Mil dot?

Discussion in 'Optics & Mounts' started by kymike, Oct 26, 2011.

  1. kymike

    kymike New Member

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    Are mil dot reticle scopes ballistically matched or do they work the same for all rifles?
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 26, 2011
  2. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    Nope. Not matched to a particular caliber.
     

  3. JonM

    JonM Moderator

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    mildot reticles are what C3 said. the dots are approx. 3.6 inches from center to center from each other at 100yards and the dot is approx. 1 inch diameter at 100 yards. you can sorta use the dots to estimate drop and use them as aiming points if you know how much drop your load has at a given range. beyound 1000 yards the exact decimal value starts becoming a factor but under that its easier to just round down the mil to 3.6

    i think mildots or moa marks are far more versatile than bdc type reticles. you can use them with any load as long as you know the drop at distance.
     
  4. kymike

    kymike New Member

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    I've been reading about mil dot and I'm thinking about getting one. I've only been using fine crosshairs since I've started using scopes. I bought a drop rectile then found out they are suppose to be matched, didn't do enough research. I like the mil dot scopes. They seem like the perfect scope to learn to use. You can use them as range finders and I really like that.
     
  5. TCH2FLY

    TCH2FLY New Member

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    Do your research on "mil-dot" scopes as well because there are variations in reticles.
    As an example here are two offerings from Leupold (not an endorsement, just an easy comparison). On the top the standard mil-dot showing the measurements (aka subtension), it is very straight forward but some people feel it lacks fine detail for longer distance or accuracy.
    [​IMG]


    Here is the Leupold Tactical Milling Reticle (TMR) with subtension, as you can see there are many graduations less than a full mil and the center is left open.
    [​IMG]

    These are only two possibilities, many high end scopes use their own variations.


    Another significant decision is Front (or first, FFP) or Rear (or second, SFP) Focal Plane design.
    In the SFP construction the subtention dimensions are only valid at one zoom setting (usually the highest) this means it requires a bit more math to use the reticle to range a target if you need to use a lower magnification. If you look through the scope and run the zoom in and out and the reticle does not "change size" it is most likely SFP. As you zoom out the dots appear to stay the same distance apart but since the target is "further" via the magnification, the spacing is no longer 1 mil AT THE TARGET.

    The hashmarks or dot on a FFP reticle will usually appear to be thinner/closer together at low power and larger farther apart at high power, this mean the subtensions are staying the same no matter what magnification you use ... i.e. always 1 mil, measured at the target. This can allow much quicker, more accurate ranging, as always YMMV.

    Check to see if the windage/elevation are done in MIL or MOA, you may prefer to have them match the reticle, especially if you are starting from scratch. Many will argue that is is easy to convert to inches but with a mil/mil system you never need to convert anything. If you are shooting a target and you are hitting low, measure the distance in mil with the reticle and turn the dial the appropriate amount. (for example screwed up a couple weeks ago at the range when, instead of using my reticle, I looked at the hits on the target and tried to come down based inches and the wrong distance to the target. As my excuse I had been switching rifles and lanes but frankly I totally screwed up. If I had just read the target using the reticle I could have been dead on :mad: oh well :rolleyes:

    Good Luck
     
  6. JonM

    JonM Moderator

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    I switched from mil reticle to moa. Got tired of the mental hula hoops with the typical mil setup. I think of distances in inches and feet. Moa is basically an inch at 100.

    MOA
    100=1
    200=2
    300=3
    1000=10

    MIL
    100=3.6
    200=7.2
    300=10.8
    1000=36

    So with mils your having to calculate 7*3.6 to get the mil value at 700yds. Thats just one step only gets more fun from there.

    I personally find moa easier. A lot of folks like milradian, technically milrad is fastest but i find that even more convoluted. Im just set in my ways.

    Look at all three and pick the one thats comfy for you.
     
  7. kymike

    kymike New Member

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    Thanks for all the input. I really don't know what I'm wanting to get yet. I have a tc icon .22-250. I do target shooting only. I would like to get something with a lot of magnification.
     
  8. Dillinger

    Dillinger New Member

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    If I may:

    You might want to think about a set of Kenton Industries target knobs for your specific scope, rifle and round?

    Look. I have been there. I read ALL the books. I did all the research. I felt the mil-dot was the right reticle for me.

    I bought a Leupold 4.5x14. I am ambivalent.

    I bought a Leupold 8.5x25 for my 7mm with a thin reticle, got a set of Kenton Industries Knobs and I LOVE it! :D

    It's tuned for my rifle, my round and when I dial in 600 yards, I can hit the target at 600 yards without extra math or a sliding, Abacus style, math calculator to figure out what oval to use.

    If you can afford the Keaton Ind. solution, I would HIGHLY recommend it.

    JD