Model 1894

Discussion in 'Curio & Relic Discussion' started by machelis, Apr 10, 2009.

  1. machelis

    machelis New Member

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    Are there any websites (or books, people, etc ..) that could tell build years from the vin stamp? I have a Winchester Model 94 in .30-30 that's been in the family since new (I think) and has a 74xxxx number. From pictures and other for sale, I guess it's somewhere around 1913-1914. Could someone else shed some light for me?

    Thanks.
     
  2. SHOOTER13

    SHOOTER13 New Member

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    Model 1894 book

    Yes, there is a small paperback book that I've seen at gun shows that can date your lever action...as I have used it to date my top eject Model 1894 to 1977

    [​IMG]
     

  3. 30-30remchester

    30-30remchester New Member

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    Your rifle was built in 1914. If you need any more help just ask.
     
  4. allyellow

    allyellow New Member

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    here's some more light on the subject based on the condition it's in it could be worth these amounts

    10%=$475 30%=$675 50%=$950 70%=$1500 90%=$2,300 98%=$3,250


    could be worth more if its the deluxe model. I hope it's in good shape!

    source: bluebook of gun values 29th edition
     
  5. 30-30remchester

    30-30remchester New Member

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    I am fairly knowledgable on winchesters, if you could post some photos I could help you identify and value your gun.
     
  6. machelis

    machelis New Member

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    Thanks for the info fellas. I'll snap some pictures of it a.s.a.p.

    It's in decent shape. I got my first deer with it in '02 :D
     
  7. machelis

    machelis New Member

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    I just took these photos. Apparently I was thinking of something else when I posted this. My serial number is 769xxx.

    Here are the photos.
     

    Attached Files:

  8. allyellow

    allyellow New Member

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    that serial # shows 1914-1915 the blue book values listed above still apply
     
  9. machelis

    machelis New Member

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    Thanks. I'm thinking somewhere in the 10-30% range for this guy. Great shape mechanically and I still take it out once a year. Just doesn't have as much blueing on it anymore.
     
  10. 30-30remchester

    30-30remchester New Member

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    MACHELIS your 1894 was built in 1915. What you have is a RIFLE not a carbine they are two different things. It should have a 26" barrel and it is in original condition. The stock has not been refinished nor has it been reblued. All in all a very nice sound original 1894. Dont sweat the fact the reciever is silver this happened quite fast with just a little use. It was because Winchester used high nickle content in their recievers and the bluing didnt aheare well. If you can stand some personal advice, dont mess with the rifle it is fine and any refinishing will completely destroy its caracter and value.
     
  11. machelis

    machelis New Member

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    Thanks 30-30remchester. I don't plan on messing with it. It made it this far with just a little wear and tear, it can make it another 100 years without bluing.

    I have a picture of my dad, uncle and grandfather back in 1950 with three .30-30's. 2 had octagonal barrels and the other a shorter, round barrel. I don't know what happened to the other rifles, but this one has thankfully stuck around. I don't have enough hairs on my head to count how many deer this rifle has shot.

    I don't plan on ever selling it, but from the photos, what percentile would it be under from the numbers allyellow posted above?
     
  12. allyellow

    allyellow New Member

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    the values shown are for the rifle not the carbine. my book also states there was a 24inch barrel made also.

    nice rifle I would be very proud to own a rifle that had that kind of family history take care of it for the next generation to enjoy and good luck with it.
     
  13. machelis

    machelis New Member

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    But this is the rifle, not the carbine. I never mentioned anything about a carbine. And I have the 26" barrel.
     
  14. 30-30remchester

    30-30remchester New Member

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    ALLYELLOW hello just a word about the 24" barrels you mentioned. The standard barrel lenght for a rifle was 26", however you could order a RIFLE with barrels as short as 19" and they were known as "short rifles" and you could order RIFLES with barrels as long as 36" and they were known as "extra long rifles". Carbine barrels were 20" standard lenght with barrels as short as 12". These were known as "trappers".
     
  15. allyellow

    allyellow New Member

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    Thanks for the input. Wonder why the 2009 blue book ommitted these details?
     
  16. machelis

    machelis New Member

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    Maybe it was just too many different sizes, but valued at the same amount. All the carbines together and all the rifles together.
     
  17. 30-30remchester

    30-30remchester New Member

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    There are vast differences in values of the above mentioned variations. Standard carbines are the most produced and so are the lowest values. Rifles are quite a bit rarer and the price is 50% higher. Short rifles usually doubles that of standard rifles. I have never even seen an extra long for sale but Im sure the price will be STEEP. The trapper model carbines prices differ by barrel lenght and rarity. 15" and under are extremely valuable. Then there are the DELUXE and SPECIAL ORDER 1894's are in a price range of their own.
     
  18. machelis

    machelis New Member

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    Holy smokes. I'll stick with my standard barrel.