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Military Bolt Action Cleaning.

734 Views 51 Replies 13 Participants Last post by  Southernguns
3
So I've listed that I was Military Trained. But that was a long, long, long, long time ago on a Continent far, far away. Back then Uncle Sam's Misguided Children attempted to train Sailors how to properly use small arms . So I'll include a bit of how to clean the M40A1 (Remington 700). Now my question is, does anyone else still clean their bolt action rifle for three days after it's been discharged?

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Uh, don't think I've ever cleaned any of mine for three days.

Materials needed to clean almost any gun: copper or non-steel correct caliber bore brush; patches; bore rod--not steel; patch holder; Hoppes #9, any kind of gun oil.....that's it! If it's a Hi Point PCC, need some GT85 to flood the action clean then put it away.

This is just not rocket science and a soldier would be left behind cleaning a gun for three days!!! 馃憖 :ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO:
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Uh, don't think I've ever cleaned any of mine for three days.

Materials needed to clean almost any gun: copper or non-steel correct caliber bore brush; patches; bore rod--not steel; patch holder; Hoppes #9, any kind of gun oil.....that's it! If it's a Hi Point PCC, need some GT85 to flood the action clean then put it away.

This is just not rocket science and a soldier would be left behind cleaning a gun for three days!!! 馃憖 :ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO:
The same exact quote, " After a weapon has been fired, it must be cleaned for at least three consecutive days." Also appeared in the M-14 manual. A little further down it states: "Graphite and carbon deposits will sweat from the pores of the metal for three days, thus the need for repeated cleaning." This is the Old School Military Procedures. I realize that everything changed with the M-16 Comic Book Cleaning Procedures. But drastic errors lend to drastic fixes. JMHO. But since simply running a clean patch through the bore should prove or disprove if such procedures may be useful, it should be easy enough to disavow? In my experience, I'm sure the last patch I put through before leaving the range is 100 percent clean, yet somehow the next day that 100 percent clean patch isn't. YMMV. But don't take the Governments or my words on it! I encourage folks to try it themselves. Then come back and poo poo that ancient Government Mandate.
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What I have used for years on my personal rifles and the Metro's Sniper Rifles
1. Dewey (Bearing) Coated Cleaning Rod
2. Proper Sized Brass Bore Brush
3. Proper Jag and or Slotted Cleaning Rod Tip (I use both depending on application)
3. Cotton Patches (*Correct Size for Calber)
4. M-16 Bristle Cleaning Brush. (So, no Bristles fall out!)
5. Hopes # 9 or Shooters Choice
6. Break-Free, G-96 or Slip 2000 (*If Break-Free is used be sure you to shake it up prior to use!!) I shake all of them!
7. Nylon Cleaning Picks
8. Remington Bolt Disassembly Tool. *Not necessary because there are other ways of disassembling the Bolt for cleaning and reassembly. But makes i easier!
9. Proper Lubrication points after cleaning and wipe of excess.
10. Once a year we used Sweet's 7.62 Solvent on the Sniper Rifle Bores.
* But if ever using Sweet's read the Instructions very carefully. Because if mixed with anything else it can etch the bore! And only leave in the Bore the suggested time before completely cleaning it out. It is also good for old military rifle bores that have been abused as far as maintenance and cleaning. But once again follow instructions. I have had to apply it several times to a couple of my old military rifles when I purchased them to get the Bore clean!
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With today's modern ammunition and improved cleaning products , it is no longer necessary to go through the 3-day cleaning cycle . That was a hold over from WWI when ingredients in both gunpowder and primers were exceptionally rust producing . during WWII days the gunpowder was better but primers were still very good at producing rust .
Today's powders are cleaner and primers not as rust producing as "the good old day's " use a good bore cleaner and one cleaning and an oiling should do the trick .
Me being old school will sometimes give a pet rifle a cleaning and oiling on day two , just because I still remember the 3-Day cleaning and figure the 2-Day cleaning will be insurance that my bore stay's rust free.
A lot of my guns just get 1 cleaning ... but my prized pets will get a 2 Day Cleaning ... as insurance !
Gary
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What I have used for years on my personal rifles and the Metro's Sniper Rifles
1. Dewey (Bearing) Coated Cleaning Rod
2. Proper Sized Brass Bore Brush
3. Proper Jag and or Slotted Cleaning Rod Tip (I use both depending on application)
3. Cotton Patches (*Correct Size for Calber)
4. M-16 Bristle Cleaning Brush. (So, no Bristles fall out!)
5. Hopes # 9 or Shooters Choice
6. Break-Free, G-96 or Slip 2000 (*If Break-Free is used be sure you to shake it up prior to use!!) I shake all of them!
7. Nylon Cleaning Picks
8. Remington Bolt Disassembly Tool. *Not necessary because there are other ways of disassembling the Bolt for cleaning and reassembly. But makes i easier!
9. Proper Lubrication points after cleaning and wipe of excess.
10. Once a year we used Sweet's 7.62 Solvent on the Sniper Rifle Bores.
* But if ever using Sweet's read the Instructions very carefully. Because if mixed with anything else it can etch the bore! And only leave in the Bore the suggested time before completely cleaning it out. It is also good for old military rifle bores that have been abused as far as maintenance and cleaning. But once again follow instructions. I have had to apply it several times to a couple of my old military rifles when I purchased them to get the Bore clean!
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Did I miss the bore guide (I use Lucas) part of the bolt action cleaning. PS: When ordering Lucas Bore Guides it is required to specify Tipton or Dewy Rods since they are of differing diameters. Jusyly food for thought in case anyone was interested. Thanks for listening.
M118,
Yes I forgot to mention the Bore Guide! THANKS!
*Also at home, I have a Collection Bottle that I can attach to the Muzzle to catch the patches and any solvent that might make it there. Just keeps my Bench Clean! (y)

