Metal shavings out of barrel

Discussion in '.22 Rifle/Rimfire Discussion' started by Cory2, Dec 26, 2010.

  1. Cory2

    Cory2 New Member

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    I very recently acquired a remington 597 in 22lr and i did a shortened version of a break in process on it and everything went fine. I put about 60 more rounds through it and cleaned it with hops 9 then brush then dry patch. Everything was fine. I put about 20 more rounds through it and cleaned it the same way (im anal about my guns being clean... i will clean them because they havent been cleaned in a week or two) but this time when i pulled the brush out long metal shavings (about 3/8 inch long) came out. They where very pliable so i suspected they where lead but i wasn't certain. I examined the barrel to the best of my ability and everything looked fine. Shiny as a mirror.

    I was just wondering if this is something i should be concerned about and do i have anything to worry about with using a brush to clean my .22?


    Also, I was shooting remington bulk and then put 10 cci stingers through it when the shavings where found. Another question, my brother says that when you wash your hands after shooting guns you are supposed to use cold water and NOT hot water... Is that true? and why?
     
  2. Hawg

    Hawg New Member

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    Stay away from the Remingtons and the problem with shaved bullets will most likely go away. If you want to use bulk ammo use Federal or Winchester. Remington is crap.
     

  3. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    I am afraid that you have ruined your rifle by using a bore brush on it. If you will pack it up and send to me, I'll dispose of it for you- no charge- 'cause I'm a nice guy. :rolleyes:

    Yes, I am only kidding. A new barrel may have some breaking-in to do- simply wearing machined parts smooth. A bronze brush cannot hurt a steel barrel. Yes, that was lead you saw.

    Ref: washing your hands, soap and water. Hot or cold does not matter. If your brother says something about hot water "opening your pores and letting lead in" he must have pores the size of a softball- lead is not a skin penetrant hazard, unless it is moving at high speed. But washing hands after cleaning a gun, shooting, or handling ammo is a very good practice to follow that many folk miss. Lead is taken into the body by inhalation- breathing it, and by ingestion- eating it.
     
  4. robocop10mm

    robocop10mm Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    True, lead is most readily introduced into the body by injestion. Next comes inhalation then transdermal absorption. Yes cold water is considered best. Yes you can open up your pores enouigh to get some lead into your body. I would concentrate more on thorough cleaning. Two good rounds with soap and water before eating or smoking. The lead transferred to your mouth (and digestive tract) is far more dangerous than what may get through your skin.

    If the lead is suspended in an oily or greasy medium on your hands, hot soapy water may be the only way to get it all off.
     
  5. cpttango30

    cpttango30 New Member

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    Your cleaning the barrel on a 22lr? Why would you go and do something like that?
     
  6. Hawg

    Hawg New Member

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    I was wondering that too but I wasn't gonna said nuthin.:D
     
  7. Bigdog57

    Bigdog57 New Member

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    Yep, only clean the bore when accuracy begins to fall off. The action - that's a different matter! ;)
    Heal-bulleted rimfires like a lightly fouled barrel.
     
  8. Hawg

    Hawg New Member

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    I just wipe down the outside. When it quits working then I'll clean it.:D
     
  9. jwh1956

    jwh1956 New Member

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    I have a marlin 22 model 60 i yhink it is its a short model with the barrel band i really have'nt looked but its about 25 years old brush the barrel twice in its life and it wwill drive tacks at 50 yards
     
  10. JTJ

    JTJ Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I have an older Ruger 10/22 that was not shooting very well. I brushed and cleaned the bore and it is shooting fine again.
     
  11. Vearl Brown

    Vearl Brown New Member

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    Clean it---WHY ?? I havent cleaned mine for at least 25 years !! You put more wear on them cleaning them. I have seen rifles with the blue worn in spots that have NEVER been shot but have had the hell cleaned out of them.
    Sounds like a lot of BS ?? I would be willing to bet that I have shot more rounds than every one on this page put together---FACT !! When I was working (I'm retired now) I was shooting 25,000--30,000 rounds a year (yes the number is correct).
    Love the rifle but NOT to death !!!
     
  12. Bigdog57

    Bigdog57 New Member

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    Any gun I get has a good comprehensive 'first cleaning', no matter if it's NEW or fifty years old- I don't know it's history and how well it was cared for. Most NEW .22 rifles theses days are coated in a thick preservative oil(my new 10-22 felt like it had maple syrup in it!) - this keeps it from rustig in the store, but is too thick for proper functioning. Virtually every older twentytwo rifle I get is FILTHY. So this puts me on Home Base. Once I begin shooting, I only run a dry swab through the bore IF it gets dirty from lower-grade ammo. NEVER a brush unless it's really crappy. Rimfires run happiest with a light fouling in the bore. Serious match shooters will say it takes forty shots to properly 'season' the bore. I am NOT that picky, and am satisfied with four or five 'foulers' before shooting groups on a clean barrel.
    I keep the action cleaned and lubed LIGHTLY. Especially necessary for semiautos. Grunge in the firing pin channel or under the extractor causes most failures.
    Cleaning to the point of being anal isn't good, but neither is letting the gun get crusty...... ;)