Moisture barrier for safes?

Discussion in 'Gun Safes' started by dborns, Dec 17, 2019.

  1. dborns

    dborns Active Member

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    We just moved in to our new house and I got my safe room... I’ve got two in there, and am getting ready to bolt them down. It is a concrete floor, and these aren’t going anywhere. My question is, how important is a moisture barrier under these? That would be a huge pain to get something under them due to size, but I don’t want any damage to them.
     
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  2. W.T. Sherman

    W.T. Sherman Well-Known Member

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    where is your safe located? if it's a unfinished basement then there is no need for a "barrier".

    the key is to keep the humidity down, by way of dehumidifier so it's between 40-50% RH , not only will that take care of excessive humidity but also keep that mold and mildew smell out. which is a added plus

    here in NE Ohio humidity is oppressively high in the summers, which I'm betting it's like that Mo. and very low in the winters. I have my safe located in my unfished basement with the dehumidifier running just about 24/7 in the summer months, which is only 4 months here, and the humidity is between 40-50% RH, according to the humidity indicator in my safe. winter is no problem, the humidity is way below 40% RF, so my dehumidifier is off during the winter.

    I don't use nothing else, "gun socks", "barrier, "golden rod", or coat my guns in any goop and have zero spec of rust on any of my guns in the past 30 years
     
    Last edited: Dec 17, 2019

  3. dborns

    dborns Active Member

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    It’s in a somewhat unfinished basement. It’s the room under the front porch. Concrete floor/ walls, plywood ceiling.
     
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  4. Caveman Jim

    Caveman Jim Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I just completed my gun/reloading room (10x12’) on a concrete floor. Up here in Washington it is wet, clammy and cold so I opted to put down some engineered flooring with a vapor barrier underneath. It’s not that big of a room so wanted it free of any condensation.
    It would surely suck if the bottom of a safe were to rust out.
    Good luck with your new safe room.;)
     
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  5. W.T. Sherman

    W.T. Sherman Well-Known Member

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    that is exactly how my basement is, concrete floor and concrete cinder blocks, my safe sits directly on the concrete floor, have no issue with moisture coming through the floor for over 30 years.

    only issue I see with water getting into your safe, is if your water heater dies then turns your basement into a indoor swimming pool :D
     
    Last edited: Dec 18, 2019
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  6. MisterMcCool

    MisterMcCool Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Send me your address and I will send you desiccant packs to keep in the safe.
     
  7. PeeJay1313

    PeeJay1313 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Not only do I keep a dehumidifier in my basement, but I also keep one in my safe as well..
     
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  8. primer1

    primer1 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    A couple 2x4 boards or something similar would add air between the safe and the floor, and also add a layer of protection when the water heater fails. Maybe build a wood frame with deck screws the size of the base. There is always the possibility of leaking walls or minor flooding when the heavy rains come down, even if has never happened... yet.
     
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  9. OLD Ron

    OLD Ron Well-Known Member

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    I put mine on a 4" cement pad & bolted both to the floor . Inside I have electric heaters & sealed around the bottom inside of the safes so no moisture can get in where the bolts go through .
     
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  10. W.T. Sherman

    W.T. Sherman Well-Known Member

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    yeeeeeeeeeeeeah, that won't work one bit if your water heater goes. water isn't going to stop if it reaches a certain level, it'll just keep filling up your basement. until one of two things happen

    1) somebody physically turns off the value on the main water line

    or

    2) the lake or reservoir empties out

    the best and only prevention to make sure your water heater doesn't go, is to replace it when it show tell tale signs of it being on it's last leg.

    mine told me last month that it's dying, when I saw a small pool of water at the base. I hop-sing right over to HOME DEPOT and bought a new one to replace it
     
    Last edited: Dec 18, 2019
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  11. OLD Ron

    OLD Ron Well-Known Member

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    You can buy a water alarm too .
    Would be cheaper than that water bill .
     
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  12. W.T. Sherman

    W.T. Sherman Well-Known Member

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    yeah, that would be good......…………...….. if you're home, but you're forgetting MURPHY'S LAW OF WATER HEATERS:

    if a water heater goes, it'll usually happen when you aren't there for several hours[​IMG]
     
  13. towboater

    towboater Well-Known Member

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    Our basement has a drain. :cool:
     
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  14. freefall

    freefall Well-Known Member

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    I'm a pretty smart guy. I drew up the plan for the house we wanted built. I was working in Anc that summer, not every day, when I wasn't working in there for union operator scale, I was working on the house for wages.
    I got back in the afternoon after the basement slab got poured. I looked at the rough=in plumbing in the mech room, said "Where's the floor drain?"
    Plumber said "There's no drain on the plan!"
    I said "I didn't draw in the effing toilets either, but I hope they get put in!"
     
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  15. dborns

    dborns Active Member

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    All good advice, thanks. I found some flooring that’s a hard plastic that connects together. Not cheap but it’ll work well. It’s going to take some moving but I can rock it out of the way. I’ll mark around the front and sides of both with a pencil along with the bolt holes. Then move it and put the tiles down and cot where the bolts are drilled in the floor. Then move them back into place and secure them.

    As far as water heaters going bad, I saw a interesting appliance at a house and asked about it. It goes on your main line and if it detects water running longer than normal, it’ll alert you on your phone and you can shut it off with an app. It’s something I’m going to look into for my house.
     
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  16. dborns

    dborns Active Member

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    Got the safes done yesterday. I found 18”x18” rubber squares and used those. It was a job moving the big safe to install them.... I slid it back into place then drilled the holes and put in anchors. I only did two anchors on the big safe; one in front and one in the rear so it can’t be tipped forward. I then butted the smaller safe up next to it and bolted it down too. Theyre not going anywhere.
    I put in an outlet box to power the inner dehumidifier.
    The other two floor bolt holes in the big safe don’t have a plug, so I as thinking about expanding foam to seal those? Any suggestions?
     
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  17. OLD Ron

    OLD Ron Well-Known Member

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    The foam will do the job. silicone will too . The foam cans I have used you need to use it all up & that's a lot . Not to mention the mess .
     
  18. dborns

    dborns Active Member

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    Ok I’ll try the foam. And I agree it’s a mess and I’ve never come up with a way to seal the can after use to keep it from going to waste.
     
  19. W.T. Sherman

    W.T. Sherman Well-Known Member

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    I would be careful how much humidity you suck out of the safe, if you have rifles that have wood furniture you don't want it too dry in there. about a 40-50% RH would be about right, go to HOME DEPOT and get yourself a small humidity indicator and put in the safe
     
    OLD Ron likes this.
  20. SGWGunsmith

    SGWGunsmith Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I have three safes in my shop for firearms inventory. None of those guns inside have "wood furniture" but some do have some very nice walnut stocks and metal furniture.
    Each safe has a dryer in it to control, or eliminate moisture. If the wood stock, or those that have wood furniture, elsewhere in this country :rolleyes: is sealed properly, no harm will befall those firearms. Never hurts to wipe the firearms metal with a good rust preventative either.
     
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