03
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With today's modern ammunition and improved cleaning products , it is no longer necessary to go through the 3-day cleaning cycle . That was a hold over from WWI.
Gary
The M40A1 ancient USMC FMFRP 0-11A manual was issued in 1989. That's a long time after the WW's. The same procedures came with the M-25 Manual I got when Uncle Sam by CNO Direction issued me that rifle. So I'm going to say that you treat your favorites with Old School Love. But perhaps it's not without reason? That first patch sent down your pet rifles, is it 100 percent clean like the last patch was when you finished shooting? Or perhaps you didn't take notice since like me we got that Old World Training? I know I overlooked it since the Gunny demanded I just do it! But even now when I specifically look for it, well that next day patch ain't as clean as when I leave the range. YMMV.
Now this may sound silly, but just run a wet or dry patch down any rifle in the small arms locker and see if it's 100 percent clean like when you put it away. Perhaps it's a bit more profound a difference during those first three days? Since Uncle Sam's Misguided Children will tell Yall that my job was just to drive Marines to Work, perhaps I'm not the proper guide to take Y'all afield? But I will advocate that Y'all take me to task with your own experience from day one until I pass. If it ain't able to be duplicated than even pictures are lies. JMHO.
My 100 year old plus Swedish Mausers actually perform better with just a tad bit of copper fouling still in the bore. Many collectors feel the same way. No need for three days of cleaning, just get most of the carbon and then Hoppe's overnight followed by a dry patch. Then Mobil One for an hour, dry patch. I only use Sweet's on the rifle's first cleaning.
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My 100 year old plus Swedish Mausers actually perform better with just a tad bit of copper fouling still in the bore. Many collectors feel the same way. No need for three days of cleaning, just get most of the carbon and then Hoppe's overnight followed by a dry patch. Then Mobil One for an hour, dry patch. I only use Sweet's on the rifle's first cleaning.
I'm going to ask you to shift your paradigm. It's an 8541 Thing for historians. Get your barrel as clean as you can and just take one clean cold bore shot while annotating it. Now I'll boldly state that if you zero and clean that bore then take that first clean cold bore shot ten times over ten days you can't fire a fowled ten shot group that tight. That's why military precision shooters are trained to reference every shot after the clean cold bore to that benchmark. IE Compition shooters have throw aways to get to their tightest Compition group size for convenience. Now when you only have one shot to demark the difference between life or death, that most repeatable tightest grouping just one time cold clean bore shot gives you the best chance at survival. JMHO. But I only ask that you experience that for yourself. Since in Compition it's all about how many rounds you repeatedly put on target, and since it's all about putting that first cold clean bore round on target, perhaps a paradigm shift needs to be considered. There is a reason why Military Precision Shooters (SCOUT SNIPERS) meticulously log their clean cold bore shots, while Compition Shooters toss them away to foul their bores. YMMV.
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To go a little further, hunters should zero their rifles to their first cold clean bore shot since it is the most repeatable and most accurate. IE a successful hunt should be a one round proposition and the center of a ten round group is going to be off from the first cold clean bore shot taken. So if you expect to fire ten rounds to harvest Bambi, waste that cold clean bore and let your fouled barrel corrode while you wasted that most repeatable clean cold bore round. Don't believe me, I've asked you to challenge me at every step with your own experience. Zero that clean cold bore and see how many follow up shots you require when hunting. JMHO.
Have to laugh. Everyone is going to do what works for them. I have a target downstairs for my "sold long ago", 7.62 cal. at 100 yds. with five holes cutting each other with a mid-range priced, 3-9, Weaver scope, shot off the hood of my pick-up truck with a rolled up towel for a rest. Also used to have a 3" black dotted bullseye at 100 yds. with an open sighted .223/5.56 gun I had and still have, shot from the hood of the same truck. Methinks the shooter is the biggest variable. I don't care if anyone believes it nor not. Over and out.
At the ranges I've typically taken deer, a cold bore vs fouled shot would make zero difference. I've yet to ever shoot a cold bore vs fouled shot from any of my (or anyone else's) rifles that were so drastically different that I missed the target. Now, with that said, for a long range sniper shot, it very well could make a difference and for competitors, the same. For most of us casual and sport shooters, and perhaps even in a defense scenario, I don't see it mattering all that much.

