone.
     
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  14. locutus

    locutus Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I've been to the Eagle's Nest. A beautiful place in a beautiful setting. A part of world history that should be preserved for future generations.

    Many of us get upset over the destruction of Confederate monuments. Destroying the Eagle's Nest would be a similar atrocity.

    Let history stand for future generations. The bad as well as the good. Maybe they will be smarter than us and learn from it.
     
  15. sheriffjohn

    sheriffjohn Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Wow ! Thanks for this. I can think of a couple of places those good ol' boys would come in handy.
     
  16. Rex in OTZ

    Rex in OTZ Well-Known Member

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    It's odd but the Japanese do recognize little known fact that twelve American prisoners of war lost their lives by the Atomic Bomb dropped on Hiroshima.
    And are featured in memorials.
    At least twenty-three US servicemen were in Hiroshima when the bomb fell. They were prisoners of war, former aviators, held at several locations in downtown Hiroshima. It’s likely we would have never learned of this if a B-29 had not ditched off Japan two days after the Hiroshima attack, on August 8, 1945. Picked up by a fishing boat, the crew ended up on a drill field in devastated Hiroshima, bound by rope and blindfolded.

    http://old.post-gazette.com/pg/08230/904953-54.stm

    https://www.cbsnews.com/news/family-shines-light-on-american-pow-killed-by-hiroshima-blast/

    http://www.us-japandialogueonpows.org/HoroshimaPOW.htm

     

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  17. SGWGunsmith

    SGWGunsmith Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Sheriff John writes about how he wishes he could have spoken with his grandparents about World War II. My grandmother had 4 stars on the flag in her window. My Uncles Leroy, Earl, Jack and my father Arthur, all signed up to enlist on December 8, 1941. He wasn't my dad as yet, not until 54 months were spent in the Pacific Theater dealing with the Japanese. My uncle Earl also spent a whole bunch of time in the C'bees, my uncle Leroy flew P 51 Mustangs during the Pacific conflict and uncle Jack was with the Army Air Corps as a B-29 tail gunner in the European action against Hitler.
    Me, I'm a "boomer" born shortly after that war ended along with my cousin John, named after his dad, uncle Jack. My other uncle, Bill served as a Marine in Korea as he was too young to serve in World War II.
    Cousin Johnny and I sat on the floor at grandma's house for many Christmases as very young lads, listening to 100's of the involvements these band of brothers were involved with during that war, but only after they had enough to drink, to the point that they were willing to talk. I sat there, awe struck, when hearing about how these 5 gentile, kind uncles, of mine, and my own father, had to end the life of those who were involved with bombing Pearl Harbor, pillaging Korea, and killing millions of people whose only fault was that they were Jewish.
    When my father passed, my mom gave me a huge box of stuff my dad brought back home with him. There was a silk flag with a huge red circle on it and a bunch of Japanese blood and writing, along with a .30 caliber bullet hole that went through several layers of the folded flag that soldier had around his waist. A whole bunch of black & white pictures he took of the native people inhabiting the islands they over-ran during their advance toward Japan. Many of those pictures my Mom shared with me what my Dad had told her about. One involve a Belgian Shepherd dog named "Peaches" who ran back and forth between commanders taking messages so that radio silence was not broken. As I get older, I wish to heaven that I would have tried to extract more from Dad about his time...........over there.
     
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  18. EclecticShooter

    EclecticShooter Well-Known Member

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    Here's info on my great-grandma's uncle who served in WW2 and Korea. Unfortunately, my Dad is the youngest in the family to have met him. He gave my Dad a 2 franc bill he got while in France and Dad has given it too me. I've been told he brought back a number of guns but no one knows what became of them. I also have a Japanese 6.5x50 Arisaka round that I found in a curio cabinet he owned. I really wish I could have known him. View attachment woodrow (1).pdf
     
  19. sheriffjohn

    sheriffjohn Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Years ago, "surplus" military firearms were cheap, lots bought to "sporterize" or as the basis of custom firearms. Somewhere along the line, original unaltered pieces began to rise in value. When I look at those with dings, scratches, etc. I wish they could talk.

    At some point, that old Garand, Carbine, '03, Enfield, etc. was a part of history, not just an interesting bit of machinery. Shooting them connects us with the past in a way many don't understand. To hold a bit of history is a pleasant thing.
     
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  20. sheepdawg

    sheepdawg Well-Known Member Supporter

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    My father was drafted into the Wehrmacht in 1944 when things started going bad. He spent about a month on the front lines and in October 1944 he was captured by the Americans near Metz, France. He would speak of his time in the POW camp, said the Americans treated him well, but would not talk about his time on the front lines. The Americans found out he was a very accomplished artist and he spent most of his time in captivity painting nose art, murals of pretty women (what else) in officer's, NCO and enlisted men's clubs and water colors of GIs, got to get your cigarettes somehow. He came to America in 1952, one of his lifelong friends was a guard at the camp. He passed away in 1992.

    Recently I came across this picture of German POWs taken near Metz, October 1944. The man on the front row, second from the right got my attention. Compare it to the picture of my dad in his Kraut uniform taken June 1944. The big ears stand out in both. Could it be possible? Odds would be astounding but a few people I've showed it two have noticed the similarities. My wife and a professional photographer I know swear it's the same person.


    german POWs Metz.jpg my father in his kraut uniform.jpg