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Figured i'd open a separate thread about the needed knock back for a 12 gauge semi auto. I'm new to the idea of a shotgun and am thinking of buying one. I seem to think that since automatic and semi auto firearms require the round/shell to give more force that such a shell would require more recoil in order to cycle. Is this the case?
 

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a gas gun will have significanty less felt recoil.
1250s will "kick" less in a gas gun than 1100s in an old timey pump/.

My Benelli M4 will handle them all, no problems.
 

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a gas gun will have significanty less felt recoil.
1250s will "kick" less in a gas gun than 1100s in an old timey pump/.

My Benelli M4 will handle them all, no problems.
I take it a gas powered semi auto can take just about anything.
 

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Velocity isn't the only criteria for "power" in shotshells. "Dram Equivelent" is also important. I've forgotten more than I remember about this, but it has to do with comparison to black powder loads to smokeless powder. Generally speaking, most semi-auto shotguns today will function just fine with nearly any commercial shell of the type the gun is designed for if it is held properly. That said, can't really tell until you try various loads.

Only shotgun I ever had that absolutely would not function with less than high-brass buck or slugs was a High Standard Model "B" bullpup. Pistol-gripped, seldom fired from shoulder, it was a punisher on both ends.
 

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Depends on three factors. Weight of the load, velocity, and operating system of the shotgun. Like Locutus, I own an M4, that will digest almost anything, and several gas operated models come with an adjustible gas system these days. you can set it for goose droppers, or light field loads, and can be used for taking down a bear, ot a round of trap.

Recoil operated, that's a whole different can of worms, and you usually end up trying out a few different options, before you find one it likes. And if you have three, you might find that they like 3 different loads, or one in particular, that all 3 like.

For instance, my grandfather's 11-48 takes a stiff push, to cycle, and does best with slugs, from Winchester, but chokes on their 2.75 #4 and #6 loads. 4 or 6, Federals all day long. Remington 00 Buck, zero issues, any other brand, one hang up out of three loadings.

My SPAS 12, unless it's buck or slug, it gets switched over to pump, because, with the exception of turkey loads, the bolt might move about half way.

My M4 and my wife's Versamax, they don't care what you feed them.

Dad's 5500, pretty much the same, as long as you keep it clean. it gets dirty, it will run a few target loads, then start hanging up. Field loads will knock it loose again, and zero issues with slugs or buck.

When you go looking, might sound odd, but look into the used market, for someone upgrading. See what they ran and how well it worked for them. I got a smokin deal on that SPAS 12 because it needed a serious, sent to a local smith, cleaning, and the guy was getting rid of it because it wouldn't cycle bulk target loads. Something the shotgun was not designed to do, on semi, from the factory, and he didn't know it would go pump. Value at the time was around $1,500. I got it for $750, because he thought it was broken.

Myself, I'd look for a Versamax or a Mossberg 930, used or new, for reliability. Same with older 11-87s, or Mossberg 5500 Makr IIs. 5500 and 5500 Mark I models had a stiller recoils spring, and tend to need a fair amount of lube, to function with low pressure loads.
 

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I had a high standard that liked high brass in order to cycle.

Also helps if you reassemble them correctly when cleaning.
That model 10 was wierd about installing the recoil spring backwards.

https://www.shotgunworld.com/bbs/viewtopic.php?t=279771

The takeaway from my experence is just like the shotgunworld forum said.

To quote that forum:
'In at least three different places in the manual it clearly states that you should not use any lubricant around the gas system.

It's a tight tolerance gas system, designed to be self cleaning by literally blowing the debris out the action and into the housing.
If you add oil of any type to gas system, the gun will start jamming within a few rounds. The oil holds the powder residues that would normally be blown free and .001 clearance doesn't allow for any build up.


Run it dry with full power ammo and it will work every time....
run it wet or with mouse loads and you'll hate the gun'
 
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