As for cleaning, I no longer use brass brushes and have switched to nylon. I use Hoppes #9, and if copper fouling is extreme enough, KG-12, followed by dry patching and some oil. Sometimes I don't even clean if my range count is low.
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Worst case, Mini-30. Yet less than 0.25 MOA is attainable with 5 Cold Clean Bore Rounds. Best case, it will shoot within the shots 3,4,&5 group all day if the shooter does thier part.
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Then there was the Russian method with corrosive primers in their Mosins. Pee down the bore.
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Then there was the Russian method with corrosive primers in their Mosins. Pee down the bore.
Not sure I want to put Old Blue through such temperature extremes nowadays. LOL
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I'm going to ask you to shift your paradigm. It's an 8541 Thing for historians. Get your barrel as clean as you can and just take one clean cold bore shot while annotating it. Now I'll boldly state that if you zero and clean that bore then take that first clean cold bore shot ten times over ten days you can't fire a fowled ten shot group that tight. That's why military precision shooters are trained to reference every shot after the clean cold bore to that benchmark. IE Compition shooters have throw aways to get to their tightest Compition group size for convenience. Now when you only have one shot to demark the difference between life or death, that most repeatable tightest grouping just one time cold clean bore shot gives you the best chance at survival. JMHO. But I only ask that you experience that for yourself. Since in Compition it's all about how many rounds you repeatedly put on target, and since it's all about putting that first cold clean bore round on target, perhaps a paradigm shift needs to be considered. There is a reason why Military Precision Shooters (SCOUT SNIPERS) meticulously log their clean cold bore shots, while Compition Shooters toss them away to foul their bores. YMMV.
Shot in a few vintage sniper matches with my 1918 m41/B. I once hit an 8 inch steel plate 3 out of 3 from 600 yards. I doubt I could do better with a hospital quality cleaned bore and to be truthful your way is too complicated. Again I know quite a few noted collectors of Swedes and they tend to agree with me.
Opinions are like........ You know the rest of the phrase. 馃ゴ
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I 've pulled apart a couple of my bolts namely on my M98 30/06AI, my No.1 Mk3 SMLE .303, my BRNO .22, M77 Ruger 22/250AI and have also pulled my 45/70 Marlin apart as well.

The reason being that after running around on the quad bike chasing pigs or spotlighting dust gets into everything especially red dust.

Wash them out in petrol, wipe dry and scratch any gunk that's still in and around the extractors, and if there is wash out again and around the head of the bolt then very lightly smear oil using sewing machine oil where the bolt slides up and down when cocking it.
Now my question is, does anyone else still clean their bolt action rifle for three days after it's been discharged?
Not this shooter.
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